The greatest innings ever

The greatest innings ever

Post by Arun Krishnasw Sim » Fri, 26 Apr 1991 06:19:47


Quote:

>The one I chose was by a rather diminutive man from Cootamundra, NSW,
>Australia.  The man: Sir Donald Bradman.  The match:  The fifth Test
>in the Australian tour of England, 1948.  The place:  The Oval.

   Bowral, NSW.

Quote:
>--
>     Greg Widdicombe       |  Advanced Decision Systems   |    _--_|\
>  * Up from Down Under *   |  1500 Plymouth Street,       |   /     *\
>                           |  Mountain View.  CA  94043   |   \_.--._/


Arun Simha
 
 
 

The greatest innings ever

Post by Greg Widdicom » Fri, 26 Apr 1991 05:21:21

With so much posted recently about great knocks by the likes of
Sobers, Dev, the Chappells, Miandad, McCabe and so on, I thought long
and hard about what I thought was the greatest Test innings ever.

The one I chose was by a rather diminutive man from Cootamundra, NSW,
Australia.  The man: Sir Donald Bradman.  The match:  The fifth Test
in the Australian tour of England, 1948.  The place:  The Oval.

The score: 0.

But wait a minute ... where's the flair, the flashing drives, the
crunching pull shots over mid-wicket or the delicate leg-glances?
They're nowhere of course, for this innings, lasting just two balls,
to me is what cricket's all about.

Imagine the feeling at the ground that day.  England is embarassed and
dismissed for a paltry 52.  Australia in reply is 117-1 as the Don comes
to the crease for his final Test innings.  The crowd is abuzz as they
wait expectedly for cricket history to be made.  Here we have a man, a
mere mortal, about to become a God by finishing his Test career with
an average of greater than 100.  Just four runs are required ... a
formality.  The Englishmen cheer him at the wicket.

Then second ball, the unknown Hollies bowls him with a googly and the
Don starts the long walk back to the pavillion.  Imagine the emotions
that would have swept through you if you had been at the Oval that
day.  Expectancy ... as you waited for the Don to come out to bat; Joy
... as he strode to the crease, about to make cricket history;
Disbelief ... as his wicket fell; Sorrow ... how could he get so close
and yet be so far; then ... Gratitude ... for as the Don walks off and
the crowd rises to its feet to pay tribute to this great man you
realise what he has given to cricket will never be repeated or
forgotten.

A quote by Sir Frederick Toone, the second man knighted for services
to cricket, that appeared in Bradman's book pretty much sums up what
cricket is all about and why this was such a great innings.

"DEFINITION of CRICKET" by Sir Frederick Toone.

"It is a science, the study of a lifetime, in which you may exhaust
yourself, but never your subject.  It is a contest, a duel or melee,
calling for courage, skill, strategy, and self-control."

"It is a contest of temper, a trial of honour, a revealer of
character.  It affords the chance to play the man and act the
gentleman ...".

----
Now if only some of *my* ducks were thought of this way :-).
--
     Greg Widdicombe       |  Advanced Decision Systems   |    _--_|\
  * Up from Down Under *   |  1500 Plymouth Street,       |   /     *\
                           |  Mountain View.  CA  94043   |   \_.--._/


 
 
 

The greatest innings ever

Post by David Chalme » Fri, 26 Apr 1991 09:28:55

Quote:

>Imagine the feeling at the ground that day.  England is embarassed and
>dismissed for a paltry 52.  Australia in reply is 117-1 as the Don comes
>to the crease for his final Test innings.  The crowd is abuzz as they
>wait expectedly for cricket history to be made.  Here we have a man, a
>mere mortal, about to become a God by finishing his Test career with
>an average of greater than 100.  Just four runs are required ... a
>formality.  The Englishmen cheer him at the wicket.

Not wishing to spoil a great story, but recall that this was the first
innings of the Test, so it wasn't certain that this would be his final
innings (although given England's first innings score, the chances
were pretty good).  I'm also not certain how aware the crowd or anybody
was of the "100 average" factor, given the possibility of another
innings.  They must have been aware that the 7000 run milestone was
coming up, though.

BTW, Bradman was definitely from Cootamundra.  He went to Bowral High
School, hence the nickname "the Boy from Bowral".

--

Center for Research on Concepts and Cognition, Indiana University.
"It is not the least charm of a theory that it is refutable."

 
 
 

The greatest innings ever

Post by MAHESH VEERARAGHAVAN TRIPUNITA » Fri, 26 Apr 1991 16:20:51

An excellent choice indeed! (& a well written article).
 
 
 

The greatest innings ever

Post by Nadeem Mogh » Fri, 26 Apr 1991 19:21:11


Quote:
>An excellent choice indeed! (& a well written article).

You really can say that again! An excellent article. And it underlines the
fact once again that whatever is ever written on Bradman, it would never
be sufficient.

I fully agree with the part that people would have found it absolutely heart-
breaking to see their hero returning for a duck. I say this because I know
very well had I been there, I would have found it extremely difficult to
control my emotions.

Thanks once again for the feature. And keep it up.

Nadeem Moghal

 
 
 

The greatest innings ever

Post by Nadeem Mogh » Sat, 27 Apr 1991 10:46:42

Quote:

>Imagine the feeling at the ground that day...
>The crowd is abuzz as they
>wait expectedly for cricket history to be made.  Here we have a man, a
>mere mortal, about to become a God by finishing his Test career with

                                ^^^

Quote:
>an average of greater than 100.  Just four runs are required ... a
>formality.  The Englishmen cheer him at the wicket.

Just a minor correction here, in an otherwise fine article. "God" here
should have a lower-case "g", don't you think?

Quote:
>--
>     Greg Widdicombe       |  Advanced Decision Systems   |    _--_|\
>  * Up from Down Under *   |  1500 Plymouth Street,       |   /     *\
>                           |  Mountain View.  CA  94043   |   \_.--._/


Nadeem Moghal