OT - UK Usenet - the downward path

OT - UK Usenet - the downward path

Post by Noj » Sat, 06 Apr 2013 19:51:18


http://www.greenend.org.uk/rjk/spoolstats/

 
 
 

OT - UK Usenet - the downward path

Post by Sir Ti » Sat, 06 Apr 2013 20:55:50


Quote:

> http://www.greenend.org.uk/rjk/spoolstats/

Confirms what we all know I guess: usenet has passed its sell-by date.

Upside is that rasf1 is now reduced to a manageable number of (mainly)
intelligent posters.

--
Henry Birkin, Bt.

 
 
 

OT - UK Usenet - the downward path

Post by Paul Giveri » Sat, 06 Apr 2013 21:01:21



Quote:

>http://www.greenend.org.uk/rjk/spoolstats/

I think most long term Usenet posters have known that for a long while.

I am pleasantly surprised though at the relative strength of the uk*
groups in comparison to some of the bigger worldwide hierarchies like
rec* soc* and comp*.

I still prefer Usenet to a lot of web forums because of the lack of
power crazed (did someone say Nazi?) moderators who like to show you
who's boss. Of course the downside is the trolls but you can always
ignore them.

--
Paul Giverin

My Photos:- www.giverin.co.uk

 
 
 

OT - UK Usenet - the downward path

Post by Noj » Sat, 06 Apr 2013 21:55:47

Paul Giverin wrote ...

Quote:



> >http://SportToday.org/

> I think most long term Usenet posters have known that for a long while.

> I am pleasantly surprised though at the relative strength of the uk*
> groups in comparison to some of the bigger worldwide hierarchies like
> rec* soc* and comp*.

Most of them have been ***ed by the merkin, nym switching, sock puppet
full-time loonies.

Quote:

> I still prefer Usenet to a lot of web forums because of the lack of
> power crazed (did someone say Nazi?) moderators who like to show you
> who's boss. Of course the downside is the trolls but you can always
> ignore them.

I've lost count of the forums I've left because they've been censored to
death by their mods.
 
 
 

OT - UK Usenet - the downward path

Post by Sir Ti » Sat, 06 Apr 2013 22:09:51

Quote:

> I've lost count of the forums I've left because they've been censored to
> death by their mods.

There used to be rasf1-moderated. Never attracted much traffic though.
 
 
 

OT - UK Usenet - the downward path

Post by Alessandro D. Petacci » Sun, 07 Apr 2013 07:03:16

Quote:

>http://SportToday.org/

Huh. And that's just from 2010 - when decline had already been evident
for a while. Still, those seven-days figures are... Somewhat hard to
believe for a dinosaur such as myself: 3k posts (and 3k posters, which
in itself is telling) for the entire rec. hierarchy? I'm rather sure
that, a few years ago, RASF1 alone would have come very close to that.

Oh well. I too dislike web forums,  but what's the alternative?
Facebook groups? They're not bad actually, but - you can't ***y
quote there!

ADP.

 
 
 

OT - UK Usenet - the downward path

Post by texasgat » Sun, 07 Apr 2013 13:29:42


Quote:
> I've lost count of the forums I've left

There in an invention called a pencil and paper.
 
 
 

OT - UK Usenet - the downward path

Post by 2112 » Sun, 07 Apr 2013 13:48:33


Quote:

>> I've lost count of the forums I've left

> There in an invention called a pencil and paper.

Is there one to re-spark the interest in auto racing?
 
 
 

OT - UK Usenet - the downward path

Post by Noj » Sun, 07 Apr 2013 18:47:40

texasgate wrote ...

Quote:


> > I've lost count of the forums I've left

> There in an invention called a pencil and paper.

You still measuring men's***s ?
 
 
 

OT - UK Usenet - the downward path

Post by Sir Ti » Sun, 07 Apr 2013 20:20:39


Quote:


>> http://www.greenend.org.uk/rjk/spoolstats/

> I think most long term Usenet posters have known that for a long while.

> I am pleasantly surprised though at the relative strength of the uk*
> groups in comparison to some of the bigger worldwide hierarchies like
> rec* soc* and comp*.

> I still prefer Usenet to a lot of web forums because of the lack of
> power crazed (did someone say Nazi?) moderators who like to show you
> who's boss. Of course the downside is the trolls but you can always
> ignore them.

As I've said before, there was a time when a troll was a thing of
beauty; carefully constructed to extract a silly or pompous response
from the unwary newbie. Nowadays the term seems only to be used to
describe grossly provocative posts or straightforward abuse.

I've often wondered what the motivation of those who post such rubbish
is. Their lives must be *very* unfulfilled if they feel the need to
spray vitriol around but then I suppose that even highly intelligent
individuals often have very frail egos.

I don't wish to ride too high a horse as I have certainly been guilty of
expressing my opinions on Usenet more robustly than I might do if
eyeball to eyeball with my target but I do try to adhere to the policy
of not posting something that I would not say face to face (ITRW I'm
something of a contrarian but, I hope, a polite one).

Despite these rather worthy opinions I still loath moderated groups. To
quote Churchill: "I might not like what they say but I would defend with
my life their right to say it" (even texasgate).

--
Henry Birkin, Bt.

 
 
 

OT - UK Usenet - the downward path

Post by News » Sun, 07 Apr 2013 20:35:32


Quote:



>>> http://www.greenend.org.uk/rjk/spoolstats/

>> I think most long term Usenet posters have known that for a long while.

>> I am pleasantly surprised though at the relative strength of the uk*
>> groups in comparison to some of the bigger worldwide hierarchies like
>> rec* soc* and comp*.

>> I still prefer Usenet to a lot of web forums because of the lack of
>> power crazed (did someone say Nazi?) moderators who like to show you
>> who's boss. Of course the downside is the trolls but you can always
>> ignore them.

> As I've said before, there was a time when a troll was a thing of
> beauty; carefully constructed to extract a silly or pompous response
> from the unwary newbie. Nowadays the term seems only to be used to
> describe grossly provocative posts or straightforward abuse.

> I've often wondered what the motivation of those who post such rubbish
> is. Their lives must be *very* unfulfilled if they feel the need to
> spray vitriol around but then I suppose that even highly intelligent
> individuals often have very frail egos.

> I don't wish to ride too high a horse as I have certainly been guilty of
> expressing my opinions on Usenet more robustly than I might do if
> eyeball to eyeball with my target but I do try to adhere to the policy
> of not posting something that I would not say face to face (ITRW I'm
> something of a contrarian but, I hope, a polite one).

> Despite these rather worthy opinions I still loath moderated groups. To
> quote Churchill: "I might not like what they say but I would defend with
> my life their right to say it" (even texasgate).

That's a stretch.