Youth World Cup '88

Youth World Cup '88

Post by Shashin Sh » Thu, 14 Oct 1993 15:01:45


Recently, Shariq posted an article on RSC which talked about
an Indian under-19 team which visited Pakistan 4-5 years ago.
Indeed, from the many familiar names mentioned, Jadeja seems
to be the only one who has represented India on the inter-
national circuit.  However, I was quite surprised to see
Shariq mention that the Indian under-19 side totally "outshone
the Pakistani side."  This is mainly because a few weeks back,
I happened to come across an article in a Pakistani Cricketer
Issue which talked of the Youth World Cup '88 (Australia)
where the Pakistani under-20 performed really well only to
lose to the Australians in the final.

It was the Australians who innovated the notion of a Youth
World Cup, and as a consequence, the first tourney of such
kind was organized as part of the country's Bicentennial
celebrations.  All of the then seven full members of the
International Cricket Council (ICC) sent their under-20 (or
was 21?) teams to Australia to participate in the competition.

In addition, as a promotional venture, there was also an
ICC Associates team which was comprised of players drawn from
six associate-member countries including Zimbabwe, Bangladesh,
Canada, Denmark, Holland and Bermuda.

The Australian youth side emulated the World Cup-winning
achievement of their senior counterparts by clinching the
trophy defeating the Pakistanis in the final.  The home team
were a powerful and well-balanced combination but obviously
had the advantage of playing on familiar conditions.  They
lost only one match in the earlier round-robin matches, and
that too, to the eventual runners-up, Pakistan.

Australia and Pakistan met in the final by virtue of their wins
over England and West Indies, respectively, in the sem-finals.
The most disappointing team was probably England who fielded
a relatively more reputed side with lots of experience in
county cricket.  The Sri Lankans surprised many, finishing
fifth in the tournament, ahead of New Zealand and India.  Not
so surprising was the notable fact that the ICC Associates
finished last, losing all their matches.

All the participating teams consisted of four*** players each,
the only Test player in the competition being India's leg-
spinning prodigy, Narendra Hirwani, who had a modest tournamemt.
However, a brief glance through the rosters of each individual
team reveals many players who had or have been tipped to join
their respective national sides.  In fact, an approximate count
reveals about 28 cricketers from among them who have graduated
to international cricket and many others who are established
as prominent first-class cricketers.

Surprisingly though, the best side of the tournament, Australia,
has the lowest ratio of elevations to the national squad.  Only
one player, pace bowler Wayne Holdsworth has reached the top.
Holdsworth toured England in the past summer with Allan Border's
all-conquering side.  Holdsworth, pacey and erratic, is yet to
be capped in a Test match or even a One-day International.  
In the 1988 Youth World Cup competition, Holdsworth was the
joint-highest wicket-keeper alongwith Pakistan's leg spinner
Mushtaq Ahmed.  However, Holdsworth's 19 wickets were claimed
at a much cheaper rate and he was also placed on top of the
bowling figures.

The other players who made the grade in first-class cricket are
opening batsman Stuart Law, leg-spinner Adrian Tucker, all-
rounder Joe Scuderi and paceman Allan Mullally.  Among this
quartet, Joe Scuderi narrowly missed selection for the recent
England tour when Brendon Julian was chosen ahead of him.  The
two leading lights of the World Cup, skipper Glenn Parker and
opener Brett Williams, who scored a dazzling hundred in the
final, fizzled out without making much impact in the first-
class cricket scene.

For the runners-up, Pakistan, the batting and bowling averages
were topped by Inzamamul Haq and Mushtaq Ahmed, respectively.
The West Indian tour sensation, Basit Ali and the pace-bowling
duo of Aaqib Javed and Shakeel Khan were the three others who
earned national recognition later in their careers.  In fact,
the coach of the Youth Side, Wasim Raja, had tipped Aaqib,
Mushtaq and wicketkeeper Rifaqat Ali as potential stars of
Pakistani cricket.  At least two of these youngsters have
fulfilled the senior Raja's prophecy.

Two other players who can reach the Pakistani first eleven
in the future are the then youth skipper Zahoor Elahi and
dashing middle-order batsman Shahid Nawaz.  The National
Bank opener Shahid Anwar was Pakistan's leading run-getter
in the Youth Cup and played a match-winning knock of 76 in
the semi-final against the West Indies.  Left-arm spinner
Zulfikar ***had the distinction of being the tournament's
second most economical bowler after England's off-spinner
James Boiling.

The recently-concluded Ashes contest featured six players
from the 1988 under-21 English squad.  One of these gentle-
men has also risen to the pedestal of captaincy.  Yes, the
ex-F.E.C. Mike Atherton was England's captain five years
ago as well albeit at a very different level.  In fact,
among the eight skippers of that competition, only two
have made it to the highest level as players, the other
being the 'Prince of Trinidad' Brian Lara.  The remaining
six have been pushed into cricketing oblivion.

England's most consistent performer with the bat was
Nasser Hussain and the bowling honors went to Chris Lewis
who occupied second position in the tournament averages
behind the Australian pacer Holdsworth.  The London duo from
either side of the Thames, batsman Mark Ramprakash and
medium-pacer Martin Bicknell, also amde their first mark
in the Youth Cup.  The other prominent first-class
cricketers were the Kent opener Trevor Ward, the Sussex
off-spinner James Boiling and the Lancashire stumper, Warren
Hegg.

A very intriguing feature of the 1988 Youth Cup was that
England's pace discovery of 1992, Andrew Caddick,
represented New Zealand in that tournament.  Instead of
Martin Bicknell, Caddick partnered Chris Cairns at the
bowling crease.  Cairns, incidentally, was New Zealand's
leading wicket-taker in that tournament with 15 victims to
his credit.

For the Kiwis, it was their bowling contingent which
graduated to the national squad in the following years.  
Cairns's pace partner was Chris Pringle who once took ten
wickets in Faislabad in a Test match.  The Kiwis' batting
was led by all-rounder Shane Thompson who has represented
his country in Tests as well as one-day internationals.  
Stu Roberts, a pace bowler, toured Pakistan with the New
Zealand team in 1989-90.

Very much like the Aussies, the majority of the West Indian
squad failed to fulfill their potential.  Only two out of the
four*** players have broken through in the formidable West
Indian line-up.  Both these players are left-handed batsmen
with entirely different styles--Brian Lara and the Jamaican
Jimmy Adams.

Jimmy Adams, in fact, overshadowed Lara in the 1988 Youth
Cup, topping the tournament batting averages table.  Lara,
bogged down by the captaincy hassles, had a modest tour then.
Another batting prospect who emerged in that competition was
Ron Holder, who I am quite sure is included in the West
Indian side to tour Sharjah and Sri Lanka later this year.

In addition to Narendra Hirwani, four other players from the
Indian youth squad have made it to the top level.  The two
current regulars are the left-arm spinner Venkatapathy Raju
and middle-order debut centurion Praveen Amre.  India's pace
attack then was led by Subrato Banerjee and the stumps were
guarded by wicketkeeper-cum opening batsman Nayam Mongia. As
Shariq mentioned in his article, Mongia also toured Pakistan
among the under-19 squad; incidentally he was the vice-captain
of the Indian outfit then and moreover was Kiran More's
understudy on the 1990 tour of England.  Mongia was India's
leading batsman in an otherwise thoroughly disappointing
batting performance.  Hirwani also failed to live up to his
high billing and could manage only ten expensive wickets as
compared to Mushtaq Ahmed's 19.

To digress a bit, looking at the other names that Shariq
mentions in his article, Jatin Paranjpe is established as
a first-class cricketer in India.  Last year in the Ranji's,
playing for Bombay, Paranjpe amassed 523 runs in eight innings
with an average of 74.71 (1 hundred and 3 fifties).  Hopefully,
he will manage to secure a place in the national team in the
near future.  Jadeja was ousted from the Indian team after the
dismal South African tour, but a posting on RSC yesterday
reveals that he is among the runs again (scoring 170* in the
Duleep's).  Well, its high time the selectors take another
look at him.

Ranjib Biswal plays for Orissa these days and has matured into
an all-rounder.  However, I do not have statistics for him so
any more information on him will be appreciated.  

Winston Zaidi was one of the reserves for the Indian tour of
Sri Lanka earlier this year whereas Akram Qadri, a graduate
from the MRF bowling academy, and reputed to have a decent
yorker, failed to make the Hyderabadi Ranji team last year.
Ashish Kapoor is a solid batsman and recently has also
matured into an off-spinner.  He used to play for Tamil
Nadu earlier but now plays for Punjab.  I do not have any
information for two other names Shariq mentions, Janardhan
Ramdas and Samir Mehra and information on them would also be
appreciated.

Coming back to 1988 Youth Cup, the Sri Lankans, who almost
made it to the semi-finals, included some now-familiar faces.
Opening their batting was the staunch Chandika Hathurusinghe
followed in the middle-order by all-rounder Sanath Jayasuriya.
The wicketkeeping gloves were donned by another Test debut
centurion Romesh Kaluwitharana.  The only prominent name in
the bowling department was that of Weerasinghe.  The leading
Sri Lankan scorer of that tournament, Chaminda Mendis, could
achieve no further recognition.

Even the ICC Associates side ...

read more »

 
 
 

Youth World Cup '88

Post by Jawad A » Thu, 14 Oct 1993 15:47:03


Does anyone know the current form/status/prospects of the Pakistan
youth team members:

Paceman Shakeel Khan
'keper Rifaqat Ali
skipper Zahoor Elahi
middle order batsman Zahoor Elahi
opener Shahid Anwar
Left-arm spinner Zulfikar ***

Quote:
>Even the ICC Associates side included at least two players
>who went on to represent their respective countries in one-
>dayers.  These two gentlemen were Zimbabwe's all-rounder
>Ebrahim Essop-Adam and Bangladesh's versatile cricketer
>Aminul Islam Bulbul.

Later also made it to the all-name team, hands down :)

Quote:
>horizon.  The focus in now on Malaysia where the next Youth
>Cup will take place (Aug, 1994).  The rumor is that Rohan
>alias Azhar, BritRoh, Cantona etc is going to play in that
>tourney. :)

Rumor also has it that DSQA has tickets already :)

Quote:
>Sources:  Pakistani Cricketer (Sept, 1993), Sportstar (Oct, 93)
>and Cric8wala's abysmal pit of cricketing knowledge.

good job, Shash!

j n a

 
 
 

Youth World Cup '88

Post by Salman Azh » Fri, 15 Oct 1993 09:56:14

Quote:


>Paceman Shakeel Khan

           PLays first class cricket (for Lahore?)

Quote:
>'keper Rifaqat Ali

?

Quote:
>skipper Zahoor Elahi
>middle order batsman Zahoor Elahi

           Both of them have merged into one entity who comes in one-down
for ADBO.

Quote:
>opener Shahid Anwar

           PLaying first class cricket - was one of the five cricketers
of the year of Cricketer (apksitan).  Has been doing pretty well.

Quote:
>Left-arm spinner Zulfikar ***

           Actually played a few side matches against touring sides, but
did not do well.

Quote:
>>Aminul Islam Bulbul.

           The dude literally was the whole team.

Quote:
>Later also made it to the all-name team, hands down :)

>>horizon.  The focus in now on Malaysia where the next Youth
>>Cup will take place (Aug, 1994).  The rumor is that Rohan
>>alias Azhar, BritRoh, Cantona etc is going to play in that
>>tourney. :)

>Rumor also has it that DSQA has tickets already :)

           Actually, you are right - I have a trip planned already...

Quote:
>j n a

           Salman [BOOOOOMiputra] Azhar

--
"With mathematics and physics, we insisted on perceiving the world to
be rational. So, miracles have ceased to happen. Now, vanishing is the
love and compassion which distinguishes us from the other beasts that
trod the face of this planet." -D. Salman [Quintessential] Azhar

 
 
 

Youth World Cup '88

Post by Salman Azh » Fri, 15 Oct 1993 10:05:19

Quote:

>Indeed, from the many familiar names mentioned, Jadeja seems
>to be the only one who has represented India on the inter-
>national circuit.

           Zaidi toured with Indian side in 1990.

Quote:
>Shariq mention that the Indian under-19 side totally "outshone
>the Pakistani side."

          I wouldn't say that!  They were the better of the two sides in
terms of preparation and temperament, but not quite as talented.

Quote:
> Jadeja was ousted from the Indian team after the
>dismal South African tour, ...  its high time the selectors take another
>look at him.

           Shouldn't have been dropped in the first place.  Look at what
WI made of Hooper once they knew he had talent.

           Thanks Shash!

                         Salman [Lahore 1996] Azhar

--
"With mathematics and physics, we insisted on perceiving the world to
be rational. So, miracles have ceased to happen. Now, vanishing is the
love and compassion which distinguishes us from the other beasts that
trod the face of this planet." -D. Salman [Quintessential] Azhar

 
 
 

Youth World Cup '88

Post by Sadiq Yus » Sat, 16 Oct 1993 15:25:06


Quote:

>To digress a bit, looking at the other names that Shariq
>mentions in his article, Jatin Paranjpe is established as
>a first-class cricketer in India.  Last year in the Ranji's,
>playing for Bombay, Paranjpe amassed 523 runs in eight innings
>with an average of 74.71 (1 hundred and 3 fifties).  Hopefully,
>he will manage to secure a place in the national team in the
>near future.

        Well, I hope so :-) However, one of the problems is that the West
batting is so strong, Jatin doesnt get much of a shot. He's a left hander,
usually bats about #3 for Bombay - tho I think he's opened too (not
positive about that tho). Despite his terrific season last year (mentioned
above - I believe the ton was a double, but not sure), he was not even
picked for the Duleep West Zone 16 :-(. I was very disappointed about it
myself. With Shastri, SRT, Kambli,Manjrekar, Kuruvilla,Ankola, Sanjay Patil
(all from Bombay) in the West Zone team, the old quota system means young
players like Paranjpe and Dighe, despite great seasons and potential, dont
get picked. Not to mention Sairaj Bahutule, who wasnt picked either. To
have a shot at making the national squad, these players have to be picked
for their zonal team first - hopefully that will happen next season.

 Jadeja was ousted from the Indian team after the

Quote:
>dismal South African tour, but a posting on RSC yesterday
>reveals that he is among the runs again (scoring 170* in the
>Duleep's).  Well, its high time the selectors take another
>look at him.

>Ranjib Biswal plays for Orissa these days and has matured into
>an all-rounder.  However, I do not have statistics for him so
>any more information on him will be appreciated.  

        He bowls off-spin, I believe, apart of course from being a
decentish bat . Plays for East (or at least he did
last year) in the Duleeps. In 1990 Ranji's, 3 matches, 5 inns, 389 runs, 2
tons, avg 77.80. And 120 overs, 7 for 276 at an average of 39.42.
        In the 1991 Ranji's, 4 matches, 6 innings 194 runs, 1 ton, average
32.33. And 164.3 overs, 16 wickets at an average of 24.31.

Quote:

>Winston Zaidi was one of the reserves for the Indian tour of
>Sri Lanka earlier this year whereas Akram Qadri, a graduate
>from the MRF bowling academy, and reputed to have a decent
>yorker, failed to make the Hyderabadi Ranji team last year.

        Yup, and the Hyderabad Ranji bowling attack is no great shakes
either, at least in the pace department. They have Ayub who is pretty good,
and Kanwaljeet Singh has not done enough lately. Raju is hardly ever there,
as he's off with the test team. Rajesh Yadav (the medium pacer) is still
plugging along, and does OK at Ranji level. But Hyderabad could clearly use
a fast bowler, which makes the non-appearance of Qadri all the more
puzzling (he would have had to almost deteriorate, or at best not improve a
whit not to have ever made the Ranji side, if he was indeed as good as
advertised). A pity, cos India could use good left-arm pacemen, especially
one's named Akram :-)

Quote:
>Ashish Kapoor is a solid batsman and recently has also
>matured into an off-spinner.  He used to play for Tamil
>Nadu earlier but now plays for Punjab.  I do not have any
>information for two other names Shariq mentions, Janardhan
>Ramdas and Samir Mehra and information on them would also be
>appreciated.

        Iam not sure about Samir Mehra , does anyone know where he was from
? The name did sound slightly familiar, and there is a S.Mehra playing for
Punjab , but Iam not positive about this guy.
        Janardan Ramdas was an offie from Madurai, played for Tamil Nadu
Districts 11. Currently plays for TVS in Madras, never made the TN Ranji
trophy team, I dont believe . Information courtesy Sam9, who played with
him in TN ( not to mention travelled with him long distances, from one
cricketing game to another :-). Their off-the-field exploits and parties
probably live on in legend and song in the districts of Tamil Nadu, but
Sam9 refuses to divulge the***details :-)

Quote:
>Cup will take place (Aug, 1994).  The rumor is that Rohan
>alias Azhar, BritRoh, Cantona etc is going to play in that
>tourney. :)

        I would have thought so too, but isnt he too young (not to mention
not enough of a cricketer :-) for it ? :-) :-)

Quote:
>Sources:  Pakistani Cricketer (Sept, 1993), Sportstar (Oct, 93)
>and Cric8wala's abysmal pit of cricketing knowledge.
>^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

        Hey ! Hey ! What ya mean abysmal ?

        Hot stuff article, shash. Keep em coming :-)

                        Sadiq [ the aforementioned Cricketwallah ] Yusuf

 
 
 

Youth World Cup '88

Post by sha.. » Mon, 18 Oct 1993 07:39:39

Quote:

>Recently, Shariq posted an article on RSC which talked about
>an Indian under-19 team which visited Pakistan 4-5 years ago.
>Indeed, from the many familiar names mentioned, Jadeja seems
>to be the only one who has represented India on the inter-
>national circuit.  However, I was quite surprised to see
>Shariq mention that the Indian under-19 side totally "outshone
>the Pakistani side."  This is mainly because a few weeks back,
>I happened to come across an article in a Pakistani Cricketer
>Issue which talked of the Youth World Cup '88 (Australia)
>where the Pakistani under-20 performed really well only to
>lose to the Australians in the final.

        The World Cup too place in 1987-1988 season I think. However
        The India _ Pakistan under 19 series too place in the 1988-89
        season, and it was in this season that the Indians outclassed
        Pakistan.

Quote:
>It was the Australians who innovated the notion of a Youth
>World Cup, and as a consequence, the first tourney of such
>kind was organized as part of the country's Bicentennial
>celebrations.  All of the then seven full members of the
>International Cricket Council (ICC) sent their under-20 (or
>was 21?) teams to Australia to participate in the competition.

>In addition, as a promotional venture, there was also an
>ICC Associates team which was comprised of players drawn from
>six associate-member countries including Zimbabwe, Bangladesh,
>Canada, Denmark, Holland and Bermuda.

>The Australian youth side emulated the World Cup-winning
>achievement of their senior counterparts by clinching the
>trophy defeating the Pakistanis in the final.  The home team
>were a powerful and well-balanced combination but obviously
>had the advantage of playing on familiar conditions.  They
>lost only one match in the earlier round-robin matches, and
>that too, to the eventual runners-up, Pakistan.

        I heard from someone that the matches were played on football
        grounds and the outfields were bumpy and slow and only those
        batsmen who could loft the ball could succeed on those type
        of grounds. And the pitches were said to be too slow.

- Show quoted text -

Quote:
>Australia and Pakistan met in the final by virtue of their wins
>over England and West Indies, respectively, in the sem-finals.
>The most disappointing team was probably England who fielded
>a relatively more reputed side with lots of experience in
>county cricket.  The Sri Lankans surprised many, finishing
>fifth in the tournament, ahead of New Zealand and India.  Not
>so surprising was the notable fact that the ICC Associates
>finished last, losing all their matches.

>All the participating teams consisted of four*** players each,
>the only Test player in the competition being India's leg-
>spinning prodigy, Narendra Hirwani, who had a modest tournamemt.
>However, a brief glance through the rosters of each individual
>team reveals many players who had or have been tipped to join
>their respective national sides.  In fact, an approximate count
>reveals about 28 cricketers from among them who have graduated
>to international cricket and many others who are established
>as prominent first-class cricketers.

>Surprisingly though, the best side of the tournament, Australia,
>has the lowest ratio of elevations to the national squad.  Only
>one player, pace bowler Wayne Holdsworth has reached the top.
>Holdsworth toured England in the past summer with Allan Border's
>all-conquering side.  Holdsworth, pacey and erratic, is yet to
>be capped in a Test match or even a One-day International.  
>In the 1988 Youth World Cup competition, Holdsworth was the
>joint-highest wicket-keeper alongwith Pakistan's leg spinner
>Mushtaq Ahmed.  However, Holdsworth's 19 wickets were claimed
>at a much cheaper rate and he was also placed on top of the
>bowling figures.

        Yeah I don't understand this. What happens to a player so
        good in his youth?

- Show quoted text -

Quote:
>The other players who made the grade in first-class cricket are
>opening batsman Stuart Law, leg-spinner Adrian Tucker, all-
>rounder Joe Scuderi and paceman Allan Mullally.  Among this
>quartet, Joe Scuderi narrowly missed selection for the recent
>England tour when Brendon Julian was chosen ahead of him.  The
>two leading lights of the World Cup, skipper Glenn Parker and
>opener Brett Williams, who scored a dazzling hundred in the
>final, fizzled out without making much impact in the first-
>class cricket scene.

>For the runners-up, Pakistan, the batting and bowling averages
>were topped by Inzamamul Haq and Mushtaq Ahmed, respectively.
>The West Indian tour sensation, Basit Ali and the pace-bowling
>duo of Aaqib Javed and Shakeel Khan were the three others who
>earned national recognition later in their careers.  In fact,
>the coach of the Youth Side, Wasim Raja, had tipped Aaqib,
>Mushtaq and wicketkeeper Rifaqat Ali as potential stars of
>Pakistani cricket.  At least two of these youngsters have
>fulfilled the senior Raja's prophecy.

>Two other players who can reach the Pakistani first eleven
>in the future are the then youth skipper Zahoor Elahi and
>dashing middle-order batsman Shahid Nawaz.  The National
>Bank opener Shahid Anwar was Pakistan's leading run-getter
>in the Youth Cup and played a match-winning knock of 76 in
>the semi-final against the West Indies.  Left-arm spinner
>Zulfikar ***had the distinction of being the tournament's
>second most economical bowler after England's off-spinner
>James Boiling.

>The recently-concluded Ashes contest featured six players
>from the 1988 under-21 English squad.  One of these gentle-
>men has also risen to the pedestal of captaincy.  Yes, the
>ex-F.E.C. Mike Atherton was England's captain five years
>ago as well albeit at a very different level.  In fact,
>among the eight skippers of that competition, only two
>have made it to the highest level as players, the other
>being the 'Prince of Trinidad' Brian Lara.  The remaining
>six have been pushed into cricketing oblivion.

>England's most consistent performer with the bat was
>Nasser Hussain and the bowling honors went to Chris Lewis
>who occupied second position in the tournament averages
>behind the Australian pacer Holdsworth.  The London duo from
>either side of the Thames, batsman Mark Ramprakash and
>medium-pacer Martin Bicknell, also amde their first mark
>in the Youth Cup.  The other prominent first-class
>cricketers were the Kent opener Trevor Ward, the Sussex
>off-spinner James Boiling and the Lancashire stumper, Warren
>Hegg.

>A very intriguing feature of the 1988 Youth Cup was that
>England's pace discovery of 1992, Andrew Caddick,
>represented New Zealand in that tournament.  Instead of
>Martin Bicknell, Caddick partnered Chris Cairns at the
>bowling crease.  Cairns, incidentally, was New Zealand's
>leading wicket-taker in that tournament with 15 victims to
>his credit.

>For the Kiwis, it was their bowling contingent which
>graduated to the national squad in the following years.  
>Cairns's pace partner was Chris Pringle who once took ten
>wickets in Faislabad in a Test match.  The Kiwis' batting
>was led by all-rounder Shane Thompson who has represented
>his country in Tests as well as one-day internationals.  
>Stu Roberts, a pace bowler, toured Pakistan with the New
>Zealand team in 1989-90.

>Very much like the Aussies, the majority of the West Indian
>squad failed to fulfill their potential.  Only two out of the
>four*** players have broken through in the formidable West
>Indian line-up.  Both these players are left-handed batsmen
>with entirely different styles--Brian Lara and the Jamaican
>Jimmy Adams.

>Jimmy Adams, in fact, overshadowed Lara in the 1988 Youth
>Cup, topping the tournament batting averages table.  Lara,
>bogged down by the captaincy hassles, had a modest tour then.
>Another batting prospect who emerged in that competition was
>Ron Holder, who I am quite sure is included in the West
>Indian side to tour Sharjah and Sri Lanka later this year.

>In addition to Narendra Hirwani, four other players from the
>Indian youth squad have made it to the top level.  The two
>current regulars are the left-arm spinner Venkatapathy Raju
>and middle-order debut centurion Praveen Amre.  India's pace
>attack then was led by Subrato Banerjee and the stumps were
>guarded by wicketkeeper-cum opening batsman Nayam Mongia. As

                                            ^^^^^^^
                                             Nayan

- Show quoted text -

Quote:
>Shariq mentioned in his article, Mongia also toured Pakistan
>among the under-19 squad; incidentally he was the vice-captain
>of the Indian outfit then and moreover was Kiran More's
>understudy on the 1990 tour of England.  Mongia was India's
>leading batsman in an otherwise thoroughly disappointing
>batting performance.  Hirwani also failed to live up to his
>high billing and could manage only ten expensive wickets as
>compared to Mushtaq Ahmed's 19.

>To digress a bit, looking at the other names that Shariq
>mentions in his article, Jatin Paranjpe is established as
>a first-class cricketer in India.  Last year in the Ranji's,
>playing for Bombay, Paranjpe amassed 523 runs in eight innings
>with an average of 74.71 (1 hundred and 3 fifties).  Hopefully,
>he will manage to secure a place in the national team in the
>near future.  Jadeja was ousted from the Indian team after the
>dismal South African tour, but a posting on RSC yesterday
>reveals that he is among the runs again (scoring 170* in the
>Duleep's).  Well, its high time the selectors take another
>look at him.

>Ranjib Biswal plays for Orissa these days and has matured into
>an all-rounder.  However, I do not have statistics for him so
>any more information on him will be appreciated.  

>Winston Zaidi was one of the reserves for the Indian tour of
>Sri Lanka earlier this year whereas Akram Qadri, a graduate
>from the MRF bowling academy, and reputed to have a decent

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