The World Cup, should we care whether Americans get it.

The World Cup, should we care whether Americans get it.

Post by Edson Arantes No Do Nasciemient » Tue, 02 Jul 2002 11:10:21


We have come to the end of another World cup, and the world was treated
to an experience which?most Americans have no concept of, as they have
no sport to provide the same level of e***ment and passion as soccer.
American sports are known for its boring and scripted nature, and? is
mostly lacking in things which are inherent in soccer, such as skills,
coordination, physical endurance, intellect, and accountability.

Skill and finesse?are integral to soccer. Unlike gridiron football,
where most of the players owe their presence on the field to their
physical attributes.  Except in rare cases (Barry Sanders), running
backs rely purely on speed and brute force (Emmit Smith). Ice hockey is
one American's sports which truly provides the opportunity for skill
and finesse, but this like all other American sports, was derailed with
the obsession for unnecessary physical roughness, so we are left with
only a bastardized version of field hockey.
Physical endurance is essential in soccer, where players have to run
continuously over a 120 yard field, there are no time outs, and only
three substitutions are allowed.?Contrast this with basketball where
players jog up and down a short court and are rotated continuously.
Accountability is severely lacking in American sports. In basketball,
after a round of fisticuffs, a player is thrown out of the game, only
to be replaced by another. The player is then allowed to show up to
play in the following game. Players know that their ejection won't
really hurt the team, only a slight dent in their bank account. No such
luxury is afforded in soccer.? Players kicked out of a?game cannot be
replaced and miss the following game. In Ice Hockey, after having a
lengthy ***y feud, players may be ejected. In soccer, they would be
banned for life.
Vision and decision making is also an integral part of soccer, unlike
American sports where the coach call plays through time outs.

Unlike Pele, I don't share the same?vision of Americans
embracing?soccer en masse. This will only result in a bastardization of
the sport as they strive to get it to suit them. Over the years, the
desire to force?soccer on Americans has led to experimentations with
disastrous effects on the game. The halfside line is one notable
blunder. Americans, generally, are not reared in a society to get it,
when it comes to soccer. The game is best left to develop in America at
it's own pace, which really means that only individuals who have been
exposed to the game at an early age will be able to appreciate it. The
relative success of the American team at this World Cup will not make
the game explode, but it will engender more youth to accept the game.
More and more of these youths will grow up to be the Eric Wynalda, Tony
Meola, London Donovan and Demarcus Beasly. Perhaps over the next
hundred years or so, enough of these youths will be spawned for one to
say that America, as a society, finally gets it. The present ***
mass, however, never will, and should not be expected to, get it.

 
 
 

The World Cup, should we care whether Americans get it.

Post by Rich » Tue, 02 Jul 2002 11:30:47



Quote:
> We have come to the end of another World cup, and the world was treated
> to an experience which most Americans have no concept of, as they have
> no sport to provide the same level of e***ment and passion as soccer.
> American sports are known for its boring and scripted nature, and is
> mostly lacking in things which are inherent in soccer, such as skills,
> coordination, physical endurance, intellect, and accountability.

> Skill and finesse are integral to soccer. Unlike gridiron football,
> where most of the players owe their presence on the field to their
> physical attributes.  Except in rare cases (Barry Sanders), running
> backs rely purely on speed and brute force (Emmit Smith). Ice hockey is
> one American's sports which truly provides the opportunity for skill
> and finesse, but this like all other American sports, was derailed with
> the obsession for unnecessary physical roughness, so we are left with
> only a bastardized version of field hockey.
> Physical endurance is essential in soccer, where players have to run
> continuously over a 120 yard field, there are no time outs, and only
> three substitutions are allowed. Contrast this with basketball where
> players jog up and down a short court and are rotated continuously.
> Accountability is severely lacking in American sports. In basketball,
> after a round of fisticuffs, a player is thrown out of the game, only
> to be replaced by another. The player is then allowed to show up to
> play in the following game. Players know that their ejection won't
> really hurt the team, only a slight dent in their bank account. No such
> luxury is afforded in soccer. Players kicked out of a game cannot be
> replaced and miss the following game. In Ice Hockey, after having a
> lengthy ***y feud, players may be ejected. In soccer, they would be
> banned for life.

Uhm, dood. Soccer players fight like girls... If they show any fighting
skills they get signed on to kick in the NFL.

- Show quoted text -

Quote:
> Vision and decision making is also an integral part of soccer, unlike
> American sports where the coach call plays through time outs.

> Unlike Pele, I don't share the same vision of Americans
> embracing soccer en masse. This will only result in a bastardization of
> the sport as they strive to get it to suit them. Over the years, the
> desire to force soccer on Americans has led to experimentations with
> disastrous effects on the game. The halfside line is one notable
> blunder. Americans, generally, are not reared in a society to get it,
> when it comes to soccer. The game is best left to develop in America at
> it's own pace, which really means that only individuals who have been
> exposed to the game at an early age will be able to appreciate it. The
> relative success of the American team at this World Cup will not make
> the game explode, but it will engender more youth to accept the game.
> More and more of these youths will grow up to be the Eric Wynalda, Tony
> Meola, London Donovan and Demarcus Beasly. Perhaps over the next
> hundred years or so, enough of these youths will be spawned for one to
> say that America, as a society, finally gets it. The present ***
> mass, however, never will, and should not be expected to, get it.


 
 
 

The World Cup, should we care whether Americans get it.

Post by John Lundquis » Tue, 02 Jul 2002 11:44:12

Soccer in America;
    Soccer is catching on in America.  It is now the number two sport in the
US.  Only Basketball has more young players.  I think you will see better
American players as years go by.  However, never expect Americans fans to be
like the soccer thugs of England.  We realize it is only a game and nothing
more.  And never expect Americans to assassinate a soccer player for making
a mistake.  We realize everyone has a bad day now and then.  We also know
that sports are to be enjoyed for the enjoyment of the game and not some
National pride thing that shows other countries we are better than they are.
All it shows is that on a given day, one athlete was better than another.
The next day it might be the complete opposite.  But that is the beauty of
sport.

--
John Lundquist

--

 
 
 

The World Cup, should we care whether Americans get it.

Post by Bennett Don » Tue, 02 Jul 2002 11:36:06

Well said................................
I dont really care if they never get it............Let them stay isolated in
the dark in there little world.......................there
loss.....................



Quote:
> We have come to the end of another World cup, and the world was treated
> to an experience which most Americans have no concept of, as they have
> no sport to provide the same level of e***ment and passion as soccer.
> American sports are known for its boring and scripted nature, and is
> mostly lacking in things which are inherent in soccer, such as skills,
> coordination, physical endurance, intellect, and accountability.

> Skill and finesse are integral to soccer. Unlike gridiron football,
> where most of the players owe their presence on the field to their
> physical attributes.  Except in rare cases (Barry Sanders), running
> backs rely purely on speed and brute force (Emmit Smith). Ice hockey is
> one American's sports which truly provides the opportunity for skill
> and finesse, but this like all other American sports, was derailed with
> the obsession for unnecessary physical roughness, so we are left with
> only a bastardized version of field hockey.
> Physical endurance is essential in soccer, where players have to run
> continuously over a 120 yard field, there are no time outs, and only
> three substitutions are allowed. Contrast this with basketball where
> players jog up and down a short court and are rotated continuously.
> Accountability is severely lacking in American sports. In basketball,
> after a round of fisticuffs, a player is thrown out of the game, only
> to be replaced by another. The player is then allowed to show up to
> play in the following game. Players know that their ejection won't
> really hurt the team, only a slight dent in their bank account. No such
> luxury is afforded in soccer. Players kicked out of a game cannot be
> replaced and miss the following game. In Ice Hockey, after having a
> lengthy ***y feud, players may be ejected. In soccer, they would be
> banned for life.
> Vision and decision making is also an integral part of soccer, unlike
> American sports where the coach call plays through time outs.

> Unlike Pele, I don't share the same vision of Americans
> embracing soccer en masse. This will only result in a bastardization of
> the sport as they strive to get it to suit them. Over the years, the
> desire to force soccer on Americans has led to experimentations with
> disastrous effects on the game. The halfside line is one notable
> blunder. Americans, generally, are not reared in a society to get it,
> when it comes to soccer. The game is best left to develop in America at
> it's own pace, which really means that only individuals who have been
> exposed to the game at an early age will be able to appreciate it. The
> relative success of the American team at this World Cup will not make
> the game explode, but it will engender more youth to accept the game.
> More and more of these youths will grow up to be the Eric Wynalda, Tony
> Meola, London Donovan and Demarcus Beasly. Perhaps over the next
> hundred years or so, enough of these youths will be spawned for one to
> say that America, as a society, finally gets it. The present ***
> mass, however, never will, and should not be expected to, get it.

 
 
 

The World Cup, should we care whether Americans get it.

Post by Thoma » Tue, 02 Jul 2002 12:06:18

I think US soccer can do even better than 02 world cup  while
remaining a niche sport.

Of course, that won't sit well with underachieving soccer-mad
countries but what do US care?

On Mon, 01 Jul 2002 02:44:12 GMT, "John Lundquist"

Quote:

>Soccer in America;
>    Soccer is catching on in America.  It is now the number two sport in the
>US.  Only Basketball has more young players.  I think you will see better
>American players as years go by.  However, never expect Americans fans to be
>like the soccer thugs of England.  We realize it is only a game and nothing
>more.  And never expect Americans to assassinate a soccer player for making
>a mistake.  We realize everyone has a bad day now and then.  We also know
>that sports are to be enjoyed for the enjoyment of the game and not some
>National pride thing that shows other countries we are better than they are.
>All it shows is that on a given day, one athlete was better than another.
>The next day it might be the complete opposite.  But that is the beauty of
>sport.

>--
>John Lundquist

 
 
 

The World Cup, should we care whether Americans get it.

Post by Bennett Don » Tue, 02 Jul 2002 12:15:15

american somoa


Quote:
> I think US soccer can do even better than 02 world cup  while
> remaining a niche sport.

> Of course, that won't sit well with underachieving soccer-mad
> countries but what do US care?

> On Mon, 01 Jul 2002 02:44:12 GMT, "John Lundquist"

> >Soccer in America;
> >    Soccer is catching on in America.  It is now the number two sport in
the
> >US.  Only Basketball has more young players.  I think you will see better
> >American players as years go by.  However, never expect Americans fans to
be
> >like the soccer thugs of England.  We realize it is only a game and
nothing
> >more.  And never expect Americans to assassinate a soccer player for
making
> >a mistake.  We realize everyone has a bad day now and then.  We also know
> >that sports are to be enjoyed for the enjoyment of the game and not some
> >National pride thing that shows other countries we are better than they
are.
> >All it shows is that on a given day, one athlete was better than another.
> >The next day it might be the complete opposite.  But that is the beauty
of
> >sport.

> >--
> >John Lundquist

 
 
 

The World Cup, should we care whether Americans get it.

Post by HASM » Tue, 02 Jul 2002 12:28:30

Trolling for sure, but ...

Quote:
> However, never expect Americans fans to be like the soccer thugs of
> England.  We realize it is only a game and nothing more.

Just go to google and do a couple of searches like

  "riot staples center"
  "riot world series"
  "riot stanley cup"

and you'll find out how those pesky English soccer thugs don't miss a
chance to come over the pond to celebrate after American sports games. The
"soccer thugs of England" phenomenon would happen if gridiron was the
number one sport over there, and is only connected to soccer by accident.
With so many soccer games being played all over the world there's bound to
be some trouble once in a while, as there is over here, one would need to
talk percentages to even attempt to make a comparison.  

Quote:
> And never expect Americans to assassinate a soccer player for making a
> mistake.

Yup, and that's an annual ritual in all the other 200+ countries for
sure. Back home we boil them in hot oil during the summer festivities.

Quote:
> We also know that sports are to be enjoyed for the enjoyment of the game
> and not some National pride thing that shows other countries we are
> better than they are.

That's because the USA is isolated from international competition in most
(media) relevant sports, otherwise you would see it too.  And when you do
compete it is just as bad. I find it hard to believe you don't watch
television during the Olympics where USA is #1, crash the USSR in Lake
Placid, we were robbed in the basketball final by those commies, etc, never
ever comes up.

-- HASM

 
 
 

The World Cup, should we care whether Americans get it.

Post by HASM » Tue, 02 Jul 2002 12:35:12

Quote:

>> And never expect Americans to assassinate a soccer player for making a
>> mistake.

And don't forget that this is just as stupid as if one were to generalize
and say that "in America parents of young athletes kill coaches/other
parents for making the mistake of not letting them play."

When it comes to sports, everywhere in the world, no matter what sport,
some people can and will go crazy.  Walk over here to any field where
there's a little league going on and you'll see it more often than not.  I
referee soccer games, and I'm always appalled at the behavior of parents on
the side line.

Statements like the above are completely unnecessary.

-- HASM

 
 
 

The World Cup, should we care whether Americans get it.

Post by Frank Downe » Tue, 02 Jul 2002 13:14:47



Quote:
> We have come to the end of another World cup, and the world was treated
> to an experience which most Americans have no concept of, as they have
> no sport to provide the same level of e***ment and passion as soccer.

I love soccer, but there's other sports that provide e***ment and passion
*especially on the highest levels* (which the World Cup is).

 Ice hockey is

Quote:
> one American's sports which truly provides the opportunity for skill
> and finesse,

Well, for one thing, ice hockey is Canadian <G>. For a second thing, you're
comparing the NHL to the World Cup. That's apples and oranges. You want
skill and finesse--well, did you *see* the Olympics? *That* is more
comparable to the WC--since it has national teams composed of the best
players in the world--and the Olympic hockey tournament was *breathtaking*.
All the skill and finesse (not to mention e***ment and passion) that you
want.

 Contrast this with basketball where

Quote:
> players jog up and down a short court and are rotated continuously.

.....and who take shots throught the whole game that would make your average
soccer player flop around like Greg Louganis.

Quote:
> Unlike Pele, I don't share the same vision of Americans
> embracing soccer en masse.

I don't either--and, although, as I said, I love soccer, one of the
reasons--and I said this in another post--that soccer will never be embraced
en masse is the overweening arrogant preachiness of the soccer-lovers.  It
is a *hell* of a turn-off, and this post is a *perfect* example. It *is*
possible to extoll the many virtues of soccer without self-righteously
running down every other sport ever invented.

To this guy, and others who think like him--you want soccer to have more
acceptance in the USA? Then SHUT UP already.

Even if you *don't* care if soccer gets more acceptance in the USA, shut up
all the same. It's just as bad as the blind knee-jerk soccer haters.

--Frank

 
 
 

The World Cup, should we care whether Americans get it.

Post by Steven Sza » Tue, 02 Jul 2002 14:19:02

Ignorant view.
The issue is not whether soccer is more superior to US sports or not, but
the fact that the world's #2 sports event (after the Olympics) is going to
capture more and more US audience in the future because of the sheer gravity
of the event, and that's eventually going to translate into $$$ for european
clubs, and going to propel the sport to new heights.  Traditional US
attitudes towards the rest of the world were always ambivalent in all areas,
not only sports, and you can't judge all americans the way you do in this
stupid post, because you prove yourself worst than the proverbial yankee
redneck you clearly identify all americans with, beside the fact that you
have a generally poor understanding of american sports.


Quote:
> We have come to the end of another World cup, and the world was treated
> to an experience which most Americans have no concept of, as they have
> no sport to provide the same level of e***ment and passion as soccer.
> American sports are known for its boring and scripted nature, and is
> mostly lacking in things which are inherent in soccer, such as skills,
> coordination, physical endurance, intellect, and accountability.

> Skill and finesse are integral to soccer. Unlike gridiron football,
> where most of the players owe their presence on the field to their
> physical attributes.  Except in rare cases (Barry Sanders), running
> backs rely purely on speed and brute force (Emmit Smith). Ice hockey is
> one American's sports which truly provides the opportunity for skill
> and finesse, but this like all other American sports, was derailed with
> the obsession for unnecessary physical roughness, so we are left with
> only a bastardized version of field hockey.
> Physical endurance is essential in soccer, where players have to run
> continuously over a 120 yard field, there are no time outs, and only
> three substitutions are allowed. Contrast this with basketball where
> players jog up and down a short court and are rotated continuously.
> Accountability is severely lacking in American sports. In basketball,
> after a round of fisticuffs, a player is thrown out of the game, only
> to be replaced by another. The player is then allowed to show up to
> play in the following game. Players know that their ejection won't
> really hurt the team, only a slight dent in their bank account. No such
> luxury is afforded in soccer. Players kicked out of a game cannot be
> replaced and miss the following game. In Ice Hockey, after having a
> lengthy ***y feud, players may be ejected. In soccer, they would be
> banned for life.
> Vision and decision making is also an integral part of soccer, unlike
> American sports where the coach call plays through time outs.

> Unlike Pele, I don't share the same vision of Americans
> embracing soccer en masse. This will only result in a bastardization of
> the sport as they strive to get it to suit them. Over the years, the
> desire to force soccer on Americans has led to experimentations with
> disastrous effects on the game. The halfside line is one notable
> blunder. Americans, generally, are not reared in a society to get it,
> when it comes to soccer. The game is best left to develop in America at
> it's own pace, which really means that only individuals who have been
> exposed to the game at an early age will be able to appreciate it. The
> relative success of the American team at this World Cup will not make
> the game explode, but it will engender more youth to accept the game.
> More and more of these youths will grow up to be the Eric Wynalda, Tony
> Meola, London Donovan and Demarcus Beasly. Perhaps over the next
> hundred years or so, enough of these youths will be spawned for one to
> say that America, as a society, finally gets it. The present ***
> mass, however, never will, and should not be expected to, get it.

 
 
 

The World Cup, should we care whether Americans get it.

Post by glug » Tue, 02 Jul 2002 15:32:42


Quote:
> We have come to the end of another World cup, and the world was treated
> to an experience which?most Americans have no concept of, as they have
> no sport to provide the same level of e***ment and passion as soccer.
> American sports are known for its boring and scripted nature, and? is
> mostly lacking in things which are inherent in soccer, such as skills,
> coordination, physical endurance, intellect, and accountability.

It's not the skills of the players that makes soccer so popular in
countries other than the USA, it is the boring lives that non-Americans
live to find e***ment from the scintillating scores of 1 to 0 and the
like from no less than 90! minutes of effort.
Americans expect successful efforts rather than good, interesting but
failed tries. This is why the USA is a success while soccer mad
countries are largely good, interesting but relative failures.

Thank you and have an interesting, good and ... strike that...
Have a nice day. :)

 
 
 

The World Cup, should we care whether Americans get it.

Post by Bennett Don » Tue, 02 Jul 2002 15:53:40

your my hero..................



Quote:
> > We have come to the end of another World cup, and the world was treated
> > to an experience which most Americans have no concept of, as they have
> > no sport to provide the same level of e***ment and passion as soccer.
> > American sports are known for its boring and scripted nature, and is
> > mostly lacking in things which are inherent in soccer, such as skills,
> > coordination, physical endurance, intellect, and accountability.

> It's not the skills of the players that makes soccer so popular in
> countries other than the USA, it is the boring lives that non-Americans
> live to find e***ment from the scintillating scores of 1 to 0 and the
> like from no less than 90! minutes of effort.
> Americans expect successful efforts rather than good, interesting but
> failed tries. This is why the USA is a success while soccer mad
> countries are largely good, interesting but relative failures.

> Thank you and have an interesting, good and ... strike that...
> Have a nice day. :)

 
 
 

The World Cup, should we care whether Americans get it.

Post by Bennett Don » Tue, 02 Jul 2002 16:18:58

1 in 4 people on earth watched the final in TV....

Finally, if you cannot get to a television set, there is the Internet. This
World Cup has become an Internet phenomenon, with FIFAworldcup.com becoming
the most successful sports event website ever, overtaking the previous
record holders, the Salt Lake City Olympic Winter Games just one week after
the start of the World Cup. Since kick-off, a staggering 1.452 billion page
views have been registered (as of 21st June). The record number of page
views on a day was 127.9 million on 18th June. (Source:
FIFAworldcup.com/Yahoo!)

Obviously all from failing boring non american countries................all
feral............



Quote:
> > We have come to the end of another World cup, and the world was treated
> > to an experience which most Americans have no concept of, as they have
> > no sport to provide the same level of e***ment and passion as soccer.
> > American sports are known for its boring and scripted nature, and is
> > mostly lacking in things which are inherent in soccer, such as skills,
> > coordination, physical endurance, intellect, and accountability.

> It's not the skills of the players that makes soccer so popular in
> countries other than the USA, it is the boring lives that non-Americans
> live to find e***ment from the scintillating scores of 1 to 0 and the
> like from no less than 90! minutes of effort.
> Americans expect successful efforts rather than good, interesting but
> failed tries. This is why the USA is a success while soccer mad
> countries are largely good, interesting but relative failures.

> Thank you and have an interesting, good and ... strike that...
> Have a nice day. :)

 
 
 

The World Cup, should we care whether Americans get it.

Post by res1a41 » Tue, 02 Jul 2002 16:51:05

What an ignorant generalization.   Why don't you check all the facts before you
post this crap.  The  Colombian player  got into an argument with another person
at a bar at 2:30 AM.   Your stupid remark is like me saying American wives get
***ed by football players and the Football players get away with ***.
Think about it.
Quote:

> Soccer in America;
>  .  And never expect Americans to assassinate a soccer player for making
> a mistake.

> --
> John Lundquist

> --