"teamwork or foul play?" RB: "his teammate's poodle."

"teamwork or foul play?" RB: "his teammate's poodle."

Post by vailchale » Wed, 16 May 2001 11:19:24


Distasteful? Yes.

Unsportsmanlike? Possibly.

Illegal? No.

Controversial? Always.

In Ferraris home country, Romes Corriere dello Sport took a surprisingly
negative stance against the team that is considered a national treasure,
saying, "We are among those who were angered to see the most prestigious racing
team in the world resorting to a trick for rounding off the day's balance."
Milans il Giorno concurred, saying, "Was it teamwork or foul play?"

The Daily Telegraph said that Barrichello "had been humbled in front of an
audience of millions," adding that he was "a man revealed to all as his
teammate's poodle." The Daily Mail noted that, "David Coulthard may still trail
Michael Schumacher in the World Championship... but he holds the moral, and
perhaps psychological, high ground after yesterday's Austrian Grand Prix."

Ferrari Team Orders Spark Controversy

Concord, N.C., May 14 ?It wasnt the first time.

It wont be the last time, either.

Ferraris decision to order Rubens Barrichello to cede second place in the
Austrian Grand Prix to his championship-leading teammate Michael Schumacher was
just the most recent example of the fabled Italian Formula 1 team manipulating
its drivers to achieve its goal, which is always the World Championship.

Distasteful? Yes.

Unsportsmanlike? Possibly.

Illegal? No.

Controversial? Always.

Reaction both pro and con has been fast and furious, both from within
and without the paddock area.

First and foremost was from Ferraris arch-rivals at McLaren/Mercedes. Team
boss Ron Dennis told Britains ITV network, "We won't be bringing in team
orders, because we're in the business of winning races. We've always made it
clear that we're very fair with the guys. When it's mathematically impossible,
then we'll step in. It's not right to intercede, unless the circumstances
require it."

Dennis view was seconded by his technical director Adrian Newey, who said
that such tactics go "against the ethics of the sport."

Race winner David Coulthard, who may have seen the drama unfold in his
rear-view mirror as he crossed the finish line, concurred.

"That's Formula 1, that's their team situation," he said. "I think a year ago
it was clarified that a team could run their cars as they felt fit, and I don't
have a problem with clear rules being upheld. What I have a problem with is
these vague rules where you don't quite know where you stand. But in this
situation it's quite clear, and I drive the car and the team run the team, so
whatever happens we just do our job. All I know is I've never benefited from
someone moving over for me, so every point I've earned in Formula 1 has been
through normal racing. I've never even won a race because someone's blown up 10
laps from the end, so I could do with a few of those people dropping out."

Juergen Hubbert, who heads DaimlerChryslers Mercedes-Benz division, was
dismayed at the tactics he said would "castrate" the sport.

"I think it's a shame that someone who has run a fantastic race then doesn't
get what they deserve," Hubbert said. "We see things differently from Ferrari.
If you castrate the sport, one day it's not going to be interesting anymore."

Other teams, such as Williams/BMW also weighed in. Williams technical director
Patrick Head said, "We have one approach to racing, and Ferrari have another.
It is not right or healthy for Rubens, but it is probably in his contract, so
that is Rubens' choice."

Some drivers were also in disagreement with Ferraris policy.

"This seems ridiculous to me," said Williams Juan Pablo Montoya, "especially
at the beginning of the season. It proves that Ferrari is a very bad team for
any other driver to be in while Schumacher is there."

Another series rookie, Minardis Fernando Alonso, said, "It was a strange
decision. It's very early to choose who will fight to be World Champion. Rubens
can also be champion. I wouldn't like to be in his place."

However, not everyone was shocked by the late-race development.

"I don't understand why people are surprised," said 1997 World Champion Jacques
Villeneuve, who drives for BAR/Honda. "Rubens knew before signing with them
that it would be this way. With Michael in the team, everything must go his
way."

Another former World Champion, Niki Lauda, who currently heads Fords Premier
Performance Division that includes Jaguar Racing, shared Villeneuves view.

"Schumacher had more points; what was Rubens expecting?" Lauda said. "With
Coulthard winning, Ferrari wanted to give Schumacher the most number of points,
it's logical."

A similar diversion of views took place today in the European media, whose
passion for the sport reflects their readers. In Ferraris home country,
Romes Corriere dello Sport took a surprisingly negative stance against the
team that is considered a national treasure, saying, "We are among those who
were angered to see the most prestigious racing team in the world resorting to
a trick for rounding off the day's balance." Milans il Giorno concurred,
saying, "Was it teamwork or foul play?"

However, Italys largest sports daily, Gazzetta dello Sport, came down on the
side of the Prancing Horse, opining, "Barrichello's sacrifice was a
bureaucratic move in the interest of the team."

In England, where you might expect the criticism to be somewhat harsh
considering that Ferraris title rival McLaren is British-based, the comments
took a somewhat more strident tone.

The Daily Telegraph said that Barrichello "had been humbled in front of an
audience of millions," adding that he was "a man revealed to all as his
teammate's poodle." The Daily Mail noted that, "David Coulthard may still trail
Michael Schumacher in the World Championship... but he holds the moral, and
perhaps psychological, high ground after yesterday's Austrian Grand Prix."

For their part, Ferrari maintains that team orders is just part of doing
business in the highly competitive business of Formula 1, and that they are
completely within the strictures of the rulebook.

"I think this sport is involved a lot of things," Schumacher said after the
race yesterday, "a lot of money, a lot of pressure, and all that counts in the
end is the championship, to be honest. And as long as we don't work against the
rules, I think we're quite fair to do this and the rules say quite clearly that
there is nothing stopping that. So for sure there will be some people
disagreeing, there will be other people who agree. That's the way of life."

The three-time and reigning World Champion dismissed claims that team orders
were unsporting.

"Imagine at the end of the season I have missed the championship by two
points," he said. "Yes, it is sport to win it like this as well.

"Listen, I think it is a different philosophy Ferrari has on that against
McLaren, and I think you simply have to accept the different philosophies. You
don't have to like it, but that's the way it is."

Ferrari team boss Jean Todt, who made the decision and issued the instruction
to Coulthard, defended his actions in a statement to the ANSA news agency.

"All the teams have used, and will continue to use, team orders," he insisted.
"Where's the scandal?

"Every team have their own way of managing a race. Our decision was based on
the situation, even if it was only the sixth race of the year.

"It is not easy to ask a driver to let the other one pass, but we are a team
and we have to act according to that. We decided that six points could be
crucial for Michael.

"It's obvious that a driver is always hoping to be on the highest step of the
podium, which applies to Rubens as it does to all the other drivers.

"Rubens is part of the team, and he has to do what the team asks him to. He's a
professional driver because he's paid to do a job, to work for a team, the
team's interests.

"Time will tell if we were right or wrong giving those points to Michael."
?John Gardner, News Bureau Editor, RACER(Photo: LAT Photographic)  

http://speedvision.com/pub/articles/racing/01formula1/010514b.html

 
 
 

"teamwork or foul play?" RB: "his teammate's poodle."

Post by Johnn » Wed, 16 May 2001 18:28:32

Well, what do you expect. That's the
media! Need I say more?!:-)

Herbert
A fan of Johnny!:-)

vailchalet2 schrieb:

Quote:
> Distasteful? Yes.

> Unsportsmanlike? Possibly.

> Illegal? No.

> Controversial? Always.

> In Ferraria€?s home country, Romea€?s Corriere dello Sport took a surprisingly
> negative stance against the team that is considered a national treasure,
> saying, "We are among those who were angered to see the most prestigious racing
> team in the world resorting to a trick for rounding off the day's balance."
> Milana€?s il Giorno concurred, saying, "Was it teamwork or foul play?"

> The Daily Telegraph said that Barrichello "had been humbled in front of an
> audience of millions," adding that he was "a man revealed to all as his
> teammate's poodle." The Daily Mail noted that, "David Coulthard may still trail
> Michael Schumacher in the World Championship... but he holds the moral, and
> perhaps psychological, high ground after yesterday's Austrian Grand Prix."

> Ferrari Team Orders Spark Controversy

> Concord, N.C., May 14 a€? It wasna€?t the first time.

> It wona€?t be the last time, either.

> Ferraria€?s decision to order Rubens Barrichello to cede second place in the
> Austrian Grand Prix to his championship-leading teammate Michael Schumacher was
> just the most recent example of the fabled Italian Formula 1 team manipulating
> its drivers to achieve its goal, which is always the World Championship.

> Distasteful? Yes.

> Unsportsmanlike? Possibly.

> Illegal? No.

> Controversial? Always.

> Reaction a€ both pro and con a€ has been fast and furious, both from within
> and without the paddock area.

> First and foremost was from Ferraria€?s arch-rivals at McLaren/Mercedes. Team
> boss Ron Dennis told Britaina€?s ITV network, "We won't be bringing in team
> orders, because we're in the business of winning races. We've always made it
> clear that we're very fair with the guys. When it's mathematically impossible,
> then we'll step in. It's not right to intercede, unless the circumstances
> require it."

> Dennisa€? view was seconded by his technical director Adrian Newey, who said
> that such tactics go "against the ethics of the sport."

> Race winner David Coulthard, who may have seen the drama unfold in his
> rear-view mirror as he crossed the finish line, concurred.

> "That's Formula 1, that's their team situation," he said. "I think a year ago
> it was clarified that a team could run their cars as they felt fit, and I don't
> have a problem with clear rules being upheld. What I have a problem with is
> these vague rules where you don't quite know where you stand. But in this
> situation it's quite clear, and I drive the car and the team run the team, so
> whatever happens we just do our job. All I know is I've never benefited from
> someone moving over for me, so every point I've earned in Formula 1 has been
> through normal racing. I've never even won a race because someone's blown up 10
> laps from the end, so I could do with a few of those people dropping out."

> Juergen Hubbert, who heads DaimlerChryslera€?s Mercedes-Benz division, was
> dismayed at the tactics he said would "castrate" the sport.

> "I think it's a shame that someone who has run a fantastic race then doesn't
> get what they deserve," Hubbert said. "We see things differently from Ferrari.
> If you castrate the sport, one day it's not going to be interesting anymore."

> Other teams, such as Williams/BMW also weighed in. Williams technical director
> Patrick Head said, "We have one approach to racing, and Ferrari have another.
> It is not right or healthy for Rubens, but it is probably in his contract, so
> that is Rubens' choice."

> Some drivers were also in disagreement with Ferraria€?s policy.

> "This seems ridiculous to me," said Williamsa€? Juan Pablo Montoya, "especially
> at the beginning of the season. It proves that Ferrari is a very bad team for
> any other driver to be in while Schumacher is there."

> Another series rookie, Minardia€?s Fernando Alonso, said, "It was a strange
> decision. It's very early to choose who will fight to be World Champion. Rubens
> can also be champion. I wouldn't like to be in his place."

> However, not everyone was shocked by the late-race development.

> "I don't understand why people are surprised," said 1997 World Champion Jacques
> Villeneuve, who drives for BAR/Honda. "Rubens knew before signing with them
> that it would be this way. With Michael in the team, everything must go his
> way."

> Another former World Champion, Niki Lauda, who currently heads Forda€?s Premier
> Performance Division that includes Jaguar Racing, shared Villeneuvea€?s view.

> "Schumacher had more points; what was Rubens expecting?" Lauda said. "With
> Coulthard winning, Ferrari wanted to give Schumacher the most number of points,
> it's logical."

> A similar diversion of views took place today in the European media, whose
> passion for the sport reflects their readersa€?. In Ferraria€?s home country,
> Romea€?s Corriere dello Sport took a surprisingly negative stance against the
> team that is considered a national treasure, saying, "We are among those who
> were angered to see the most prestigious racing team in the world resorting to
> a trick for rounding off the day's balance." Milana€?s il Giorno concurred,
> saying, "Was it teamwork or foul play?"

> However, Italya€?s largest sports daily, Gazzetta dello Sport, came down on the
> side of the Prancing Horse, opining, "Barrichello's sacrifice was a
> bureaucratic move in the interest of the team."

> In England, where you might expect the criticism to be somewhat harsh
> considering that Ferraria€?s title rival McLaren is British-based, the comments
> took a somewhat more strident tone.

> The Daily Telegraph said that Barrichello "had been humbled in front of an
> audience of millions," adding that he was "a man revealed to all as his
> teammate's poodle." The Daily Mail noted that, "David Coulthard may still trail
> Michael Schumacher in the World Championship... but he holds the moral, and
> perhaps psychological, high ground after yesterday's Austrian Grand Prix."

> For their part, Ferrari maintains that team orders is just part of doing
> business in the highly competitive business of Formula 1, and that they are
> completely within the strictures of the rulebook.

> "I think this sport is involved a lot of things," Schumacher said after the
> race yesterday, "a lot of money, a lot of pressure, and all that counts in the
> end is the championship, to be honest. And as long as we don't work against the
> rules, I think we're quite fair to do this and the rules say quite clearly that
> there is nothing stopping that. So for sure there will be some people
> disagreeing, there will be other people who agree. That's the way of life."

> The three-time and reigning World Champion dismissed claims that team orders
> were unsporting.

> "Imagine at the end of the season I have missed the championship by two
> points," he said. "Yes, it is sport to win it like this as well.

> "Listen, I think it is a different philosophy Ferrari has on that against
> McLaren, and I think you simply have to accept the different philosophies. You
> don't have to like it, but that's the way it is."

> Ferrari team boss Jean Todt, who made the decision and issued the instruction
> to Coulthard, defended his actions in a statement to the ANSA news agency.

> "All the teams have used, and will continue to use, team orders," he insisted.
> "Where's the scandal?

> "Every team have their own way of managing a race. Our decision was based on
> the situation, even if it was only the sixth race of the year.

> "It is not easy to ask a driver to let the other one pass, but we are a team
> and we have to act according to that. We decided that six points could be
> crucial for Michael.

> "It's obvious that a driver is always hoping to be on the highest step of the
> podium, which applies to Rubens as it does to all the other drivers.

> "Rubens is part of the team, and he has to do what the team asks him to. He's a
> professional driver because he's paid to do a job, to work for a team, the
> team's interests.

> "Time will tell if we were right or wrong giving those points to Michael."
> a€? John Gardner, News Bureau Editor, RACER(Photo: LAT Photographic)

> http://speedvision.com/pub/articles/racing/01formula1/010514b.html