Freedon of speech and behavior

Freedon of speech and behavior

Post by Shawn Pickrel » Sun, 07 Jul 2002 11:07:43


Quote:

> I prefer not to even attempt to argue with anybody who equates freedom
> of (public) drug use with personal freedom.  Just my preference.  call
> it what you want.

There are other freedoms than the right to toke up in public.

In fact, I would rate that freedom as fairly unimportant in the
grand scheme of things.

The Libertarian Party has skewered itself on the *** war.
Ron Paul and other thoughtful sorts who would prefer to focus
efforts on foreign policy and economic policy, were skewered
by Libertarian purists because he didn't focus enough, allegedly,
on the drug war.

The Libertarian Party candidate for ***ia Lt. Governour last
year was a one-issue candidate (hold a referendum to legalise
***.) I left sorry for the legitimate candidate for Governor
from that Party.

Shawn Pickrell

 
 
 

Freedon of speech and behavior

Post by Sugapab » Sun, 07 Jul 2002 11:54:21

Quote:
>One other thing, someone else was talking about how they were blessed
>by being able to watch bobbies thanks to their funding fathers unlike other
>countries. I mean come on....?!  

What's a bobbie? :)

On that note, what's a "funding" father?  :)

Anyways, your point, however inarticulate it may be, is valid.  Many
Americans are raised to believe that the US is the pinnacle of
freedom.  Whether it is or not, some because of this, do think that
most other countries are somehow lacking when it comes to the freedoms
enjoyed here.

Oh, BTW....alt.politics or something next time.

_______________________________________________________

http://www.sugapablo.com

To email me, remove "Sugapablo-" from my email address.

 
 
 

Freedon of speech and behavior

Post by napie » Sun, 07 Jul 2002 13:12:32

Quote:

> In France you can get arrested for wearing a shirt that has a pot leaf
> on it.  Granted, it isn't always enforced, but the law is on the
> books.  Western Europe covers a lot more countries than just
> Holland....you can't do the same things in Sweden or Austria that you
> can do in Holland.

There are hundreds of ridiculous laws that aren't enforced in the U.S. as
well. I remember seeing some things you could get arrested for in various
states. Hilarious stuff.

 
 
 

Freedon of speech and behavior

Post by Mongoloi » Sun, 07 Jul 2002 14:38:32

Quote:

>And yes, I've been to the US, wondering if the people who say those diarhea
>inciting  things have ever been to W. Europe?

it's a well-known fact that 90% of americans do not hold passport. :)
 
 
 

Freedon of speech and behavior

Post by Victoria Barret » Sun, 07 Jul 2002 16:56:57


Quote:
> What's a bobbie? :)

I'm thinking whoever it was misspelled ***y. No wait, that's just a hope
not a thought.

Quote:
> On that note, what's a "funding" father?  :)

Pshaw. My dad [tm] of course. :)
 
 
 

Freedon of speech and behavior

Post by Victoria Barret » Sun, 07 Jul 2002 18:35:30


Quote:
> I heard that in the states it is forbidden to burn the national flag
> or bibles. True or not?

Never heard that one. Although I think if you did, you'd get the ***beat
out of you.

BTW, the US is one of the few countries where you can take a dollar bill in
public and set fire to it, jump on it, tear it up into a million pieces.
That's outlawed in many places, including Switzerland where a woman did so
at an airport a few years back, and was immediately arrested.

 
 
 

Freedon of speech and behavior

Post by David Tiemrot » Sun, 07 Jul 2002 19:42:40


Quote:
>x-no-archive: yes




>> > x-no-archive: yes



>> > > Just wondering, this is supposed to be a good intentioned question
>>  without
>> > > malice.
>> > > Why is it that when I read posts by Americans about freedoms they really
>> > > seem to be convinced that noone else has freedom of speech&whatever
>> > > other then them, when in fact Western European countries give more
>>  freedom?
>> > > Just walk the streets of Amsterdam and you'll see tons of Americans
>>  having lots
>> > > of fun enjoying freedom for the first time:)
>> > > One other thing, someone else was talking about how they were blessed
>> > > by being able to watch bobbies thanks to their funding fathers unlike
>>  other
>> > > countries. I mean come on....?!  We see more bobbies in morning shows on
>> > > TV channels then Americans do over the whole month on TV(where
>> > > showing sex seems to be politicaly incorrect or whatever, but showing
>>  someoe
>> > > getting their head blown off is total fun and acceptable - for the
>>  serier mold
>> > > them while they're young).

>> > > Well im really wondering about all this...

>> > troll.....*plonk*

>> Heh. He actually has some points.

>Uh, ok.  From what I can tell his main point is that people have
>greater personal freedom in Amsterdam than they do in the U.S. because
>they can smoke dope in public and we can't.  

Close but not. I'm betting if you read it instead of skim it you'll be
able to recognise his actual point.

Quote:
>> Not sure what's trolling about that.

>Oh c'mon, its not obvious to you?  How long have you been on usenet?

A troll isn't just someone who says something you don't agree with,
Ed.

David.
------------------------------------------------------------------
Well, if crimefighters fight crime and firefighters fight fire, what
do freedom fighters fight? -- George Carlin
------------------------------------------------------------------

 
 
 

Freedon of speech and behavior

Post by Chris Francisc » Sun, 07 Jul 2002 21:50:08

Quote:

> I heard that in the states it is forbidden to burn the national flag
> or bibles. True or not?

Utterly false. The Supreme Court (by an uncomfortably narrow margin) ruled
flag-burning prohibitions unconstitutional in Texas v. Johnson and then
reaffirmed its stance when Congress, at Bush, Sr.'s request, tried a
federal law. I've never heard anything about Bibles.

Chris

 
 
 

Freedon of speech and behavior

Post by Chris Horyms » Mon, 08 Jul 2002 00:03:47


Quote:

> >And yes, I've been to the US, wondering if the people who say those diarhea
> >inciting  things have ever been to W. Europe?

> it's a well-known fact that 90% of americans do not hold passport. :)

You sir, are the weakest link.

Chris

 
 
 

Freedon of speech and behavior

Post by Rich McCormac » Mon, 08 Jul 2002 00:17:33

Quote:


> >And yes, I've been to the US, wondering if the people who say those diarhea
> >inciting  things have ever been to W. Europe?

> it's a well-known fact that 90% of americans do not hold passport. :)

Most Americans will never have need for a passport; but, don't pity
them too much, they have over 3,717,000 square miles (that's over
9,626,000 sq km for the metric folk) to roam about without need
of ANY citizenship documentation...and, with proof they are U.S.
citizens, they can add over 4,612,000 square miles of international
travel (11,945,000 sq km) for a total of over 8,329,000 square miles
(21,572,000 sq km)...and that does not include the Caribbean and
Central American countries that don't require passports from U.S.
citizens.  I doubt one can find such freedom to travel anywhere
else in the world.  

--
"Peace, commerce and honest friendship with all nations--entangling
alliances with none..."  -- Thomas Jefferson


Who is Rich McCormack?  Find out at...
http://home.pacbell.net/macknet/

 
 
 

Freedon of speech and behavior

Post by Gerrit Stol » Mon, 08 Jul 2002 01:21:39

On Sat, 6 Jul 2002 05:35:30 -0400, "Victoria Barrett"

Quote:



>> I heard that in the states it is forbidden to burn the national flag
>> or bibles. True or not?

>Never heard that one. Although I think if you did, you'd get the ***beat
>out of you.

>BTW, the US is one of the few countries where you can take a dollar bill in
>public and set fire to it, jump on it, tear it up into a million pieces.

:-))))) Wow, she must have been a magician.

Quote:
>That's outlawed in many places, including Switzerland where a woman did so
>at an airport a few years back, and was immediately arrested.

I wonder wether she was arrested for burning a dollar bill or for
setting anything on fire in a public building, which, I assume, would
be forbidden in most countries, even though arresting anybody for that
*offense* would be a bit harsh, imo.

Gerrit

 
 
 

Freedon of speech and behavior

Post by Gerrit Stol » Mon, 08 Jul 2002 01:37:50



Quote:
>On Fri, 5 Jul 2002 12:59:42 -0700, "Lloyd Devonshire"

>>The thing I was talking about was rather someone who told me that in the
>>Netherlands (now I wonder if it's Germany) that even criticizing that
>>country's constitution can get one arrested. Not plotting to bring down the
>>government, not collecting C4 and submachine guns, but simply criticizing.

>It's not the Netherlands. There is a lot of discussion going on about
>changing the constitution and nobody gets arrested for critizing it.
>The most bizar thing you can get yourself arrested for in Holland is
>insulting the queen.

*** the German constitution. Well, actually, it's the basic law, but
*** it nonetheless. It's not worth the paper, it is written on. Now
can anybody please call the police and have me arrested ;-)
There are quite a few European countries where critisizing the
constition can result in arrests. None of them is a true democracy or
even a democracy in disguise. Turkey comes to mind, some of the
follow-up states of the former Yugoslavia. Slovakia, Belorussia,
Russia proper.

Gerrit

 
 
 

Freedon of speech and behavior

Post by Bruce Scott T » Mon, 08 Jul 2002 02:18:16


Quote:

>*** the German constitution. Well, actually, it's the basic law, but
>*** it nonetheless. It's not worth the paper, it is written on. Now
>can anybody please call the police and have me arrested ;-)
>There are quite a few European countries where critisizing the
>constition can result in arrests. None of them is a true democracy or
>even a democracy in disguise. Turkey comes to mind, some of the
>follow-up states of the former Yugoslavia. Slovakia, Belorussia,
>Russia proper.

Can you burn the flag in Germany?

--
cu,
Bruce

drift wave turbulence:  http://SportToday.org/~bds/

 
 
 

Freedon of speech and behavior

Post by Diabl » Mon, 08 Jul 2002 12:29:29


Quote:



> > >And yes, I've been to the US, wondering if the people who say those
diarhea
> > >inciting  things have ever been to W. Europe?

> > it's a well-known fact that 90% of americans do not hold passport. :)

> Most Americans will never have need for a passport; but, don't pity
> them too much, they have over 3,717,000 square miles (that's over
> 9,626,000 sq km for the metric folk) to roam about without need
> of ANY citizenship documentation...and, with proof they are U.S.
> citizens, they can add over 4,612,000 square miles of international
> travel (11,945,000 sq km) for a total of over 8,329,000 square miles
> (21,572,000 sq km)...and that does not include the Caribbean and
> Central American countries that don't require passports from U.S.
> citizens.  I doubt one can find such freedom to travel anywhere
> else in the world.

It's the quality of travel that counts.
 
 
 

Freedon of speech and behavior

Post by Mongoloi » Mon, 08 Jul 2002 14:43:11

says you the missing link. :)
Quote:



>> >And yes, I've been to the US, wondering if the people who say those diarhea
>> >inciting  things have ever been to W. Europe?

>> it's a well-known fact that 90% of americans do not hold passport. :)

>You sir, are the weakest link.