Dale Earnhardt: Good-bye or Good Riddance?

Dale Earnhardt: Good-bye or Good Riddance?

Post by Daryl Grie » Sat, 03 Nov 2001 20:23:24


The only thing Jeff Gordon rules is dale ernhart jr.

Quote:
> Jeff Gordon Rules Nascar!


> > Jeff Gordon is an arrogant punk.  Most people hate him and for good
> reason.


> > > But JEFF is still a great driver following in Dales footsteps !! and
yes
> I
> > > am a lurker in this group but I went to Nazereth this past weekend and
> it
> > > was my first Indy Car race but NASCAR RULES  and so does JEFF Gordon
!!
> > > I just lost my husband in Feb so all I have left is racing as he was
> more
> > > into football so don't come back to *** me please!!! Pam
> > > --
> > > Pam


> > > > At'a boy Jeff......I'm a Jarrett fan but Racing this year is not the
> > same
> > > > without the greatest....I do miss the Dale and Dale show...


> > > > > Yes...

> > > > > Well said, if not well-spelled.

> > > > > But Earnhardt still simply got a fatal dose of his own medicine...

 
 
 

Dale Earnhardt: Good-bye or Good Riddance?

Post by Mphsrick » Tue, 06 Nov 2001 03:08:40

i have never like earnhardt and that will not change since he passed.  but i do
think it is only proper to be respectful to the ones who have given the
untilmate price for our sport.

 
 
 

Dale Earnhardt: Good-bye or Good Riddance?

Post by Mphsrick » Tue, 06 Nov 2001 10:55:20

ok ok i mis-spelled ultimate  so shoot me

 
 
 

Dale Earnhardt: Good-bye or Good Riddance?

Post by Barry Posne » Tue, 06 Nov 2001 11:51:10

Quote:

> ok ok i mis-spelled ultimate  so shoot me

Why not DIY?

bp

 
 
 

Dale Earnhardt: Good-bye or Good Riddance?

Post by Mike Marlo » Tue, 06 Nov 2001 19:33:40


Quote:
> i have never like earnhardt and that will not change since he passed.  but
i do
> think it is only proper to be respectful to the ones who have given the
> untilmate price for our sport.

You make it sound like he willfully sacrificed himself for racing.  Somehow
it still seems to me like Earnhardt simply got killed in a car accident on
the track.

-Mike-

 
 
 

Dale Earnhardt: Good-bye or Good Riddance?

Post by Scot » Tue, 06 Nov 2001 20:55:09

Quote:

> The only thing Jeff Gordon rules is dale ernhart jr.


> > Jeff Gordon Rules Nascar!


> > > Jeff Gordon is an arrogant punk.  Most people hate him and for good
>  reason.


> > > > But JEFF is still a great driver following in Dales footsteps !! and
>  yes
>  I
> > > > am a lurker in this group but I went to Nazereth this past weekend and
>  it
> > > > was my first Indy Car race but NASCAR RULES  and so does JEFF Gordon
>  !!
> > > > I just lost my husband in Feb so all I have left is racing as he was
>  more
> > > > into football so don't come back to *** me please!!! Pam
> > > > --
> > > > Pam


> > > > > At'a boy Jeff......I'm a Jarrett fan but Racing this year is not the
>  same
> > > > > without the greatest....I do miss the Dale and Dale show...


> > > > > > Yes...

> > > > > > Well said, if not well-spelled.

> > > > > > But Earnhardt still simply got a fatal dose of his own medicine...

///////////I can't help but agree with that.
 
 
 

Dale Earnhardt: Good-bye or Good Riddance?

Post by Mphsrick » Thu, 08 Nov 2001 05:32:51

no soldier goes to war intending to die in battle. yet they gae the ulimate
price for our freedom.  likewise no races goes on the track intending to die on
the track.  but those who have died have given the ultimate price for our
sport.  
 
 
 

Dale Earnhardt: Good-bye or Good Riddance?

Post by Mike Marlo » Thu, 08 Nov 2001 08:30:10


Quote:
> no soldier goes to war intending to die in battle. yet they gae the
ulimate
> price for our freedom.  likewise no races goes on the track intending to
die on
> the track.  but those who have died have given the ultimate price for our
> sport.

It would be considerate if you would include the quoted text in your
replies, so that we can know precisely what you're referring to.  I'm going
to assume that you're replying to my comments since I did write a reply
about Earnhardt not having sacrificed himself.  If I'm incorrect in this
assumption, then you can ignore the following comments.

There is a huge difference between a soldier and a race driver.  A soldier
does indeed go into the battle field with the knowledge that he may well
die.  He assumes this risk with a willingness to die for things important to
him and to the nation he stands for.  He may not want to die, but it's a
possibility he faces and he assumes that risk.

A race car driver also faces death in his career.  He does so with far
different motivation though.  His is a pursuit of the things that interest
him.  That's a far cry from the sacrificial nature of what a soldier does.
To compare Earnhardt dying on a race track to that which a soldier does is
ridiculous in the least, and nearing the level of insulting to those who do
put themselves in harm's way in the interest of protecting others.

Earnhardt paid no "ultimate" price.  There was no investment.  He went out
and raced because he like to race.  Just what was the noble cause within the
world of racing that Earnhardt died for?  In what way did he or any other
driver who died on the track earn the words "those who have died have given
the ultimate price for our sport"?  They did not give anything.  Their
deaths were not willing acts on their part.

I liked watching Earnhardt and Orr and Bonnett and Fireball Roberts race, as
well as a host of other drivers.  To elevate any of these guys by applying
heroic wording to their deaths though, is taking fan adoration to new
heights.

-Mike-

 
 
 

Dale Earnhardt: Good-bye or Good Riddance?

Post by Chri » Thu, 08 Nov 2001 10:01:07

WELL SAID!!!!!!!

--
Chris G.
2000 Jeep TJ

Quote:



> > no soldier goes to war intending to die in battle. yet they gae the
> ulimate
> > price for our freedom.  likewise no races goes on the track intending to
> die on
> > the track.  but those who have died have given the ultimate price for
our
> > sport.

> It would be considerate if you would include the quoted text in your
> replies, so that we can know precisely what you're referring to.  I'm
going
> to assume that you're replying to my comments since I did write a reply
> about Earnhardt not having sacrificed himself.  If I'm incorrect in this
> assumption, then you can ignore the following comments.

> There is a huge difference between a soldier and a race driver.  A soldier
> does indeed go into the battle field with the knowledge that he may well
> die.  He assumes this risk with a willingness to die for things important
to
> him and to the nation he stands for.  He may not want to die, but it's a
> possibility he faces and he assumes that risk.

> A race car driver also faces death in his career.  He does so with far
> different motivation though.  His is a pursuit of the things that interest
> him.  That's a far cry from the sacrificial nature of what a soldier does.
> To compare Earnhardt dying on a race track to that which a soldier does is
> ridiculous in the least, and nearing the level of insulting to those who
do
> put themselves in harm's way in the interest of protecting others.

> Earnhardt paid no "ultimate" price.  There was no investment.  He went out
> and raced because he like to race.  Just what was the noble cause within
the
> world of racing that Earnhardt died for?  In what way did he or any other
> driver who died on the track earn the words "those who have died have
given
> the ultimate price for our sport"?  They did not give anything.  Their
> deaths were not willing acts on their part.

> I liked watching Earnhardt and Orr and Bonnett and Fireball Roberts race,
as
> well as a host of other drivers.  To elevate any of these guys by applying
> heroic wording to their deaths though, is taking fan adoration to new
> heights.

> -Mike-


 
 
 

Dale Earnhardt: Good-bye or Good Riddance?

Post by -v- » Thu, 08 Nov 2001 22:53:57


Quote:



> > no soldier goes to war intending to die in battle. yet they gae the
> ulimate
> > price for our freedom.  likewise no races goes on the track intending to
> die on
> > the track.  but those who have died have given the ultimate price for
our
> > sport.

> It would be considerate if you would include the quoted text in your
> replies, so that we can know precisely what you're referring to.  I'm
going
> to assume that you're replying to my comments since I did write a reply
> about Earnhardt not having sacrificed himself.  If I'm incorrect in this
> assumption, then you can ignore the following comments.

> There is a huge difference between a soldier and a race driver.  A soldier
> does indeed go into the battle field with the knowledge that he may well
> die.  He assumes this risk with a willingness to die for things important
to
> him and to the nation he stands for.  He may not want to die, but it's a
> possibility he faces and he assumes that risk.

> A race car driver also faces death in his career.  He does so with far
> different motivation though.  His is a pursuit of the things that interest
> him.  That's a far cry from the sacrificial nature of what a soldier does.
> To compare Earnhardt dying on a race track to that which a soldier does is
> ridiculous in the least, and nearing the level of insulting to those who
do
> put themselves in harm's way in the interest of protecting others.

> Earnhardt paid no "ultimate" price.  There was no investment.  He went out
> and raced because he like to race.  Just what was the noble cause within
the
> world of racing that Earnhardt died for?  In what way did he or any other
> driver who died on the track earn the words "those who have died have
given
> the ultimate price for our sport"?  They did not give anything.  Their
> deaths were not willing acts on their part.

> I liked watching Earnhardt and Orr and Bonnett and Fireball Roberts race,
as
> well as a host of other drivers.  To elevate any of these guys by applying
> heroic wording to their deaths though, is taking fan adoration to new
> heights.

> -Mike-


Thanks for injecting rational thought here.
--
-v-
Go #8 #20 #29