Australian batting line-up

Australian batting line-up

Post by Vivek Kha » Wed, 09 Nov 1994 10:05:53


The current Australian team boasts of a plethora of batting talent.
When was the last time that Aus was in such an enviable position? I
can't think of any such time in the past 15 years of so.

Also, when did other countries have such "golden eras" in batting?

Vivek

*******************************************************************

 
 
 

Australian batting line-up

Post by John Ha » Fri, 11 Nov 1994 06:12:37



Quote:
> The current Australian team boasts of a plethora of batting talent.
> When was the last time that Aus was in such an enviable position? I
> can't think of any such time in the past 15 years of so.

> Also, when did other countries have such "golden eras" in batting?

> Vivek

> *******************************************************************

Well, for England I recall the tour of WI in 1967-8 when the line-up
began:

1. Boycott
2. J.Edrich
3. Cowdrey
4. Graveney
5. Barrington
6. D'Oliveira
7. Knott

All the top 4 reached 100 first-class hundreds, Barrington averaged 58
in Tests, and D'Oliveira and Knott were more than useful.
--


                                      | If I have erred in the above posting,
  Cranleigh, Surrey, England          | please be charitable.

 
 
 

Australian batting line-up

Post by Jeff Charl » Sun, 13 Nov 1994 06:24:32

Quote:



> > The current Australian team boasts of a plethora of batting talent.
> > When was the last time that Aus was in such an enviable position? I
> > can't think of any such time in the past 15 years of so.

> > Also, when did other countries have such "golden eras" in batting?

> > Vivek

> > *******************************************************************

I think the West Indies line up in the fifties of

1.Rae
2 Stollmeyer
3.Worrell
4 Weeks
5 Walcott
6.Gomes
7.Goddard  

was dynamite.The 3 W's were the most fearsome batting combo for years,
with several doublecenturies in tests each.

 
 
 

Australian batting line-up

Post by Balakrishnan G Na » Sun, 13 Nov 1994 07:16:40


|>


|> >
|> > > The current Australian team boasts of a plethora of batting talent.
|> > > When was the last time that Aus was in such an enviable position? I
|> > > can't think of any such time in the past 15 years of so.
|> > >
|> > > Also, when did other countries have such "golden eras" in batting?
|> > >
|> > > Vivek

Actually though if you consider the top 6 batsmen, the present Aussie side might
 have a slight edge, the Aussie middle order of the 70s and early eigthies was a
 lot better than the present one. Greg Chappel, Ian Chappel and Doug Walters in
 the seventies and Greg Chappel, Kim Hughes, Allan Border and Doug Walters in
 the eighties. They desperately suffered from lack of good openers with several
 people trying their luck and dissappearing into anonymity. I can remember
 Rick McCosker, Julien Weiner, Warwick Darling, Greame Wood, John Dyson, Andrew
 Hilditch, Kepler Wessels, Wayne Phillips etc trying out with varying degrees of
 success, but not too much before they found some partial stability in Boon and
 Marsh. Then Mark Taylor came along and they didnt have to look any further.

The Indian, Pakistani and West Indian batting line ups of the times were great
 enough. India boasted Gavaskar, Chauhan, Vengsarkar, Vishwanath, Amarnath,
 Yashpal/Patil and Pakistan had Muddasar, Mohsin Khan, Javed Miandad, Zaheer
 Abbas, Asif Iqbal and Majid Khan. Wasim Raja was no slouch either and earlier
 on, Mustaq Mohammad used to open the batting. Another name which comes to mind
 is the mercurial Haroon Rashid, the original Saeed Anwar. But the West Indies
 batting line up was probably the best with Greenidge, Haynes, Richards, Baccus/
 Rowe, Gomes, and Lloyd, though they were over-shadowed by the fearsome foursome
 at times.

Then there is the Aussie batting line up of the bodyline series, which a lot
 of people consider the strongest ever, though I think the line-up in the 48'
 series(Bradman's last) was even stronger.

-Balky
(The Debo-Nair)

 
 
 

Australian batting line-up

Post by Hamish La » Thu, 17 Nov 1994 11:50:31


Quote:

> |> > >
> |> > > Also, when did other countries have such "golden eras" in batting?

The entire Bradman era 28 - 48 mostly had very strong batting on both sides
(England and Astralia that is).

Quote:
> |> > >
> |> > > Vivek

> Actually though if you consider the top 6 batsmen, the present Aussie side might
>  have a slight edge, the Aussie middle order of the 70s and early eigthies was a
>  lot better than the present one. Greg Chappel, Ian Chappel and Doug Walters in
>  the seventies and Greg Chappel, Kim Hughes, Allan Border and Doug Walters in

I think you'll find Dougie faded out and didn't play again after not being
picked for england in 81.

Quote:
>  the eighties. They desperately suffered from lack of good openers with several
>  people trying their luck and dissappearing into anonymity. I can remember
>  Rick McCosker, Julien Weiner, Warwick Darling, Greame Wood, John Dyson, Andrew
>  Hilditch, Kepler Wessels,

Idiots to let Kepler go with Australia's lack of consistancy then.

Quote:
>Wayne Phillips etc trying out with varying degrees of
>  success, but not too much before they found some partial stability in Boon and
>  Marsh. Then Mark Taylor came along and they didnt have to look any further.

Or haven't anyway : )
Quote:

> Then there is the Aussie batting line up of the bodyline series, which a lot
>  of people consider the strongest ever, though I think the line-up in the 48'
>  series(Bradman's last) was even stronger.

You mean
Barnes
Morris
Bradman
Hasset
Harvey
Miller
Tallon
Lindwall

Not a bad little line up, no

The england 28 line p was fairly strong as well, Hobbs, Stcliffe, Hammond
and Duleepsinji are about as far down as I remember though.
Both teams in the 38 tour of england had good batting.
Brown, ?, Bradman, Hasset, McCabe, and I can't remember the rest dammit.