The King

The King

Post by bi.. » Thu, 26 Aug 1993 01:39:38


 In my opinion, None of your Hadlee, Botham, Imran and Kapil come even close
to the King - The great Garfield Sobers. He was a world class batsman, bowler,
and fielder and is of course a larger than life individual. His superlative batting
was all finesse and timing. His shots looked effortless and the ball came like
a rocket to the boundary. He used to tear apart any bowling attack - ask Lillee,
Davidson, Benaud, Trueman, Bedi, Lindwall, Miller, etc., because there was no
such thing as a good length ball to him. He never wore a thigh pad or a helmet
as his batting philosphy was that you have a bat to protect yourself! Sometimes
I wonder how these contemporary all-rounder's can be called great - they make
clumsy shots, look silly and have no footwork. So what if they play 200+ test
matches and have the max number of wickets or runs. He did'nt play for records,
and on a scale of 1 to 10, I would rate him 9 1/2 and these other all-rounder's
about 4 or 5. Quite simply, they are not in the same class. Gavaskar, Bradman,
Dexter, Ian Chappel, Compton, and a host of other great players agree on that.
So take your pick - quality or quantity?

-Bill G.

 
 
 

The King

Post by Dipak Ba » Thu, 26 Aug 1993 06:47:41

Quote:

> In my opinion, None of your Hadlee, Botham, Imran and Kapil come even close
>to the King - The great Garfield Sobers. He was a world class batsman, bowler,
>and fielder and is of course a larger than life individual.

Absolutely.....Sobers not only holds the world record for the highest
score in test cricket (365* which has survived almost 40 years) but
was also two bowlers in one -- left arm fast and left arm slow spin.
For a description of a fantastic innings and his super bowling in tandem
with Wesley Hall, read Jack Fingleton's
"The Greatest Test of All," a thrilling description of the first tied test.

Dipak.

 
 
 

The King

Post by John M. Yelt » Thu, 26 Aug 1993 10:29:35

Quote:


>Absolutely.....Sobers not only holds the world record for the highest
>score in test cricket (365* which has survived almost 40 years) but
>was also two bowlers in one -- left arm fast and left arm slow spin.
>For a description of a fantastic innings and his super bowling in tandem
>with Wesley Hall, read Jack Fingleton's
>"The Greatest Test of All," a thrilling description of the first tied test.

I know Sobers was a very good fast-medium bowler in his prime. However
stories of his versatility seem to me to be a bit exagerated. I remember
the 1966 test series in England. Sobers bowled pretty fast in partnership
with Hall and Griffith. Holford and Gibbs were the spinners. I do not
remember Sobers bowling slow at all. After that he played for Notts for
several years and as far as I remember always as a seam bowler.
He made is debut as a spinner, and bowled that way for a while, but I
do not know of him changing style within a match to suit circumstances
in the manner of, for instance, Mike Watkinson of Lancashire.
I also know he COULD bowl left arm wrist spinners, but do not know
when he actually did it.

 
 
 

The King

Post by Richard Hartl » Thu, 26 Aug 1993 23:08:17

Quote:
> the 1966 test series in England. Sobers bowled pretty fast in partnership
> with Hall and Griffith. Holford and Gibbs were the spinners. I do not
> remember Sobers bowling slow at all. After that he played for Notts for
> several years and as far as I remember always as a seam bowler.
> He made is debut as a spinner, and bowled that way for a while, but I
> do not know of him changing style within a match to suit circumstances
> in the manner of, for instance, Mike Watkinson of Lancashire.
> I also know he COULD bowl left arm wrist spinners, but do not know
> when he actually did it.

In 1960-61 in Australia, Sobers certainly used to bowl either fast
or spin.  He used to open the bowling in the tests with Hall.
This was done so that the WI could play one extra batsman.  In some of
the tests the other WI fast bowler played as well (I forget his name)
but he lacked penetration.  I seem to remember that
the video of the tied test (widely available through the ABC, I think)
shows Sobers used as an opening bowler.  Worrell would also be used
as a substitute for another fast bowler as well.  As far as spinners
are concerned, Gibbs played most tests, and maybe Ramadin and Valentine
played some of them, but without great success.

Later on in the game Sobers would bowl spinners.  I can not remember
any particular occasion, but I believe that the video I mentioned would
show Sobers bowling both types of ball.  I certainly remember personally
seeing Sobers bowling both types of ball in that series, (must have
been against Western Australia) but my
recollection is of seeing him bowl mainly spinners.
My opinion is that he was a good bowler, but not great (certainly not as
good as Botham, Imram ...), and I doubt that he would have been played for
bowling alone. Of course he was a great batsman.

richard

 
 
 

The King

Post by Cliff Shivchar » Thu, 26 Aug 1993 23:44:03



|> >

|> >
|
|> I know Sobers was a very good fast-medium bowler in his prime. However
|> stories of his versatility seem to me to be a bit exagerated. I remember
|> the 1966 test series in England. Sobers bowled pretty fast in partnership
|> with Hall and Griffith. Holford and Gibbs were the spinners. I do not
|> remember Sobers bowling slow at all. After that he played for Notts for
|> several years and as far as I remember always as a seam bowler.
|> He made is debut as a spinner, and bowled that way for a while, but I
|> do not know of him changing style within a match to suit circumstances
|> in the manner of, for instance, Mike Watkinson of Lancashire.
|> I also know he COULD bowl left arm wrist spinners, but do not know
|> when he actually did it.
|>  
|>

The ***-aged Sobers was initially selected to the WI test team as a
left arm SPINNER. Yes, as a spinner. He later developed into a much better
batsman who could bowl pace and SPIN. So the stories are NOT exaggerated.
He started out as a SPINNER.

Regards,
Cliff.

****************************************************
Cliff Shivcharan
Bell Northern Research
R & D Subsidiary of Northern Telecom
Richardson TX 75083

Any opinions expressed are mine and do NOT reflect
those of my employer.
***************************************************

 
 
 

The King

Post by P. Armor » Fri, 27 Aug 1993 02:48:29


Quote:


>>Absolutely.....Sobers not only holds the world record for the highest
>>score in test cricket (365* which has survived almost 40 years) but
>>was also two bowlers in one -- left arm fast and left arm slow spin.
>>For a description of a fantastic innings and his super bowling in tandem
>>with Wesley Hall, read Jack Fingleton's
>>"The Greatest Test of All," a thrilling description of the first tied test.
>I know Sobers was a very good fast-medium bowler in his prime. However
>stories of his versatility seem to me to be a bit exagerated. I remember
>the 1966 test series in England. Sobers bowled pretty fast in partnership
>with Hall and Griffith. Holford and Gibbs were the spinners. I do not
>remember Sobers bowling slow at all. After that he played for Notts for
>several years and as far as I remember always as a seam bowler.
>He made is debut as a spinner, and bowled that way for a while, but I
>do not know of him changing style within a match to suit circumstances
>in the manner of, for instance, Mike Watkinson of Lancashire.
>I also know he COULD bowl left arm wrist spinners, but do not know
>when he actually did it.

I vaguely remember him bowling left arm spinners when the MCC (also the
English test team ?) toured the WI in the early 1970s.

BTW, Sobers also holds the record for the most sixes in an over (6-ball
over): 6 sixes off six balls in a first-class match in England I believe.
Does anyone have more details ? (I hope this is correct :-) !)

Adios for now.

 
 
 

The King

Post by Raja » Fri, 27 Aug 1993 05:30:15


   Path: mailer.cc.fsu.edu!gatech!europa.eng.gtefsd.com!uunet!utcsri!sys.toronto.edu!armorer
   Newsgroups: rec.sport.cricket

   Organization: CSRI, University of Toronto

   Date: 25 Aug 93 17:48:29 GMT
   Lines: 33



   >>

   >>
   >>Absolutely.....Sobers not only holds the world record for the highest
   >>score in test cricket (365* which has survived almost 40 years) but
   >>was also two bowlers in one -- left arm fast and left arm slow spin.
   >>For a description of a fantastic innings and his super bowling in tandem
   >>with Wesley Hall, read Jack Fingleton's
   >>"The Greatest Test of All," a thrilling description of the first tied test.
   >I know Sobers was a very good fast-medium bowler in his prime. However
   >stories of his versatility seem to me to be a bit exagerated. I remember
   >the 1966 test series in England. Sobers bowled pretty fast in partnership
   >with Hall and Griffith. Holford and Gibbs were the spinners. I do not
   >remember Sobers bowling slow at all. After that he played for Notts for
   >several years and as far as I remember always as a seam bowler.
   >He made is debut as a spinner, and bowled that way for a while, but I
   >do not know of him changing style within a match to suit circumstances
   >in the manner of, for instance, Mike Watkinson of Lancashire.
   >I also know he COULD bowl left arm wrist spinners, but do not know
   >when he actually did it.
   >
   >

Quote:
>>>   I vaguely remember him bowling left arm spinners when the MCC (also the
>>> English test team ?) toured the WI in the early 1970s.
>>> BTW, Sobers also holds the record for the most sixes in an over (6-ball
>>> over): 6 sixes off six balls in a first-class match in England I believe.
>>> Does anyone have more details ? (I hope this is correct :-) !)
>>> Adios for now.

Sobers hit 6 X 6 for Notts. Vs Glamorgan at Swansea on Aug 31, 1968. I
remember reading in some cricket book (cannot recall the name of the
book) something along these lines: After hitting the first three
sixes, Sobers turned around and told the Glamorgan 'keeper that the
last 3 balls would also go for six apiece. In that same book, the
author said that the last six was such a massive blow, that it really
was a "twelve!"
BTW, Ravi Shastri equalled this record in a Ranji Trophy match in 1985
--
---

Psychology Dept., Florida State University
Tallahassee,  FL  32306-1051
 
 
 

The King

Post by Hibbert Dunc » Fri, 27 Aug 1993 05:33:14


Quote:



  STUFF DELETED

Sobers came on the WI team as an orthodox leg spinner. He replaced the
injured Alfred Valentine, he batted at number 10 in the first and and 9
in the second. He took 4-75, top wicket taker in the 1st innings.In
time, he was gradually promoted through the batting ranks, finally
settling at the number 6 position. In in first time as an opener, a
position he never liked, he scored 45 in 15 mins off Lindwall and
Miller. The next match he was demoted in the order, too rash said the
skipper. From then on he was taken seriously as a batsman.

 
 
 

The King

Post by sanjay.a.kh » Thu, 26 Aug 1993 06:57:09

Quote:

> In my opinion, None of your Hadlee, Botham, Imran and Kapil come even close
>to the King - The great Garfield Sobers. He was a world class batsman, bowler,
>and fielder and is of course a larger than life individual. His superlative batting

AGREED 100%

Sanjay Khan

 
 
 

The King

Post by sanjay.a.kh » Thu, 26 Aug 1993 07:02:44

Quote:

> In my opinion, None of your Hadlee, Botham, Imran and Kapil come even close
>to the King - The great Garfield Sobers. He was a world class batsman, bowler,
>and fielder and is of course a larger than life individual. His superlative batting

There will only be:

One Albert Einstein
One Elvis Presley
One Muhammad Ali
One Diego Maradonna

and

One Garfield St. Aubern Sobers

Sanjay Khan

 
 
 

The King

Post by Rajan P. Parrik » Fri, 27 Aug 1993 15:27:46

<deleted>

Quote:

>Sobers hit 6 X 6 for Notts. Vs Glamorgan at Swansea on Aug 31, 1968. I

Wasn't the bowler Malcolm Nash?

Quote:
>remember reading in some cricket book (cannot recall the name of the
>book) something along these lines: After hitting the first three
>sixes, Sobers turned around and told the Glamorgan 'keeper that the
>last 3 balls would also go for six apiece. In that same book, the
>author said that the last six was such a massive blow, that it really
>was a "twelve!"

Again, please refresh my memory. Wasn't he was caught off the 3rd or 4th
ball but the fielder stepped over the line in the process and....?

Rajan Parrikar
==============