Rehman and Latif in finals.

Rehman and Latif in finals.

Post by Badrish Davanage » Thu, 28 Apr 1994 05:28:59


Quote:


>>Could someone enlighten me as to the advantages of this??

>The big advantage is that it encourages the batsman to stay inside his crease
>(or risk being stumped), this means that the bowler can be sure of
>where the batsman is standing (it's actually very hard for a bowler to tell
>during his run-up whether the batsman is on the crease or 2 feet outside) and
>be able to bowl a good length.  In practice, the keeper doesn't usually have
>much of a chance of making a stumping off a medium pacer because it takes too
>much time for the ball to settle properley in the gloves.  In addition, it
>gives the keeper much less chance of taking an edge.  All in all it is pretty
>much a psychological weapon, designed to get the batsman thinking about
>something other than the ball and the bowler.  

Bart, I have to disagree. I think one good reason for the keeper to
stand up to a fast bowler is because the batsmen has a tendency to
step out of the crease while playing and there is a good chance to stump
him. If the keeper can collect the ball then why can't he stump him?
Many batsmen have the tendency to lift their right leg while playing
a stroke, especially the flick. Many times the batsmen could loose
balance and get stumped. Ofcourse the keeper has to be good and really
quick. IMO a keeper shouldn't stand up to a fast bowler if he is bowling
good out***s. But if the bowler is bowling a lot of in***s
and straight ones then it's OK.

Later....

--Prakash--

 
 
 

Rehman and Latif in finals.

Post by SS » Thu, 28 Apr 1994 14:43:52


Quote:



>>>Could someone enlighten me as to the advantages of this??

>>The big advantage is that it encourages the batsman to stay inside his crease
>>(or risk being stumped), this means that the bowler can be sure of
>>where the batsman is standing (it's actually very hard for a bowler to tell
>>during his run-up whether the batsman is on the crease or 2 feet outside) and
>>be able to bowl a good length.  In practice, the keeper doesn't usually have
>>much of a chance of making a stumping off a medium pacer because it takes too
>>much time for the ball to settle properley in the gloves.  In addition, it
>>gives the keeper much less chance of taking an edge.  All in all it is pretty
>>much a psychological weapon, designed to get the batsman thinking about
>>something other than the ball and the bowler.  

>Bart, I have to disagree. I think one good reason for the keeper to
>stand up to a fast bowler is because the batsmen has a tendency to
>step out of the crease while playing and there is a good chance to stump
>him. If the keeper can collect the ball then why can't he stump him?
>Many batsmen have the tendency to lift their right leg while playing
>a stroke, especially the flick. Many times the batsmen could loose
>balance and get stumped. Ofcourse the keeper has to be good and really
>quick. IMO a keeper shouldn't stand up to a fast bowler if he is bowling
>good out***s. But if the bowler is bowling a lot of in***s
>and straight ones then it's OK.

>Later....

>--Prakash--

Though it may be theoretically possible that a keeper will manage to
capture a 125 KPH plus ball and stump the batsman, I disagree with
the notion that this is the primary motivation. What Bart had said
makes a lot of sense. It does make a lot of difference for a bowler
to have the a priori knowledge of the batsmans position on the crease.
The opportunity to get a stump or a flick-back-run-out from short leg
is secondary. In essence this is an aggressive tactic. It is a very
common strategy in Karachi where the wickets are completely devoid of
grass - in fact, at times they can even be of concrete. By keeping
the batsman in his crease and bowling a slightly shortpitched line,
it is quite possible to either get a deep midwicket catch - if the
batsman pulls uppishly, or singles in the third-man/fine-leg region.
However, the same strategy can seriously backfire on fast wickets
where the ball skids, flies or bounces more than expected. In these
cases a lot of runs can be given away in stray boundaries, of course
potentially, this can also result in a 'toothless wicket keeper.'

Regards

--
===========================  Department of Aerospace Engineering Sciences
BioServe Space Technologies       University of Colorado at Boulder  


 
 
 

Rehman and Latif in finals.

Post by de.. » Tue, 03 May 1994 23:32:26

Quote:



>>>Could someone enlighten me as to the advantages of this??

>>The big advantage is that it encourages the batsman to stay inside his crease >>(or risk being s>>where the batsman is standing (it's actually very hard for a bowler to tell
        [deleted..]
>>much a psychological weapon, designed to get the batsman thinking about
>>something other than the ball and the bowler.  

> Bart, I have to disagree. I think one good reason for the keeper to
> stand up to a fast bowler is because the batsmen has a tendency to
> step out of the crease while playing and there is a good chance to stump
> him. If the keeper can collect the ball then why can't he stump him?
> Many batsmen have the tendency to lift their right leg while playing
> a stroke, especially the flick. Many times the batsmen could loose
> balance and get stumped. Ofcourse the keeper has to be good and really
> quick. IMO a keeper shouldn't stand up to a fast bowler if he is bowling
> good out***s.   ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

  ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
 But if the bowler is bowling a lot of in***s

Quote:
> and straight ones then it's OK.

> Later....

> --Prakash--

Being in the business of keeping wickets i disagree..... Collecting only
gets difficult when the keeper looses sight of the ball because of the
batsmen. Out***s are the easiest to collect because the ball is always
in view.

Rajesh.

 
 
 

Rehman and Latif in finals.

Post by Badrish Davanage » Fri, 06 May 1994 04:57:21

Newsgroups: rec.sport.cricket
Subject: Re: Keeping Cool... prevRe: Rehman and Latif in finals.
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Organization: University of Florida, Gainesville
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Quote:




>  ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
>> IMO if the bowler is bowling good out***s then the keeper
>> shouldn't stand up.
> But if the bowler is bowling a lot of in***s
>> and straight ones then it's OK.

>> Later....

>> --Prakash--

>Being in the business of keeping wickets i disagree..... Collecting only
>gets difficult when the keeper looses sight of the ball because of the
>batsmen. Out***s are the easiest to collect because the ball is always
>in view.

>Rajesh.

My mistake, I should have put forth my views more clearly. What I meant
was this. If a bowler is bowling good out***s then the chances of
getting an outside edge is more (as compared to in***s) and in One dayers
where most of the time the bolwer is bowling with no slips then the
keeper has to cover up for the slippers. On the other hand you don't get
much edges off in***s and IMO the chances of stumping a batsmen are
more in this case. Haven't you executed a down the leg side stumping
when the batsmen has his right leg in the air beaten off a bowl swinging
away (on the leg side) from him? I admit it is tough but a very pretty
sight.

Later...

--Prakash--