Why Brazilian drivers are fast?

Why Brazilian drivers are fast?

Post by C. D'ago » Mon, 24 Oct 1994 02:50:38


For the last years I've been watching F1 and IC races. There is always
a Brazilian driver within at least the top 6 championship points, not
to mention world champions (Fittipaldi, Piquet, Senna).  Anyone has any
clue of why Brazilians can be so damn fast?

Once I've heard of a hair raising driving situation Jackie Stewart
experienced, but not in a race track. He was in the back seat of a taxi
cab, in Sao Paulo or Rio de Janeiro (in the early 70's, I suppose). As I
recall, as the cab driver "raced" through traffic like a maniac to
"safely" take J.Stewart from the airport to his Hotel, he figured out why
Fittipaldi could be such a fast driver.

I don't think that this can be a "sufficient" argument to explain Brazilians'
racing style. But what else could there be? Or just the Brazilians are not
that fast after all?

C D'agord

 
 
 

Why Brazilian drivers are fast?

Post by Luiz Antonio De Ro » Mon, 24 Oct 1994 03:37:10

Quote:

>For the last years I've been watching F1 and IC races. There is always
>a Brazilian driver within at least the top 6 championship points, not
>to mention world champions (Fittipaldi, Piquet, Senna).  Anyone has any
>clue of why Brazilians can be so damn fast?
>C D'agord

After you drive for a while in Brazil, you can understand Stewart comments.
He also said that it was probably something in the water :-)

Seriously, I think that one answer for this question is the fact that
racing in Brazil is very popular (the second most popular sport after
soccer). Hence, a lot of people start racing very early, specially in
go-karts. In my opinion, what generate good drivers, is the fact that
because this is a very expensive sport, and a lot of these young drivers
are not very rich, they have to do most (or all) of the setup by themselves,
not relying in mechanics or somebody else. They tend to be their own mechanic,
and they end up learning a lot about that. You can notice that normally
brazilian drivers are known to be very good in setting up the car, specially
chassis. The very good knowledge about the car (specially setup) will always
give some advantage to the driver.

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Why Brazilian drivers are fast?

Post by Ary Correa J » Mon, 24 Oct 1994 05:29:34


Quote:


> >For the last years I've been watching F1 and IC races. There is always
> >a Brazilian driver within at least the top 6 championship points, not
> >to mention world champions (Fittipaldi, Piquet, Senna).  Anyone has any
> >clue of why Brazilians can be so damn fast?

> >C D'agord

> After you drive for a while in Brazil, you can understand Stewart comments.
> He also said that it was probably something in the water :-)

> Seriously, I think that one answer for this question is the fact that
> racing in Brazil is very popular (the second most popular sport after
> soccer). Hence, a lot of people start racing very early, specially in
> go-karts. In my opinion, what generate good drivers, is the fact that
> because this is a very expensive sport, and a lot of these young drivers
> are not very rich, they have to do most (or all) of the setup by themselves,
> not relying in mechanics or somebody else. They tend to be their own mechanic,
> and they end up learning a lot about that. You can notice that normally
> brazilian drivers are known to be very good in setting up the car, specially
> chassis. The very good knowledge about the car (specially setup) will always
> give some advantage to the driver.

Actually only Emerson's would not be considered a rich family in Brazil
(when he started of course).  Emerson's father was a speaker in a very
popular radio station in Sao Paulo.  Emerson began racing on streets with
his on father's car and from there racing profisionally for Willys Company.

Piquet's family was a proeminent family of politicians.  They have a lot of
money but his father would not give him a peny for racing.  He started
working in a garage mainly for steal car's during the weekends for go
racing.  There is a very nice story about him being one of Carlos Reutmans
mechanics (actually the guy responsible from cleaning the car) in one race
in Jacarepagua.  After that he decided to be a F1 race driver.  Do you
remember who was the second in the championship when Piquet won his first
one ?

Senna's family was the richest of them all.  His father own a furniture
industry.  I remember seen him going race in a go kart in Interlagos.  He
always have the best equipment and made all the other kids envy.  I could
never like the guy, but he was one the best drivers a I ever saw.

I do not know what make Brazilians fast, maybe is the traffic, the water,
the wheather, I do not know, but they are good.

Barichello, is there for prove me right.

Good by, I am getting home sick.

 
 
 

Why Brazilian drivers are fast?

Post by Brendan McFarla » Tue, 25 Oct 1994 19:09:00

Success in F1 demands that the following criteria are met, almost without  
exception.

1. Ability, naturally.
2. Success in the lower formulae _in Europe._
3. Support (sponsorship, media coverage etc...) from your own country,      
   even though you are racing in Europe.

Rubens, Emmo, Nelson and Ayrton all met these critera. The reason no US  
drivers, for example, have enjoyed the same success is that they do not  
get the support from home when they race in Europe. Mario was an  
exception, but he was lucky to land the seat at Lotus at the time when  
they needed someone who had the sensitivity to pitch changes needed to set-
up ground-effects cars.

Several countries have attempted to redress this through "Driver to  
Europe" schemes, but most have failed.

There have nevertheless been cases of drivers who have overcome apathy at  
home by racing in England, witness this interesting quote from Alan Jones  
in "Driving Ambition":

"To their everalsting credit, the British are prepared to help anyone who  
deserves it, regardless of nationality, and I don't owe any part of my  
racing career to Australians. They didn't back me when I started and they  
only paid attention to me when I won the Championship. You wouldn't find a  
French team or sponsor doing for a young foreign driver what those two  
(George Robinson and Harry Stiller) did for me; and if the Italians did  
anything it would be strictly out of self-interest."

The contribution which the British racing scene has made to some of our  
most celebrated champions should not be underestimated.

----------------------------------------------------------------
Brendan McFarlane
59075 Hamm, Germany - Home of the World's Largest Glass Elephant

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Why Brazilian drivers are fast?

Post by David Shephe » Tue, 25 Oct 1994 23:05:56

Quote:

>For the last years I've been watching F1 and IC races. There is always
>a Brazilian driver within at least the top 6 championship points, not
>to mention world champions (Fittipaldi, Piquet, Senna).  Anyone has any
>clue of why Brazilians can be so damn fast?

Take a trip on a bus in somewhere like Rio and you'll see where
they get there training from! Weaving between traffic at speed
is a must + they seem to treat stopping and moving off from
bus stops in the same way as coming in to the pits to change
tyres (come in at speed, break heavily to halt, swap passengers,
accelerate away!)

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Why Brazilian drivers are fast?

Post by Daryl Mor » Wed, 26 Oct 1994 08:17:40

Quote:

> Success in F1 demands that the following criteria are met, almost
> without exception.
> 1. Ability, naturally.
> 2. Success in the lower formulae _in Europe._
> 3. Support (sponsorship, media coverage etc...) from your
>    own country, even though you are racing in Europe.

I'd say that Gilles Villeneuve was an exception to your rule. He met
1, didn't meet 2, and only partically met 3.

As for 1, I don't think anyone will doubt that he had ability.

As for 2, the majority of his experience in lower formulae was
acquired in Formula Ford in Quebec, and Formula Atlantic in Canada and
the US. (With some races in South Africa.) I think he drove in one
European F2 and DNFed.

As for 3, he had sponsorship in Canada, but very little media
coverage.  The races are now consistently covered via CBC (BBC) and
TSN (ESPN). However, notwithstanding the Canadian GP, Canadian
coverage of F1 in Villenueve's day was rather sporadic if memory
serves correctly.
--
Daryl Morse                     | Voice  : (604) 293-5476
MPR Teltech Ltd.                | Fax    : (604) 293-5787


 
 
 

Why Brazilian drivers are fast?

Post by F.V. Brasileir » Thu, 27 Oct 1994 06:36:17


[interesting discussion on why Brazilian drivers are fast deleted]

|> Later the list goes on, Fittipaldis, Ribiero, Piquet, Serra, Boesel,
|> Moreno, Senna.......one driver receives more pressure from the
|> previous ones.

Don't forget the late Carlos Pace!

Cheers,
Fubica
===============================================================================
 Francisco Vilar Brasileiro             Phone: +44 91 222 8135
 University of Newcastle upon Tyne      Fax: +44 91 222 8232


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Why Brazilian drivers are fast?

Post by Brendan McFarla » Wed, 26 Oct 1994 21:19:00



Quote:
> I'd say that Gilles Villeneuve was an exception to your rule. He met
> 1, didn't meet 2, and only partically met 3.

> As for 1, I don't think anyone will doubt that he had ability.

> As for 2, the majority of his experience in lower formulae was
> acquired in Formula Ford in Quebec, and Formula Atlantic in Canada and
> the US. (With some races in South Africa.) I think he drove in one
> European F2 and DNFed.

> As for 3, he had sponsorship in Canada, but very little media
> coverage.  The races are now consistently covered via CBC (BBC) and
> TSN (ESPN). However, notwithstanding the Canadian GP, Canadian
> coverage of F1 in Villenueve's day was rather sporadic if memory
> serves correctly.

Valid comments Daryl. However, Gilles was signed by Enzo because Ferrari  
needed a North-American driver to help them in marketing their road cars  
over there. That he turned out to be one hell of a driver came as  
something of a pleasant surpise to most in F1... :-)

Every Champion since Mario (Jones excepted), and many before, have met  
these criteria.

----------------------------------------------------------------
Brendan McFarlane
59075 Hamm, Germany - Home of the World's Largest Glass Elephant

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Why Brazilian drivers are fast?

Post by Daryl Mor » Fri, 28 Oct 1994 15:35:00

Quote:


>> As for 3, he had sponsorship in Canada, but very little media
>> coverage.  The races are now consistently covered via CBC (BBC) and
>> TSN (ESPN). However, notwithstanding the Canadian GP, Canadian
>> coverage of F1 in Villenueve's day was rather sporadic if memory
>> serves correctly.
> Valid comments Daryl. However, Gilles was signed by Enzo because
> Ferrari needed a North-American driver to help them in marketing
> their road cars over there. That he turned out to be one hell of a
> driver came as something of a pleasant surpise to most in F1... :-)

Glad you said North-American. ;-) Anyway, I'd be curious as to how you
arrived at that conclusion. Did Enzo ever actually say that? The
reason that I ask, is because the market draw of a Canadian in USA is
virtually nil, unless the Americans actually think the person is
American. And I'm not being entirely tongue-in-cheek, if even at
all. The very few Canadians that make it big in USA are pretty
consistently indistinguishable from Americans. Clearly Gilles
Villeneuve, as a Quebecois, would not fool anyone in that regard. I
suspect that most Americans would have simply assumed he was
French. Heck, he wasn't even that well known in Canada. Villeneuve was
far better known outside Canada than inside. It comes down to the fact
that F1 just wasn't/isn't that big of a deal here. Canadians and
Americans are much more interested in hockey and baseball strikes (as
in no hockey and baseball) than other such sports such as F1.

I guess you could summarize my uninformed view as that if you are
indeed correct about Enzo's motivation, than Enzo wasn't very
smart. As such, I think you are wrong, or at least are oversimplifying
things.  Enzo needed a driver, "probably" wanted one that would help
sell cars, and he thought Villeneuve was a good gamble. I'm sure that
Villeneuve's driving style contributed 99% of his marketability -
period. His nationality had virtually nothing to do with it. It may
have even been a liability.
--
Daryl Morse                     | Voice  : (604) 293-5476
MPR Teltech Ltd.                | Fax    : (604) 293-5787


 
 
 

Why Brazilian drivers are fast?

Post by Brendan McFarla » Sat, 29 Oct 1994 15:11:00



Quote:
> Glad you said North-American. ;-) Anyway, I'd be curious as to how you
> arrived at that conclusion. Did Enzo ever actually say that? The
> reason that I ask, is because the market draw of a Canadian in USA is
> virtually nil, unless the Americans actually think the person is

[ some stuff deleted ]

Extract from "Driving Ambition" by Alan Jones, on why he did not get the  
drive with Ferrari in 1977, even though they already had an option on him:

"...The problem turned out to be a purely political Ferrari issue: they  
wanted to boost their sales in the United States and Canada and wanted a  
North American driver. In fact they got Gilles Villenueve: I got a  
telegram through the door saying they were sorry they wouldn't be able to  
take up my option."

----------------------------------------------------------------
Brendan McFarlane
59075 Hamm, Germany - Home of the World's Largest Glass Elephant

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