Ferrari pit crew during Massa's 1st stop

Ferrari pit crew during Massa's 1st stop

Post by Frit » Wed, 15 Mar 2006 18:55:41


A little bit early for the 'missing tyre' bit?
Haven't seen that little action from a group of Italians in the desert
since North Africa in the early 1940's

--
Fritz

"See, in my line of work you got to keep repeating things over and over
and over again for the truth to sink in, to kind of catapult the
propaganda."- President George W. Bush

 
 
 

Ferrari pit crew during Massa's 1st stop

Post by Wifton Perc » Wed, 15 Mar 2006 21:08:35

The manager of the pit crew is a tough Englishman who Steve Matchett
referred to as a "tough Sgt Major drill sargent."  Matchett worked for
him.  His name is Nigel Stepney.

 
 
 

Ferrari pit crew during Massa's 1st stop

Post by Paul- » Wed, 15 Mar 2006 21:26:05

Quote:

> The manager of the pit crew is a tough Englishman who Steve Matchett
> referred to as a "tough Sgt Major drill sargent."  Matchett worked for
> him.  His name is Nigel Stepney.

What? Formula England has penetrated The Scuderia?

I hope Luca is closely monitoring Stepney's e-mails and his digital
camera...

--
Paul-B

 
 
 

Ferrari pit crew during Massa's 1st stop

Post by Botha » Wed, 15 Mar 2006 22:24:12

Quote:

> The manager of the pit crew is a tough Englishman who Steve Matchett
> referred to as a "tough Sgt Major drill sargent."  Matchett worked for
> him.  His name is Nigel Stepney.

Nigel Stepney is the cheating english *** who use to work at Benetton,
he retired years ago.
 
 
 

Ferrari pit crew during Massa's 1st stop

Post by Wifton Perc » Wed, 15 Mar 2006 23:58:45

Quote:


> > The manager of the pit crew is a tough Englishman who Steve Matchett
> > referred to as a "tough Sgt Major drill sargent."  Matchett worked for
> > him.  His name is Nigel Stepney.

> Nigel Stepney is the cheating english *** who use to work at Benetton,
> he retired years ago.

Steve Matchett said Stepney hired him at Benetton and he was tough old
bird.  He said that Stepney was the pit crew manager at the Scuderia
and the pit crew was going to catch hell after the Massa pit stop.
 
 
 

Ferrari pit crew during Massa's 1st stop

Post by Pete Fenelo » Thu, 16 Mar 2006 00:15:09

Quote:

> Steve Matchett said Stepney hired him at Benetton and he was tough old
> bird.  He said that Stepney was the pit crew manager at the Scuderia
> and the pit crew was going to catch hell after the Massa pit stop.

Stepney has been in the game for years - he's been in F1 since the 70s,
and he's been a chief mechanic since his Lotus days. He followed Elio de
Angelis there from Shadow, where both of them served their F1
apprenticeships, and ended up chief mechanic.  (Back then, mechanics did
often follow drivers round - Ermano Coughi followed Niki Lauda from
Ferrari to Brabham for example).

pete
--

 
 
 

Ferrari pit crew during Massa's 1st stop

Post by Wifton Perc » Thu, 16 Mar 2006 03:40:24

Quote:


> > Steve Matchett said Stepney hired him at Benetton and he was tough old
> > bird.  He said that Stepney was the pit crew manager at the Scuderia
> > and the pit crew was going to catch hell after the Massa pit stop.

> Stepney has been in the game for years - he's been in F1 since the 70s,
> and he's been a chief mechanic since his Lotus days. He followed Elio de
> Angelis there from Shadow, where both of them served their F1
> apprenticeships, and ended up chief mechanic.  (Back then, mechanics did
> often follow drivers round - Ermano Coughi followed Niki Lauda from
> Ferrari to Brabham for example).

> pete
> --


Thanks Pete.  I was sure he said he was there and not "he hired me at
Benetton and if he was running the Scuderia pit crew now - there would
be hell to pay after Massa's stop."   Either I was not paying attention
or Matchett and David Hobbs had the bar open early Sunday morning at
the Speed TV studios.

Speaking of bringing your mechanic with you : I think Fisi needs to go
out and hire his own mechanic or someone to break Flavio's knees.

Pat Symonds said that he did not believe in bad luck but Giancarlo may
change his mind.   Guess Pat never heard of Chris Amon or Johnny
Herbert.

 
 
 

Ferrari pit crew during Massa's 1st stop

Post by Pete Fenelo » Thu, 16 Mar 2006 04:42:31

Quote:

> Pat Symonds said that he did not believe in bad luck but Giancarlo may
> change his mind.   Guess Pat never heard of Chris Amon or Johnny
> Herbert.

It's "accepted wisdom" to say that Chris was terminally unlucky, but I
think to some extent he made a rod for his own back. He was terminally
disorganised and never fully in control of his temper; he stuck with
some terrible "lame ducks" (Gordon Fowell in particular, who designed
one of the plethora of crappy Tecnos and the Amon), and he turned down
moves that anyone with half a brain would've taken -- he left Ferrari
over the 69-70 close season because he thought he had to have a Cosworth
(even though he'd tested the flat-12); he was offered a third
(Marlboro!) Ferrari for 1974; Bernie offered him a Brabham mid-season
but he was perservering with his own shed of a car...

His early F1 years definitely showed that he had the talent, but he was
driving privateer entries...

Chris should've made his proper F1 breakthrough in '66 in a second
McLaren, but of course Bruce had dropped an absolute bollock by
choosing the short-stroke version of the big 4.2 Indy Ford as his
engine (quite why he thought a virtually torqueless version of an engine
optimised for speedways was going to work befuddles me!). It was
such a great gormless device that the team ran between zero and one
cars, and even that one was intermittently fitted with the gutless
(but at least lightweight and reliable) Serenissima (vaguely related
to ATS) V8. So his F1 career was on hold as he fiddled with the
GT40, which at least got him and Bruce a Le Mans win...

Amon was definitely hard done by in his time at Ferrari, at least
in F1; the V12 couldn't pull the skin off a rice pudding (or as
Amon said - "fruity noise; no horses") and certainly through his
whole time there the F1 programme was subsidiary to sports cars.
By '69 the Ferrari F1 presence was a placeholder, until the FIAT
investment.  He could've gone anywhere else...  He certainly *should*
have won races in '68-9, but the cars were unreliable. They were
unreliable because F1 wasn't top of Ferrari's list of priorities. That's
not bad luck; that's bad judgement.

His time at Matra was also interesting; from "having to" have a
Cosworth he decided that he "had to" have a V12. There wasn't too
much wrong with the car and Chris's "unluckiest" race had to be at
Clermont-Ferrand where if there was any justice in the world he
would've scored an utterly commanding victory. (Actually, he was
sold a pup at March, thinking it'd be a one- or maybe two-car team,
instead of the two full-time works cars, one intermittent works car
for Andretti, one arm's-length privateer car for works F2 driver
Peterson, and a whole pile of customer cars that March ended up
doing.)

For '73 he could've gone back to March when Matra folded, but he
got into haggling over money with Max Mosley. There wasn't much
wrong with the 721G/731; it'd been quick at the end of '72 for the
works and Hunt nearly won races with it for Hesketh (but they had
Harvey Postlethwaite developing their car as he planned the first
Hesketh); but Chris took a strop over money and cooled his heels
until Tecno came along. Now their F2 cars had been quick but crude,
but they'd never done an engine themselves before and the situation
between sponsors Martini and the Pederzani brothers was always
volatile... the fact that the 'team' ran one car and the sponsors
another by a completely differen designer (oh, and there was a third
design out there too, the McCall car... as well as the Pederzani
one and the Fowell one) and there was almost open warfare between
them might hint at some of the problems...

Then of course Chris decided that the way to do it was to be his own
boss -- so he stuck with Gordon Fowell and tried to build a
sophisticated car (aping some of the Lotus 72's features) rather than
going out and buying (say) a Brabham BT42 which would've scored him
decent points finishes (look what Wattie did in the Hexagon car).

From there on in it was all over but the shouting. The guest drives for
BRM.... hm. The Ensign years - well they weren't going to achieve much
running on a shoestring with four-year old Cossies well down on
horsepower, however good Mo Nunn's chassis were (and they weren't bad).

There is no denying that Amon's skills behind the wheel were
absolutely first-rate, but he lacked the *application* that made
true champions. Had Chris been born a decade earlier, starting his
racing career in the early fifties rather than the early sixties,
I am absolutely sure he could've been a multiple World Champion.
As it was, he "grew up" in an era where being quick on track wasn't
enough -- drivers had to be politically shrewd too.

A truly all-round driver can put himself in the right team at the right
time, and can form that team round himself. Fangio did it at Alfa,
Maserati and Mercedes (but never quite managed it at Ferrari); Lauda
did it at Ferrari (and to some extent at Brabham and McLaren);
Schumacher did it twice at Benetton and Ferrari, with largely the
same people); JYS bonded with Ken Tyrrell and did it; Clark and
Chapman bonded and did it; Jack Brabham did it twice, once at Cooper
and once for himself.  Prost, Senna and Hakkinen serially made
McLaren "their team" (with the inevitable Prost/Senna friction as
one ousted the other).  Even the Brabham boys would walk over broken
glass for Piquet in his time there. (Bruce McLaren did it in his own team
but channeled most of the success into Can-Am...)

Chris Amon never managed that; being a really nice guy and being
blindingly quick aren't enough. F1 became a "total" sport during his
career, not just something you did at weekends between selling Mk2 Jags
back to NZ and making extensive use of Gordon's most excellent spiritous
products at wild parties.

By all accounts Chris is a lovely bloke who doesn't regret for a moment
his racing career (in which he achieved a hell of a lot) - he was one of
the all time greats behind the wheel at a time when you needed to be
that bit more, though -- and to some extent I think you make your
own luck by being in the right place at the right time and Chris
managed to manoeuvre himself into a lot of duff deals and out of a
lot of good ones.

pete
--

 
 
 

Ferrari pit crew during Massa's 1st stop

Post by Dave Er » Thu, 16 Mar 2006 05:29:58


Quote:

> It's "accepted wisdom" to say that Chris was terminally unlucky, but I
> think to some extent he made a rod for his own back. He was terminally
> disorganised and never fully in control of his temper; he stuck with

(snip)

Quote:
> By all accounts Chris is a lovely bloke who doesn't regret for a moment
> his racing career (in which he achieved a hell of a lot) - he was one of
> the all time greats behind the wheel at a time when you needed to be
> that bit more, though -- and to some extent I think you make your
> own luck by being in the right place at the right time and Chris
> managed to manoeuvre himself into a lot of duff deals and out of a
> lot of good ones.

A very interesting read.
Thanks
 
 
 

Ferrari pit crew during Massa's 1st stop

Post by Wifton Perc » Thu, 16 Mar 2006 08:36:43

Quote:



> > It's "accepted wisdom" to say that Chris was terminally unlucky, but I
> > think to some extent he made a rod for his own back. He was terminally
> > disorganised and never fully in control of his temper; he stuck with

> (snip)

> > By all accounts Chris is a lovely bloke who doesn't regret for a moment
> > his racing career (in which he achieved a hell of a lot) - he was one of
> > the all time greats behind the wheel at a time when you needed to be
> > that bit more, though -- and to some extent I think you make your
> > own luck by being in the right place at the right time and Chris
> > managed to manoeuvre himself into a lot of duff deals and out of a
> > lot of good ones.

> A very interesting read.
> Thanks

Yes.  Pete and Doc are amazing. This is one reason why I have to get to
LeMans one day soon. I would love to just listen to their stories.  My
guess is Tony has many as well.  They are walking real-time racing
encyclopedias. One of the main reason I stick around.

I think Pete was right on the mark about some drivers managing their
careers well.  The crappy politics that went on between Senna, Mansell
and Prost were one of the many dark spots in F1.  Poor Nige really got
the shaft by Prost and Renault in 1993.  I did not shed any tears when
Alain went belly up in F1.  Nige always seemed to be playing catch up
to the backhanded dealings of Prost and Senna.

Amon was a great driver but you see someone like Schumacher creating
his own luck.  Schumacher was very lucky to hook up with Brawn & Byrne.
 I am no fan of Schumi as a person but he works hard and manages his
career well.  Probably too well by screwing over the #2 driver.

Kimi needs a mentor as I think it is over between him and Ron.  If
Schumi retires, Brawn & Byrne could be what he needs.  I think Rory
Byrne might not want to stick around that long.

This is what Fisi needed.  Fisi is a wonderful guy and talented driver
but Flavio even said he may be too nice. I remember reading something
by a famous UK F1 writer.  He said the same thing about Zanardi. If
anyone thinks Zanardi was not good, the UK writer mentioned how Hunt
was watching some drivers at Silverstone.  Hunt was there to check out
another driver.  He saw a young Alex/Allessandro and said "he should be
in F1 right now."  Hunt was not the kind of guy to throw around driver
compliments easily.

 
 
 

Ferrari pit crew during Massa's 1st stop

Post by Wifton Perc » Thu, 16 Mar 2006 09:13:54

Quote:



> > It's "accepted wisdom" to say that Chris was terminally unlucky, but I
> > think to some extent he made a rod for his own back. He was terminally
> > disorganised and never fully in control of his temper; he stuck with

> (snip)

> > By all accounts Chris is a lovely bloke who doesn't regret for a moment
> > his racing career (in which he achieved a hell of a lot) - he was one of
> > the all time greats behind the wheel at a time when you needed to be
> > that bit more, though -- and to some extent I think you make your
> > own luck by being in the right place at the right time and Chris
> > managed to manoeuvre himself into a lot of duff deals and out of a
> > lot of good ones.

> A very interesting read.
> Thanks

Yes.  Pete and Doc are amazing. This is one reason why I have to get to
LeMans one day soon. I would love to just listen to their stories.  My
guess is Tony has many as well.  They are walking real-time racing
encyclopedias. One of the main reason I stick around.

I think Pete was right on the mark about some drivers managing their
careers well.  The crappy politics that went on between Senna, Mansell
and Prost were one of the many dark spots in F1.  Poor Nige really got
the shaft by Prost and Renault in 1993.  I did not shed any tears when
Alain went belly up in F1.  Nige always seemed to be playing catch up
to the backhanded dealings of Prost and Senna.

Amon was a great driver but you see someone like Schumacher creating
his own luck.  Schumacher was very lucky to hook up with Brawn & Byrne.
 I am no fan of Schumi as a person but he works hard and manages his
career well.  Probably too well by screwing over the #2 driver.

Kimi needs a mentor as I think it is over between him and Ron.  If
Schumi retires, Brawn & Byrne could be what he needs.  I think Rory
Byrne might not want to stick around that long.

This is what Fisi needed.  Fisi is a wonderful guy and talented driver
but Flavio even said he may be too nice. I remember reading something
by a famous UK F1 writer.  He said the same thing about Zanardi. If
anyone thinks Zanardi was not good, the UK writer mentioned how Hunt
was watching some drivers at Silverstone.  Hunt was there to check out
another driver.  He saw a young Alex/Allessandro and said "he should be
in F1 right now."  Hunt was not the kind of guy to throw around driver
compliments easily.

 
 
 

Ferrari pit crew during Massa's 1st stop

Post by Oslo » Fri, 17 Mar 2006 03:31:53


Quote:
> A little bit early for the 'missing tyre' bit?
> Haven't seen that little action from a group of Italians in the desert
> since North Africa in the early 1940's

***