Does Americans know how to pronounce "Paraguay" & "Uruguay"?

Does Americans know how to pronounce "Paraguay" & "Uruguay"?

Post by pushbutto » Tue, 18 Jun 2002 01:21:21


What about Eyerak & Eyeran :-)
 
 
 

Does Americans know how to pronounce "Paraguay" & "Uruguay"?

Post by Michael A. Kna » Tue, 18 Jun 2002 01:15:33

Quote:

> Hmmm? Is it the case that all along
> these sport "journalists" just didn't know
> how to pronounce the words "Paraguay" > and "Uruguay", just another
corruption
> of a word by folks lacking a basic
> education? But with a society as closed, > and comprising of people as
> geographically illiterate and clueless as
> the yanks, it's no wonder. The only time
> that most of them ever heard the words
> "Paraguay" and "Uruguay" is during the
> World Cup. <Pathetic>

Um, perhaps you should bone up on your English grammar, and not type a
blatant grammatical error in THE SUBJECT LINE OF YOUR POST, before
nit-picking the evil, hated Yanquis for not pronouncing "Paraguay" and
"Uruguay" correctly.

For the record, "Americans" would be a third-person plural noun; while
there is very little conjugation of verbs in whatever tense or mood or
person in modern English, the third-person singular does add an "s" to
the action verb (or "has" / "is" in perfect or passive situations) in
the present tense.  OTOH, the other five "persons", including the
third-person plural, do not add an "s" to the verb.

Therefore, the construction "Does Americans know how to pronounce..." is
grammatically incorrect, and therefore you end up making a complete fool
out of yourself.

mak

-----------------------------------
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Shameful (l)user of WebTV since 1997
-----------------------------------
Q: What's one of the most popular pick-up lines used by men at
Psychoanalyst gatherings?

A: "My, what a Freudian slip you're wearing!"
-----------------------------------

 
 
 

Does Americans know how to pronounce "Paraguay" & "Uruguay"?

Post by Pe6p » Tue, 18 Jun 2002 01:57:47

Quote:
>What about Eyerak & Eyeran :-)

any relations to Eyeore? ;)

 
 
 

Does Americans know how to pronounce "Paraguay" & "Uruguay"?

Post by sjevi » Tue, 18 Jun 2002 02:03:47

Quote:

> What about Eyerak & Eyeran :-)

It depends on the mood of the speaker :) sometimes "I ran" sometimes "I
run".
 
 
 

Does Americans know how to pronounce "Paraguay" & "Uruguay"?

Post by Chris Boy » Tue, 18 Jun 2002 04:00:26

Snaps killed six kittens after typing this:

Quote:
> On Sun, 16 Jun 2002 09:19:57 GMT, Chris Boyd

>>Hortical killed six kittens after typing this:

>>> The only time that most of them ever heard the words
>>> "Paraguay" and "Uruguay" is during the World Cup. <Pathetic>

>>We gringos are allowed a few words since the Spanish speaking
>>populations of Florida, Texas, and the Southwest butcher 90% of
>>English.

> Hey fok joo man.

I've actually heard white guys from up North say "Juh-lop-in-oh" for
jalepeno.

And I kid you not, in Missouri I heard someone say "tore-till-uh" for
tortilla.

Bleah!

 
 
 

Does Americans know how to pronounce "Paraguay" & "Uruguay"?

Post by Nate50 » Tue, 18 Jun 2002 06:06:14

Quote:

>I have noticed that Americans usually pronounce the words "Paraguay"
>and "Uruguay", with a stress on the ending "a", instead of it being
>silent. This is in contrast to the way it is done in the rest of the
>world. The first time I noticed this was around the 94 World cup. Well,
>since then, I have heard "journalists" on TV pronounce these words
>stressing the "a", often enough to lead me to assume that this is the
>accepted pronunciation in America.  
>Well, now I am beginning to rethink that viewpoint. I noticed now, that
>we are at the mid-point of the World cup, some of the American
>"journalists" are pronouncing Paraguay and Uruguay "differently" (the
>way the rest of the world does), with the "a" silent. Case in point is
>ESPN's World cup2night host, Rob Stone,  a previous
>"American-style-pronouncer.  Hmmm? Is it the case that all along these
>sport "journalists" just didn't know how to pronounce the words
>"Paraguay"  and "Uruguay", just another corruption of a word by folks
>lacking a basic education? But with a society as closed, and comprising
>of people as geographically illiterate and clueless as the yanks, it's
>no wonder. The only time that most of them ever heard the words
>"Paraguay" and "Uruguay" is during the World Cup. <Pathetic>

"Look at this country!  U-Are-Gay...."

"I'm like the man who single handedly built the rocket
and went to the moon.  What was his name, Apollo Creed?"
--Homer Simpson

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Does Americans know how to pronounce "Paraguay" & "Uruguay"?

Post by Bruce McIntyr » Tue, 18 Jun 2002 06:57:33


Quote:


> Uruguay and Paraguay are pronounced this way primarily because all
languages
> have different linguistic rules than Spanish does. Thus in the English
> tongue the right pronunciation is "PAH-rah-gway" and "YOU-roo-gway".

> We'll let you know when Englishmen get upset at Germans pronouncing our
> country's name, "Ehn-glahnt".

Some of the British commentators are actually pronouncing "Jorge" as
"George" in the play-by-play when they forget.  I think there is a fair
sized difference between British English and North American English: in
North America there seems to be more of a move toward recognition of foreign
words when deciding pronunciation.  I would pronounce both with a "gwai"
ending, not "guay", and I often say "OO-roo-gwai."  (Isn't that how
Uruguayans say it?)  Might be a bit too politically correct, but it doesn't
hurt anyone.

--
.-----------------------.----------------------------------.

|  6636 Dow Ave., #203  |  "OO-ga-shaw-ca, OO-ga-shaw-ca"  |
|   Burnaby BC CANADA   | ACBL Unit 430 President, 2000-02 |
| V5H 3C9  604/438-9735 |     editor, the Matchpointer     |

Quote:
}-----------------------?----------------------------------{

|      Yamaha WX5 wind-synthesizer virtuoso-in-training    |
`----------------------------------------------------------
 
 
 

Does Americans know how to pronounce "Paraguay" & "Uruguay"?

Post by Pe6p » Tue, 18 Jun 2002 07:28:24

Quote:
>Some of the British commentators are actually pronouncing "Jorge" as
>"George" in the play-by-play when they forget.  I think there is a fair
>sized difference between British English and North American English: in
>North America there seems to be more of a move toward recognition of foreign
>words when deciding pronunciation.  I would pronounce both with a "gwai"
>ending, not "guay", and I often say "OO-roo-gwai."  (Isn't that how
>Uruguayans say it?)  Might be a bit too politically correct, but it doesn't
>hurt anyone.

I'd expect US English speakers to be more clued up about Spanish than European
English speakers, since we don't really have a hispanic communtiy in Britain or
Ireland
 
 
 

Does Americans know how to pronounce "Paraguay" & "Uruguay"?

Post by Michael Babya » Tue, 18 Jun 2002 07:54:09

: Some of the British commentators are actually pronouncing "Jorge" as
: "George" in the play-by-play when they forget.  I think there is a fair
: sized difference between British English and North American English: in
: North America there seems to be more of a move toward recognition of foreign
: words when deciding pronunciation.  I would pronounce both with a "gwai"
: ending, not "guay", and I often say "OO-roo-gwai."  (Isn't that how
: Uruguayans say it?)  Might be a bit too politically correct, but it doesn't
: hurt anyone.

Absolutely correct about British not even attempting to adopt the sounds
of the other language.  In the States, it's a mixed bag.  The English, for
example, pronounce Taco as Tack-o, rather than the short tah ko, which to
an American ear, sounds ludicrous.  Then there was an Elnglish
acquaintance who asked, "how far is Philadelphia to Pittsboro?"  I
replied,. "You mean Pittsburgh?"  He said, "yes, Pittsboro."

Mike Babyak

 
 
 

Does Americans know how to pronounce "Paraguay" & "Uruguay"?

Post by Edmund Lew » Tue, 18 Jun 2002 09:26:44


Quote:

> > I have noticed that Americans usually pronounce the words "Paraguay"
> > and "Uruguay", with a stress on the ending "a", instead of it being
> > silent. This is in contrast to the way it is done in the rest of the
> > world. The first time I noticed this was around the 94 World cup. Well,
> > since then, I have heard "journalists" on TV pronounce these words
> > stressing the "a", often enough to lead me to assume that this is the
> > accepted pronunciation in America.  

> Paraguay is pronounced, PA-RUH-GWAY
> Uruguay is pronounced, YOO-RUH-GWAY.

 In England we have a footie manager and TV pundit (Martin O'Neill)
who has spent the entire World Cup lecturing us that it should be
'OO-RUH-GWAY' because he asked someone how it's said in Spanish and
that's what he was told. When he's not doing that, he's lecturing us
why Emile Heskey is the best thing since sliced bread. 'Nuff said.
Quote:
> The guys on ESPN et al. are a bunch of posers for the BBC.

 
 
 

Does Americans know how to pronounce "Paraguay" & "Uruguay"?

Post by Ronnie » Tue, 18 Jun 2002 10:26:00

Quote:



> > I have noticed that Americans usually pronounce the words "Paraguay"
> > and "Uruguay", with a stress on the ending "a", instead of it being
> > silent. This is in contrast to the way it is done in the rest of the
> > world. The first time I noticed this was around the 94 World cup. Well,
> > since then, I have heard "journalists" on TV pronounce these words
> > stressing the "a", often enough to lead me to assume that this is the
> > accepted pronunciation in America.
> > Well, now I am beginning to rethink that viewpoint. I noticed now, that
> > we are at the mid-point of the World cup, some of the American
> > "journalists" are pronouncing Paraguay and Uruguay "differently" (the
> > way the rest of the world does), with the "a" silent. Case in point is
> > ESPN's World cup2night host, Rob Stone,  a previous
> > "American-style-pronouncer.  Hmmm? Is it the case that all along these
> > sport "journalists" just didn't know how to pronounce the words
> > "Paraguay"  and "Uruguay", just another corruption of a word by folks
> > lacking a basic education? But with a society as closed, and comprising
> > of people as geographically illiterate and clueless as the yanks, it's
> > no wonder. The only time that most of them ever heard the words
> > "Paraguay" and "Uruguay" is during the World Cup. <Pathetic>

> Not that trolls need to be mollycoddled, but this particular rant intrigued
> me.

> Uruguay and Paraguay are pronounced this way primarily because all languages
> have different linguistic rules than Spanish does. Thus in the English
> tongue the right pronunciation is "PAH-rah-gway" and "YOU-roo-gway".

> We'll let you know when Englishmen get upset at Germans pronouncing our
> country's name, "Ehn-glahnt".

Both of you passionate soccer fans should follow the example of your
truly pasionate and creative fellow soccefan: cover yourselves in
gasoline and set yourselves on fire.

HTH

 
 
 

Does Americans know how to pronounce "Paraguay" & "Uruguay"?

Post by gollu » Tue, 18 Jun 2002 10:42:49

While I think your ranting is typical anti-american sentiment; as an
American who has traveled abroad, I understand the source of said sentiment.
However, it is really the same as for the Americans you write about:
ignorance.  That being said, here's a joke in the same vein:

What do you call someone who speaks two languages?

Bilingual.
What do you call someone who speaks three languages?

Trilingual.
What do you call someone who speaks many languages?

Multilingual.
What do you call someone who speaks one language?

American.
;-)


Quote:
> I have noticed that Americans usually pronounce the words "Paraguay"
> and "Uruguay", with a stress on the ending "a", instead of it being
> silent. This is in contrast to the way it is done in the rest of the
> world. The first time I noticed this was around the 94 World cup. Well,
> since then, I have heard "journalists" on TV pronounce these words
> stressing the "a", often enough to lead me to assume that this is the
> accepted pronunciation in America.
> Well, now I am beginning to rethink that viewpoint. I noticed now, that
> we are at the mid-point of the World cup, some of the American
> "journalists" are pronouncing Paraguay and Uruguay "differently" (the
> way the rest of the world does), with the "a" silent. Case in point is
> ESPN's World cup2night host, Rob Stone,  a previous
> "American-style-pronouncer.  Hmmm? Is it the case that all along these
> sport "journalists" just didn't know how to pronounce the words
> "Paraguay"  and "Uruguay", just another corruption of a word by folks
> lacking a basic education? But with a society as closed, and comprising
> of people as geographically illiterate and clueless as the yanks, it's
> no wonder. The only time that most of them ever heard the words
> "Paraguay" and "Uruguay" is during the World Cup. <Pathetic>

 
 
 

Does Americans know how to pronounce "Paraguay" & "Uruguay"?

Post by Victoria Barret » Tue, 18 Jun 2002 11:08:52


Quote:
> Some of the British commentators are actually pronouncing "Jorge" as
> "George" in the play-by-play when they forget.

It depends if they are doing so for a Spanish or Portuguese player.

Hor-heh (Sp)

Zhor-zhe (Por)

Thus, if they do so for Rui Jorge by pronouncing it like Zhor-zhe, they are
right. Actually, it is much more common to see Rui Jorge's name
automatically pronounced as if it were Spanish, than not. As a Luso-lover,
that irritates me every time.

Quote:
> I think there is a fair
> sized difference between British English and North American English: in
> North America there seems to be more of a move toward recognition of
foreign
> words when deciding pronunciation.  I would pronounce both with a "gwai"
> ending, not "guay", and I often say "OO-roo-gwai."  (Isn't that how
> Uruguayans say it?)  Might be a bit too politically correct, but it
doesn't
> hurt anyone.

I think it's the impulse to do so that intrigues me. It's only less
well-known countries which seem to find it an insult, redolent of an
inferiority complex. As mentioned, no one in England finds it galling when
Germans pronounce our country as it is phonetically in their tongue.