Arrogant Nigerians II

Arrogant Nigerians II

Post by Salaam Yitbare » Mon, 29 Jun 1998 04:00:00


I wrote the following eight days ago, and unfortunately, our prodigal
brothers decided to prove me right.

No sense blaming in the goalkeeper.  Rufai played alright actually--every
goalkeeper is spilling the ball in this WC--Smeichel dropped it once today,
but of course, no Nigerian attacker went for the rebound, and the Danish
defenders had it covered in case they did.

No sense blaming strategy.  You can always second-guess strategy, but Bora is
a competent coach, and really, this match was not very tactical--it was old
style attack and defend football.

No sense blaming the choice of players.  The eleven players chosen and the
substitutes have more than enough talent and experience to beat most teams.
Besides, none of us is close enough to the teams to know the exact abilities
of the players.

All I know is I say Nigerian players on the field with no fight.  Did you see
how the French players fought to avoid penalties with Paraguay?  Djorkaeff
ran miles in that game and struggled so much to produce a goal that his play
was became ragged and laboured.  But Nigeria, no.  A forward loses the ball,
and instead of chasing, he just stands there.  His teammates don't chase
since they are busy chastising him!

So, although I may seem arrogant from what I write :), I admit that I don't
know enough to question the coach or methods, etc.  All I saw was French and
Paraguayans dying on the field for honour, and Nigerians coasting.  And don't
take my word for it.  BBC commentators, whose insults don't usually extend
beyond 'naive in defence', expressed puzzlement at the Nigerians' attitude.
The ex-player who was commenting remarked that "..this is the World Cup, the
final six***, and the players don't seem to realize this!"

I'll be supporting them in 2002.

Salaam Yitbarek

Quote:

> The Nigerians had me, a dedicated supporter of all African teams,
> wishing Bulgaria would score in the last minute to teach them a good
> lesson.  And they almost did!  There are few things more unsightly than
> arrogance without substance.  The Nigerians have never got close to
> winning a World Cup.  In fact, this is only their second one.  How can
> such non-achievers be so arrogant?  Perhaps they are simply displaying a
> common trait of upstarts--a fear that comes from lack of confidence and
> inferiority complex, that is masked by an outward show of bravado.

> From the start of the match, it was clear that Nigeria would dominate in
> every aspect.  But they insisted on being nonchalant and looking as if
> they did not want to be playing.  A good example of this is Okocha.  He
> gave the ball away at least ten times without being rushed (the
> Nigerians were given plenty of time on the ball).  And he still kept
> trying some untidy tricks that were never going to work.  It's okay to
> try a trick or two, even if you're being, IMHO, but if it doesn't work,
> your opponent has shown you up, and you should not try it again.  If you
> do, it better work.  What was that one Okocha messed up, only to have a
> swing at the deflected ball?  A real classy player would be embarrassed
> at having tried something and having it look so ugly, and then
> compounding the embarrassment by shooting an ugly shot wide of the
> goal.  But not Okocha--he just kept on trying to dribble past people.

> And how about Kanu and Finidi, two players that I had awarded the
> honorary title of non-Nigerian because of their intelligent and
> beautiful play for Ajax.  They got into the act, too.  Kanu beats a man
> easily on the wing, as is his habit, and then he stupidly tries to beat
> another when it was just not on.  The way the defender was positioned,
> Maradona wouldn't have tried to do that.  And Finidi looked like he was
> in a trance in the second half.  Next to Okocha, he was the second
> biggest black hole in the Nigerian team.

> Mind you, I'm all for tricks and relaxed and beautiful football.  Brazil
> '82 are one of my favourite teams of all time.  But when they got ahead
> and wanted to show off, they did it properly, that is, with some
> intelligence.  They would play one-touch and try to score beautiful
> goals with a series of one-touch moves, and a midfielder running in at
> the end for the final touch.  When they tried to dribble by people and
> were stopped, they wouldn't just stand their and soak up their
> embarrassment--they would try to get the ball back so that they could do
> some more showing off.  They would move forward with the ball and people
> would make nice runs.

> There was none of that from Nigeria.  The Nigerian definition of looking
> good seems to be standing still with the ball and looking disinterested,
> and occasionally giving the other team the ball.  Ah, it was a
> disgusting display.  I won't bother saying that I hope they are taught a
> lesson.  I know they will lose eventually to Italy or Germany, or even a
> lesser team.  And then they will say that they played better but
> couldn't finish or something silly like that, and go back to their
> palaces in Lagos.  Sigh!  But I'll probably still be cheering for my
> prodigal African brothers.  What can I do?!

> As for specific players in the team, Ikpeba is the man.  His talent
> isn't great--he is not natural with the ball, but self-taught.  But his
> attitude is excellent.  I like that he once said Nigeria lacks the guts
> that Cameroon have, and that he criticised his team for poor preparation
> and scolded the "mafia" clique of players in the team just one week
> before the WC.  That he still started for Nigeria in spite of such
> behaviour is a sign that the mafia is not very strong, and that there is
> hope for the team.

> The two left-sided players--Babayaro and Lawal--played very well, too,
> especially Babayaro.  Amokachi, Ikpeba, and Yekini played alright, too.
> I am still in shock over Yekini's good play in this tournament.

> Good that Uche is out.  Maybe a youngster without such a swollen head
> will do better.

> I feel better now.

> Salaam Yitbarek

[ Attached Message ]

From:
To:
Date: Sat, 20 Jun 1998 14:35:44 -0400
Local: Sat, Jun 20 1998 2:35 pm
Subject: Arrogant Nigerians
The Nigerians had me, a dedicated supporter of all African teams,
wishing Bulgaria would score in the last minute to teach them a good
lesson.  And they almost did!  There are few things more unsightly than
arrogance without substance.  The Nigerians have never got close to
winning a World Cup.  In fact, this is only their second one.  How can
such non-achievers be so arrogant?  Perhaps they are simply displaying a
common trait of upstarts--a fear that comes from lack of confidence and
inferiority complex, that is masked by an outward show of bravado.

Quote:
>From the start of the match, it was clear that Nigeria would dominate in

every aspect.  But they insisted on being nonchalant and looking as if
they did not want to be playing.  A good example of this is Okocha.  He
gave the ball away at least ten times without being rushed (the
Nigerians were given plenty of time on the ball).  And he still kept
trying some untidy tricks that were never going to work.  It's okay to
try a trick or two, even if you're being, IMHO, but if it doesn't work,
your opponent has shown you up, and you should not try it again.  If you
do, it better work.  What was that one Okocha messed up, only to have a
swing at the deflected ball?  A real classy player would be embarrassed
at having tried something and having it look so ugly, and then
compounding the embarrassment by shooting an ugly shot wide of the
goal.  But not Okocha--he just kept on trying to dribble past people.

And how about Kanu and Finidi, two players that I had awarded the
honorary title of non-Nigerian because of their intelligent and
beautiful play for Ajax.  They got into the act, too.  Kanu beats a man
easily on the wing, as is his habit, and then he stupidly tries to beat
another when it was just not on.  The way the defender was positioned,
Maradona wouldn't have tried to do that.  And Finidi looked like he was
in a trance in the second half.  Next to Okocha, he was the second
biggest black hole in the Nigerian team.

Mind you, I'm all for tricks and relaxed and beautiful football.  Brazil
'82 are one of my favourite teams of all time.  But when they got ahead
and wanted to show off, they did it properly, that is, with some
intelligence.  They would play one-touch and try to score beautiful
goals with a series of one-touch moves, and a midfielder running in at
the end for the final touch.  When they tried to dribble by people and
were stopped, they wouldn't just stand their and soak up their
embarrassment--they would try to get the ball back so that they could do
some more showing off.  They would move forward with the ball and people
would make nice runs.

There was none of that from Nigeria.  The Nigerian definition of looking
good seems to be standing still with the ball and looking disinterested,
and occasionally giving the other team the ball.  Ah, it was a
disgusting display.  I won't bother saying that I hope they are taught a
lesson.  I know they will lose eventually to Italy or Germany, or even a
lesser team.  And then they will say that they played better but
couldn't finish or something silly like that, and go back to their
palaces in Lagos.  Sigh!  But I'll probably still be cheering for my
prodigal African brothers.  What can I do?!

As for specific players in the team, Ikpeba is the man.  His talent
isn't great--he is not natural with the ball, but self-taught.  But his
attitude is excellent.  I like that he once said Nigeria lacks the guts
that Cameroon have, and that he criticised his team for poor preparation
and scolded the "mafia" clique of players in the team just one week
before the WC.  That he still started for Nigeria in spite of such
behaviour is a sign that the mafia is not very strong, and that there is
hope for the team.

The two left-sided players--Babayaro and Lawal--played very well, too,
especially Babayaro.  Amokachi, Ikpeba, and Yekini played alright, too.
I am still in shock over Yekini's good play in this tournament.

Good that Uche is out.  Maybe a youngster without such a swollen head
will do better.

I feel better now.

Salaam Yitbarek

 
 
 

Arrogant Nigerians II

Post by Some Perso » Mon, 29 Jun 1998 04:00:00

You gotta blame Rufai. He gave up 2 bad rebounds on kicks that should
have been caught, which ended up in goals (2-0, 4-0). The worst one
being the 4-0 goal which was the easiest you're ever going to get. Take
away those 2 goals and you've got a whole new game and more life in the
Nigerians.
I do agree with everything else.

Quote:

> I wrote the following eight days ago, and unfortunately, our prodigal
> brothers decided to prove me right.

> No sense blaming in the goalkeeper.  Rufai played alright actually--every
> goalkeeper is spilling the ball in this WC--Smeichel dropped it once today,
> but of course, no Nigerian attacker went for the rebound, and the Danish
> defenders had it covered in case they did.

> No sense blaming strategy.  You can always second-guess strategy, but Bora is
> a competent coach, and really, this match was not very tactical--it was old
> style attack and defend football.

> No sense blaming the choice of players.  The eleven players chosen and the
> substitutes have more than enough talent and experience to beat most teams.
> Besides, none of us is close enough to the teams to know the exact abilities
> of the players.

> All I know is I say Nigerian players on the field with no fight.  Did you see
> how the French players fought to avoid penalties with Paraguay?  Djorkaeff
> ran miles in that game and struggled so much to produce a goal that his play
> was became ragged and laboured.  But Nigeria, no.  A forward loses the ball,
> and instead of chasing, he just stands there.  His teammates don't chase
> since they are busy chastising him!

> So, although I may seem arrogant from what I write :), I admit that I don't
> know enough to question the coach or methods, etc.  All I saw was French and
> Paraguayans dying on the field for honour, and Nigerians coasting.  And don't
> take my word for it.  BBC commentators, whose insults don't usually extend
> beyond 'naive in defence', expressed puzzlement at the Nigerians' attitude.
> The ex-player who was commenting remarked that "..this is the World Cup, the
> final six***, and the players don't seem to realize this!"

> I'll be supporting them in 2002.

> Salaam Yitbarek


> > The Nigerians had me, a dedicated supporter of all African teams,
> > wishing Bulgaria would score in the last minute to teach them a good
> > lesson.  And they almost did!  There are few things more unsightly than
> > arrogance without substance.  The Nigerians have never got close to
> > winning a World Cup.  In fact, this is only their second one.  How can
> > such non-achievers be so arrogant?  Perhaps they are simply displaying a
> > common trait of upstarts--a fear that comes from lack of confidence and
> > inferiority complex, that is masked by an outward show of bravado.

> > From the start of the match, it was clear that Nigeria would dominate in
> > every aspect.  But they insisted on being nonchalant and looking as if
> > they did not want to be playing.  A good example of this is Okocha.  He
> > gave the ball away at least ten times without being rushed (the
> > Nigerians were given plenty of time on the ball).  And he still kept
> > trying some untidy tricks that were never going to work.  It's okay to
> > try a trick or two, even if you're being, IMHO, but if it doesn't work,
> > your opponent has shown you up, and you should not try it again.  If you
> > do, it better work.  What was that one Okocha messed up, only to have a
> > swing at the deflected ball?  A real classy player would be embarrassed
> > at having tried something and having it look so ugly, and then
> > compounding the embarrassment by shooting an ugly shot wide of the
> > goal.  But not Okocha--he just kept on trying to dribble past people.

> > And how about Kanu and Finidi, two players that I had awarded the
> > honorary title of non-Nigerian because of their intelligent and
> > beautiful play for Ajax.  They got into the act, too.  Kanu beats a man
> > easily on the wing, as is his habit, and then he stupidly tries to beat
> > another when it was just not on.  The way the defender was positioned,
> > Maradona wouldn't have tried to do that.  And Finidi looked like he was
> > in a trance in the second half.  Next to Okocha, he was the second
> > biggest black hole in the Nigerian team.

> > Mind you, I'm all for tricks and relaxed and beautiful football.  Brazil
> > '82 are one of my favourite teams of all time.  But when they got ahead
> > and wanted to show off, they did it properly, that is, with some
> > intelligence.  They would play one-touch and try to score beautiful
> > goals with a series of one-touch moves, and a midfielder running in at
> > the end for the final touch.  When they tried to dribble by people and
> > were stopped, they wouldn't just stand their and soak up their
> > embarrassment--they would try to get the ball back so that they could do
> > some more showing off.  They would move forward with the ball and people
> > would make nice runs.

> > There was none of that from Nigeria.  The Nigerian definition of looking
> > good seems to be standing still with the ball and looking disinterested,
> > and occasionally giving the other team the ball.  Ah, it was a
> > disgusting display.  I won't bother saying that I hope they are taught a
> > lesson.  I know they will lose eventually to Italy or Germany, or even a
> > lesser team.  And then they will say that they played better but
> > couldn't finish or something silly like that, and go back to their
> > palaces in Lagos.  Sigh!  But I'll probably still be cheering for my
> > prodigal African brothers.  What can I do?!

> > As for specific players in the team, Ikpeba is the man.  His talent
> > isn't great--he is not natural with the ball, but self-taught.  But his
> > attitude is excellent.  I like that he once said Nigeria lacks the guts
> > that Cameroon have, and that he criticised his team for poor preparation
> > and scolded the "mafia" clique of players in the team just one week
> > before the WC.  That he still started for Nigeria in spite of such
> > behaviour is a sign that the mafia is not very strong, and that there is
> > hope for the team.

> > The two left-sided players--Babayaro and Lawal--played very well, too,
> > especially Babayaro.  Amokachi, Ikpeba, and Yekini played alright, too.
> > I am still in shock over Yekini's good play in this tournament.

> > Good that Uche is out.  Maybe a youngster without such a swollen head
> > will do better.

> > I feel better now.

> > Salaam Yitbarek

>     ---------------------------------------------------------------

> Subject: Arrogant Nigerians
> Date: Sat, 20 Jun 1998 14:35:44 -0400

> Newsgroups: rec.sport.soccer

> The Nigerians had me, a dedicated supporter of all African teams,
> wishing Bulgaria would score in the last minute to teach them a good
> lesson.  And they almost did!  There are few things more unsightly than
> arrogance without substance.  The Nigerians have never got close to
> winning a World Cup.  In fact, this is only their second one.  How can
> such non-achievers be so arrogant?  Perhaps they are simply displaying a
> common trait of upstarts--a fear that comes from lack of confidence and
> inferiority complex, that is masked by an outward show of bravado.

> >From the start of the match, it was clear that Nigeria would dominate in
> every aspect.  But they insisted on being nonchalant and looking as if
> they did not want to be playing.  A good example of this is Okocha.  He
> gave the ball away at least ten times without being rushed (the
> Nigerians were given plenty of time on the ball).  And he still kept
> trying some untidy tricks that were never going to work.  It's okay to
> try a trick or two, even if you're being, IMHO, but if it doesn't work,
> your opponent has shown you up, and you should not try it again.  If you
> do, it better work.  What was that one Okocha messed up, only to have a
> swing at the deflected ball?  A real classy player would be embarrassed
> at having tried something and having it look so ugly, and then
> compounding the embarrassment by shooting an ugly shot wide of the
> goal.  But not Okocha--he just kept on trying to dribble past people.

> And how about Kanu and Finidi, two players that I had awarded the
> honorary title of non-Nigerian because of their intelligent and
> beautiful play for Ajax.  They got into the act, too.  Kanu beats a man
> easily on the wing, as is his habit, and then he stupidly tries to beat
> another when it was just not on.  The way the defender was positioned,
> Maradona wouldn't have tried to do that.  And Finidi looked like he was
> in a trance in the second half.  Next to Okocha, he was the second
> biggest black hole in the Nigerian team.

> Mind you, I'm all for tricks and relaxed and beautiful football.  Brazil
> '82 are one of my favourite teams of all time.  But when they got ahead
> and wanted to show off, they did it properly, that is, with some
> intelligence.  They would play one-touch and try to score beautiful
> goals with a series of one-touch moves, and a midfielder running in at
> the end for the final touch.  When they tried to dribble by people and
> were stopped, they wouldn't just stand their and soak up their
> embarrassment--they would try to get the ball back so that they could do
> some more showing off.  They would move forward with the ball and people
> would make nice runs.

> There was none of that from Nigeria.  The Nigerian definition of looking
> good seems to be standing still with the ball and looking disinterested,
> and occasionally giving the other team the ball.  Ah, it was a
> disgusting display.  I won't bother saying that I hope they are taught a
> lesson.  I know they will lose eventually to Italy or Germany, or even a
> lesser team.  And then they will say that they

...

read more »

 
 
 

Arrogant Nigerians II

Post by Robert Chapm » Wed, 01 Jul 1998 04:00:00


When the opposition scores from their first two real attacks and are up by
2 goals after 10 minutes, most teams get disheartened.  This is what
happened.  They would have been running harder if they were only a goal
down.  While you may criticise them for this, it's always been the case
that flair teams usually lose some fight when they get into serious
difficulty.

Rob

Quote:
> This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
> --------------CFCE8503CE2C4ECFC81FE2AA
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
> Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

> I wrote the following eight days ago, and unfortunately, our prodigal
> brothers decided to prove me right.

> No sense blaming in the goalkeeper.  Rufai played alright actually--every
> goalkeeper is spilling the ball in this WC--Smeichel dropped it once today,
> but of course, no Nigerian attacker went for the rebound, and the Danish
> defenders had it covered in case they did.

> No sense blaming strategy.  You can always second-guess strategy, but Bora is
> a competent coach, and really, this match was not very tactical--it was old
> style attack and defend football.

> No sense blaming the choice of players.  The eleven players chosen and the
> substitutes have more than enough talent and experience to beat most teams.
> Besides, none of us is close enough to the teams to know the exact abilities
> of the players.

> All I know is I say Nigerian players on the field with no fight.  Did you see
> how the French players fought to avoid penalties with Paraguay?  Djorkaeff
> ran miles in that game and struggled so much to produce a goal that his play
> was became ragged and laboured.  But Nigeria, no.  A forward loses the ball,
> and instead of chasing, he just stands there.  His teammates don't chase
> since they are busy chastising him!

> So, although I may seem arrogant from what I write :), I admit that I don't
> know enough to question the coach or methods, etc.  All I saw was French and
> Paraguayans dying on the field for honour, and Nigerians coasting.  And don't
> take my word for it.  BBC commentators, whose insults don't usually extend
> beyond 'naive in defence', expressed puzzlement at the Nigerians' attitude.
> The ex-player who was commenting remarked that "..this is the World Cup, the
> final six***, and the players don't seem to realize this!"

> I'll be supporting them in 2002.

> Salaam Yitbarek


> > The Nigerians had me, a dedicated supporter of all African teams,
> > wishing Bulgaria would score in the last minute to teach them a good
> > lesson.  And they almost did!  There are few things more unsightly than
> > arrogance without substance.  The Nigerians have never got close to
> > winning a World Cup.  In fact, this is only their second one.  How can
> > such non-achievers be so arrogant?  Perhaps they are simply displaying a
> > common trait of upstarts--a fear that comes from lack of confidence and
> > inferiority complex, that is masked by an outward show of bravado.

> > From the start of the match, it was clear that Nigeria would dominate in
> > every aspect.  But they insisted on being nonchalant and looking as if
> > they did not want to be playing.  A good example of this is Okocha.  He
> > gave the ball away at least ten times without being rushed (the
> > Nigerians were given plenty of time on the ball).  And he still kept
> > trying some untidy tricks that were never going to work.  It's okay to
> > try a trick or two, even if you're being, IMHO, but if it doesn't work,
> > your opponent has shown you up, and you should not try it again.  If you
> > do, it better work.  What was that one Okocha messed up, only to have a
> > swing at the deflected ball?  A real classy player would be embarrassed
> > at having tried something and having it look so ugly, and then
> > compounding the embarrassment by shooting an ugly shot wide of the
> > goal.  But not Okocha--he just kept on trying to dribble past people.

> > And how about Kanu and Finidi, two players that I had awarded the
> > honorary title of non-Nigerian because of their intelligent and
> > beautiful play for Ajax.  They got into the act, too.  Kanu beats a man
> > easily on the wing, as is his habit, and then he stupidly tries to beat
> > another when it was just not on.  The way the defender was positioned,
> > Maradona wouldn't have tried to do that.  And Finidi looked like he was
> > in a trance in the second half.  Next to Okocha, he was the second
> > biggest black hole in the Nigerian team.

> > Mind you, I'm all for tricks and relaxed and beautiful football.  Brazil
> > '82 are one of my favourite teams of all time.  But when they got ahead
> > and wanted to show off, they did it properly, that is, with some
> > intelligence.  They would play one-touch and try to score beautiful
> > goals with a series of one-touch moves, and a midfielder running in at
> > the end for the final touch.  When they tried to dribble by people and
> > were stopped, they wouldn't just stand their and soak up their
> > embarrassment--they would try to get the ball back so that they could do
> > some more showing off.  They would move forward with the ball and people
> > would make nice runs.

> > There was none of that from Nigeria.  The Nigerian definition of looking
> > good seems to be standing still with the ball and looking disinterested,
> > and occasionally giving the other team the ball.  Ah, it was a
> > disgusting display.  I won't bother saying that I hope they are taught a
> > lesson.  I know they will lose eventually to Italy or Germany, or even a
> > lesser team.  And then they will say that they played better but
> > couldn't finish or something silly like that, and go back to their
> > palaces in Lagos.  Sigh!  But I'll probably still be cheering for my
> > prodigal African brothers.  What can I do?!

> > As for specific players in the team, Ikpeba is the man.  His talent
> > isn't great--he is not natural with the ball, but self-taught.  But his
> > attitude is excellent.  I like that he once said Nigeria lacks the guts
> > that Cameroon have, and that he criticised his team for poor preparation
> > and scolded the "mafia" clique of players in the team just one week
> > before the WC.  That he still started for Nigeria in spite of such
> > behaviour is a sign that the mafia is not very strong, and that there is
> > hope for the team.

> > The two left-sided players--Babayaro and Lawal--played very well, too,
> > especially Babayaro.  Amokachi, Ikpeba, and Yekini played alright, too.
> > I am still in shock over Yekini's good play in this tournament.

> > Good that Uche is out.  Maybe a youngster without such a swollen head
> > will do better.

> > I feel better now.

> > Salaam Yitbarek

> --------------CFCE8503CE2C4ECFC81FE2AA
> Content-Type: message/rfc822
> Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
> Content-Disposition: inline


> Date: Sat, 20 Jun 1998 14:35:44 -0400

> X-Mailer: Mozilla 4.04 [en] (Win95; I)
> MIME-Version: 1.0
> Newsgroups: rec.sport.soccer
> Subject: Arrogant Nigerians
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
> Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

> The Nigerians had me, a dedicated supporter of all African teams,
> wishing Bulgaria would score in the last minute to teach them a good
> lesson.  And they almost did!  There are few things more unsightly than
> arrogance without substance.  The Nigerians have never got close to
> winning a World Cup.  In fact, this is only their second one.  How can
> such non-achievers be so arrogant?  Perhaps they are simply displaying a
> common trait of upstarts--a fear that comes from lack of confidence and
> inferiority complex, that is masked by an outward show of bravado.

> >From the start of the match, it was clear that Nigeria would dominate in
> every aspect.  But they insisted on being nonchalant and looking as if
> they did not want to be playing.  A good example of this is Okocha.  He
> gave the ball away at least ten times without being rushed (the
> Nigerians were given plenty of time on the ball).  And he still kept
> trying some untidy tricks that were never going to work.  It's okay to
> try a trick or two, even if you're being, IMHO, but if it doesn't work,
> your opponent has shown you up, and you should not try it again.  If you
> do, it better work.  What was that one Okocha messed up, only to have a
> swing at the deflected ball?  A real classy player would be embarrassed
> at having tried something and having it look so ugly, and then
> compounding the embarrassment by shooting an ugly shot wide of the
> goal.  But not Okocha--he just kept on trying to dribble past people.

> And how about Kanu and Finidi, two players that I had awarded the
> honorary title of non-Nigerian because of their intelligent and
> beautiful play for Ajax.  They got into the act, too.  Kanu beats a man
> easily on the wing, as is his habit, and then he stupidly tries to beat
> another when it was just not on.  The way the defender was positioned,
> Maradona wouldn't have tried to do that.  And Finidi looked like he was
> in a trance in the second half.  Next to Okocha, he was the second
> biggest black hole in the Nigerian team.

> Mind you, I'm all for tricks and relaxed and beautiful football.  Brazil
> '82 are one of my favourite teams of all time.  But when they got ahead
> and wanted to show off, they did it properly, that is, with some
> intelligence.  They would play one-touch and try to score beautiful
> goals with a series of one-touch moves, and a midfielder running in at
> the end for the final touch.  When they tried to dribble by people and
> were stopped, they wouldn't just stand their and soak up their
> embarrassment--they would try to get the ball back so that they

...

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Arrogant Nigerians II

Post by susan.. » Thu, 02 Jul 1998 04:00:00

Down 2 goals in 10 mins then you give up?????  Look at Chile.  They down 3
goals to Brazil.  They work hard and they score one. Then they immediately
pick the ball up from the net to save time.  This is real soccer.  Look at
Paragury. They are the weaker side.  They work hard for 100 mins.  They cried
after losing the golden goal.  This is real soccer.  Playing in World Cup is
all about heart.  Playing for their country, playing for the people of their
country.

I am very happy that Nigeria lose.  I don't have to see this kind ugry soccer
any more.  Nigeria sucks!!!



Quote:



> When the opposition scores from their first two real attacks and are up by
> 2 goals after 10 minutes, most teams get disheartened.  This is what
> happened.  They would have been running harder if they were only a goal
> down.  While you may criticise them for this, it's always been the case
> that flair teams usually lose some fight when they get into serious
> difficulty.

> Rob

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