World champions but not world class champions....

World champions but not world class champions....

Post by eska » Thu, 10 Jan 2008 14:49:23


World champions but not world class champions....

That is Ponting's team.  There is no doubt that Ponting's men are
talented cricketers who have been selected through a systematic and
groomed process.  They have enormous work ethic, team discipline and
so on.  Their long streak of wins did not all come from umpire***
ups.

Ponting and co., have also shown how graceless they can be both in the
pursuit of and in winning.  They talk a good talk on fairness but do
not walk it, especially when the chips are down as they were at SCG
evidenced by blatant false appeals, grounded catches that were claimed
etc.  Granted that, every team has its moments of less-than-lily-
whiteness - but none like the Aussies, who are routine offenders but
continue to profess their "spiritedness", "integrity" and the like.
There is also rampant hypocrisy in their use of sledging - above all
teams, they have legitimized it as a tactic.  However they think that
they can deem when and where that should stop.  Apparently "hurt" can
be experienced by only one of them and not by others when they
undercut their opposition incessantly, the intensity of which is
ratcheted up on those rare occasions when the opponent gets an upper
hand in the game.

More insidious than the Australian team's behavior, is the authorities
blatant double standards and the indulgence of the same.  Examples:
(1) When Latif floors a catch and claims it, he is banned.  When
Clarke and Ponting do the same at critical points in a flashpoint
match, the same referee does not even raise an eyebrow.
(2) When Yuvraj dissents on a wrong decision of being given out, he
would be hauled up and investigated (although eventually cleared),
when Ponting does the same, nary a peep from the same referee.
(3) Lacking hard evidence (audio, video) of an opponent's alleged
racist muttering, it would be decided the Australian version at the
deposition is correct notwithstanding the fact that it is the
identical set that claimed and won floored catches, catches from pads
etc., earlier in the day - some how the Austaralians' integrity would
be deemed unimpeachable, even though they had just exhibited that they
had long since vacated the m***high ground that they have claimed to
be theirs.

It is said that BCCI held ICC to ransom on Steve Bucknor and Harbhajan
using its economic muscle.  I say if that is the case, so be it.  It
seems like nothing else gets through to ICC, as teams with clout
lesser than that of India would attest (Pakistan, Sri Lanka and even
England).  I personally think BCCI did not pick all the right
battles.  They should have focused on Ponting and Clarke's (for the
lack of better word), cheating and more importantly, Mr. Procter's
glossing over of the same.  After all at SCG, if it is the umpires who
denied India the glory of a historical win, the Aussies' on-field
shenanigans denied India the dignity of a draw. But if in some manner
the Aussie infallibility and monopoly on dictating terms breaks, that
is to be welcome.

I invite Aussies to show their champion stuff and not their other
side. They would still continue to win greatly, perhaps a trifle less
than what they have through their tactics to date, but would have
earned them all and with that, the respect of one and all.  After all,
that is the ultimate measure of true champions!

 
 
 

World champions but not world class champions....

Post by bongopon.. » Thu, 10 Jan 2008 14:58:49

Quote:
> World champions but not world class champions....

> That is Ponting's team.  There is no doubt that Ponting's men are
> talented cricketers who have been selected through a systematic and
> groomed process.  They have enormous work ethic, team discipline and
> so on.  Their long streak of wins did not all come from umpire***
> ups.

Agree.

Quote:

> Ponting and co., have also shown how graceless they can be both in the
> pursuit of and in winning.  They talk a good talk on fairness but do
> not walk it, especially when the chips are down as they were at SCG
> evidenced by blatant false appeals, grounded catches that were claimed
> etc.  Granted that, every team has its moments of less-than-lily-
> whiteness - but none like the Aussies,

<snip>

I think the pressure of the must-win 16th in a row must have go to
them. Also Gilly and Ponting shouting 'what do you think of that
declaration now, Tony' (paraphrased) at the end kind of indicates they
were under pressure from the criticism of having declared late.
Majority in the Channel 9 box kept on about how Ponting did not give
himself enough time to bowl India out (which was almost true).

 
 
 

World champions but not world class champions....

Post by Madha » Thu, 10 Jan 2008 17:58:10


Quote:

>> World champions but not world class champions....

>> That is Ponting's team.  There is no doubt that Ponting's men are
>> talented cricketers who have been selected through a systematic and
>> groomed process.  They have enormous work ethic, team discipline and
>> so on.  Their long streak of wins did not all come from umpire***
>> ups.

> Agree.

>> Ponting and co., have also shown how graceless they can be both in the
>> pursuit of and in winning.  They talk a good talk on fairness but do
>> not walk it, especially when the chips are down as they were at SCG
>> evidenced by blatant false appeals, grounded catches that were claimed
>> etc.  Granted that, every team has its moments of less-than-lily-
>> whiteness - but none like the Aussies,
> <snip>

> I think the pressure of the must-win 16th in a row must have go to
> them. Also Gilly and Ponting shouting 'what do you think of that
> declaration now, Tony' (paraphrased) at the end kind of indicates they
> were under pressure from the criticism of having declared late.
> Majority in the Channel 9 box kept on about how Ponting did not give
> himself enough time to bowl India out (which was almost true).

Ponting is a ***wit and a cheat. The match ended in
the last over. Aus won doesnt mean he was right
in his declaration timing.

Austrlians have been cheating for years - cricket columnist Michael Epis

http://SportToday.org/

Why Ponting's heroes just don't appeal to me
Michael Epis
January 9, 2008

THE FINAL WORD

I DON'T like cheats. And I don't like this Australian cricket team.

When Andrew Symonds bowled a straight one on the last day of the SCG Test to
Rahul Dravid, who padded up, deflecting the ball into the gloves of Adam
Gilchrist, did any of the Australians really think it was out? I doubt it.
No one watching on TV thought it was out. It wasn't out. Ricky Ponting and
his cohorts knew it. Dravid's bat was behind his pad. To appeal when you
know the batsman is not out is, to my mind, cheating.

It's the Australian way. Has been for years. Gilchrist's predecessor, Ian
Healy, enunciated the rationale perfectly while commentating - he appealed
when he thought the batsman was out, or when he thought the umpire might
give it out. That is, he would appeal if knew it was not out but thought the
umpire might give it out. As I said, cheating.

The heroes of this Australian team say that in cricket you cop the good with
the bad. That's exactly what captain Ponting conspicuously failed to do in
this Test. In the first innings he was given not out when clearly out. Quite
some runs later he was given out when he was not out. Did he cop it? No, he
stood and glared at the umpire. He should have been fined for dissent. He
should have acknowledged it was an easy mistake to make, given the bat was
next to the pad, making the deflection all but imperceptible. And it wasn't
just the heat of the moment: the tantrum continued at the dressing-room. He
should have been ashamed of himself. Back to the Bourbon and Beefsteak,
mate.

But Ponting is not ashamed. "I really can't see how we have done anything
wrong by the spirit of the game," he said when the furore blew up. I can. So
can a lot of others.

The Australians have just equalled the game's longest winning streak. Next
week in Perth they should better it. Then go one better again in Adelaide.
Who knows where it might end. Well, they can stick their streak where they
can stick their 3 mobile. After this effort, I couldn't care less.

Which is a pity. There was much to like in this contest. Brad Hogg an
unlikely saviour in the first-innings revival. The Indian response was
better still: Dravid's doggedness, Laxman's elegance, Tendulkar's mastery.
Even Ponting's properness in declining to appeal for a line-ball low-down
take. But the match was marred and entered the halls of infamy by the
poorest of umpiring, Australian petulance - and Harbhajan's Singh's
wrongdoing. If, that is, you accept the Australians' version of events and
not his.

But when the Australians stand at the crease when they edge the ball to
first slip and appeal when the batsmen is clearly not out - well, why then
would you believe anything they say?

The lack of good grace marked the Australians throughout this match. And
series - what a cheek of Matthew Hayden to say that Anil Kumble "stole" five
wickets in Melbourne. You could say Hayden has stolen 29 Test centuries,
having barely faced one decent fast bowler in all that time. The lack of
grace was there when Ponting motioned to the commentary box after the game,
from where Tony Greig had dared to criticise the timing of his declaration.
And it was there at the post-match media conference when he blasted an
Indian reporter for daring to question him.

Ricky, time to have some KFC and calm down. Me, I think I need a bucket.

You know what I mean.

 
 
 

World champions but not world class champions....

Post by coop » Thu, 10 Jan 2008 18:20:25

Quote:



>>> World champions but not world class champions....

>>> That is Ponting's team.  There is no doubt that Ponting's men are
>>> talented cricketers who have been selected through a systematic and
>>> groomed process.  They have enormous work ethic, team discipline and
>>> so on.  Their long streak of wins did not all come from umpire***
>>> ups.

>> Agree.

>>> Ponting and co., have also shown how graceless they can be both in the
>>> pursuit of and in winning.  They talk a good talk on fairness but do
>>> not walk it, especially when the chips are down as they were at SCG
>>> evidenced by blatant false appeals, grounded catches that were claimed
>>> etc.  Granted that, every team has its moments of less-than-lily-
>>> whiteness - but none like the Aussies,
>> <snip>

>> I think the pressure of the must-win 16th in a row must have go to
>> them. Also Gilly and Ponting shouting 'what do you think of that
>> declaration now, Tony' (paraphrased) at the end kind of indicates they
>> were under pressure from the criticism of having declared late.
>> Majority in the Channel 9 box kept on about how Ponting did not give
>> himself enough time to bowl India out (which was almost true).

> Ponting is a ***wit and a cheat. The match ended in
> the last over. Aus won doesnt mean he was right
> in his declaration timing.

Ummm means he is a pretty good judge and a FANTASTIC captain.

- Show quoted text -

Quote:

> Austrlians have been cheating for years - cricket columnist Michael Epis

> http://SportToday.org/

> Why Ponting's heroes just don't appeal to me
> Michael Epis
> January 9, 2008

> THE FINAL WORD

> I DON'T like cheats. And I don't like this Australian cricket team.

> When Andrew Symonds bowled a straight one on the last day of the SCG Test
> to
> Rahul Dravid, who padded up, deflecting the ball into the gloves of Adam
> Gilchrist, did any of the Australians really think it was out? I doubt it.
> No one watching on TV thought it was out. It wasn't out. Ricky Ponting and
> his cohorts knew it. Dravid's bat was behind his pad. To appeal when you
> know the batsman is not out is, to my mind, cheating.

> It's the Australian way. Has been for years. Gilchrist's predecessor, Ian
> Healy, enunciated the rationale perfectly while commentating - he appealed
> when he thought the batsman was out, or when he thought the umpire might
> give it out. That is, he would appeal if knew it was not out but thought
> the
> umpire might give it out. As I said, cheating.

> The heroes of this Australian team say that in cricket you cop the good
> with
> the bad. That's exactly what captain Ponting conspicuously failed to do in
> this Test. In the first innings he was given not out when clearly out.
> Quite
> some runs later he was given out when he was not out. Did he cop it? No,
> he
> stood and glared at the umpire. He should have been fined for dissent. He
> should have acknowledged it was an easy mistake to make, given the bat was
> next to the pad, making the deflection all but imperceptible. And it
> wasn't
> just the heat of the moment: the tantrum continued at the dressing-room.
> He
> should have been ashamed of himself. Back to the Bourbon and Beefsteak,
> mate.

> But Ponting is not ashamed. "I really can't see how we have done anything
> wrong by the spirit of the game," he said when the furore blew up. I can.
> So
> can a lot of others.

> The Australians have just equalled the game's longest winning streak. Next
> week in Perth they should better it. Then go one better again in Adelaide.
> Who knows where it might end. Well, they can stick their streak where they
> can stick their 3 mobile. After this effort, I couldn't care less.

> Which is a pity. There was much to like in this contest. Brad Hogg an
> unlikely saviour in the first-innings revival. The Indian response was
> better still: Dravid's doggedness, Laxman's elegance, Tendulkar's mastery.
> Even Ponting's properness in declining to appeal for a line-ball low-down
> take. But the match was marred and entered the halls of infamy by the
> poorest of umpiring, Australian petulance - and Harbhajan's Singh's
> wrongdoing. If, that is, you accept the Australians' version of events and
> not his.

> But when the Australians stand at the crease when they edge the ball to
> first slip and appeal when the batsmen is clearly not out - well, why then
> would you believe anything they say?

> The lack of good grace marked the Australians throughout this match. And
> series - what a cheek of Matthew Hayden to say that Anil Kumble "stole"
> five
> wickets in Melbourne. You could say Hayden has stolen 29 Test centuries,
> having barely faced one decent fast bowler in all that time. The lack of
> grace was there when Ponting motioned to the commentary box after the
> game,
> from where Tony Greig had dared to criticise the timing of his
> declaration.
> And it was there at the post-match media conference when he blasted an
> Indian reporter for daring to question him.

> Ricky, time to have some KFC and calm down. Me, I think I need a bucket.

> You know what I mean.

 
 
 

World champions but not world class champions....

Post by eska » Fri, 11 Jan 2008 01:16:53



Quote:
> > World champions but not world class champions....

> > That is Ponting's team. ?There is no doubt that Ponting's men are
> > talented cricketers who have been selected through a systematic and
> > groomed process. ?They have enormous work ethic, team discipline and
> > so on. ?Their long streak of wins did not all come from umpire***
> > ups.

> Agree.

> > Ponting and co., have also shown how graceless they can be both in the
> > pursuit of and in winning. ?They talk a good talk on fairness but do
> > not walk it, especially when the chips are down as they were at SCG
> > evidenced by blatant false appeals, grounded catches that were claimed
> > etc. ?Granted that, every team has its moments of less-than-lily-
> > whiteness - but none like the Aussies,

> <snip>

> I think the pressure of the must-win 16th in a row must have go to
> them. Also Gilly and Ponting shouting 'what do you think of that
> declaration now, Tony' (paraphrased) at the end kind of indicates they
> were under pressure from the criticism of having declared late.
> Majority in the Channel 9 box kept on about how Ponting did not give
> himself enough time to bowl India out (which was almost true).

I agree with bongo the captain and his vice got nervous about the
timing of their declaration.  And so as it goes everything is fair to
stave of that potential blot  (including floored catches, acting
contrary to the agreement made with Kumble, pad catches by Mr. Adam
Fairness Gilchrist...) - proves my point; world champions but lacking
the class to act as one.