Mankading

Mankading

Post by Mike Holman » Tue, 27 Dec 2005 22:41:25


We all know that the practice of running out batsmen who are backing
up too far and too early originated with Vinoo Mankad, don't we? After
all, that's why it's *called* 'mankading', innit?

Except that it didn't.

The incident with Mankad and Bill Brown occurred in 1947, and I've
found some earlier references.

IAR Peebles was playing for Middx against Yorks at Bradford in 1929
when Wilfred Rhodes had a little word with him at the end of an over:
"You're backing oop a bit too soon, Mr Peebles, so you won't mind if
we roon you out, will you?"

However, in 1898 a Parsee gentleman by the name of ME Pavri spent the
summer in England playing for Forest Hill CC and Surrey Club & Ground
(for further details of his career back home, see Sadiq). In a game at
Bournemouth, Pavri warned the batsman at his end that he was backing
up too far, but the batsman ignored the warning. Pavri put the wicket
down and the umpire gave it not out - except that Pavri immediately
produced a copy of the Laws from his back pocket, and showed the
relevant section to the umpire who hastily changed his mind.

Cheers,

Mike

 
 
 

Mankading

Post by Yuk Tan » Tue, 27 Dec 2005 22:44:40



Quote:

> We all know that the practice of running out batsmen who are
> backing up too far and too early originated with Vinoo Mankad,
> don't we? After all, that's why it's *called* 'mankading', innit?

> Except that it didn't.

[snip]

What about the Ashes incident that got Spofforth so worked up?

--
Cheers, ymt.

 
 
 

Mankading

Post by Phil » Wed, 28 Dec 2005 01:16:06

Quote:



> > We all know that the practice of running out batsmen who are
> > backing up too far and too early originated with Vinoo Mankad,
> > don't we? After all, that's why it's *called* 'mankading', innit?

> > Except that it didn't.

> [snip]

> What about the Ashes incident that got Spofforth so worked up?

Is this the one you're thinking of?

"At 114  Jones  was  run  out  in  a  way  which  gave  much
dissatisfaction   to  Murdoch  and  the  other  Australians.
Murdoch played a ball to leg, for which Lyttleton  ran.  The
ball  was  returned,  and  Jones, having completed the first
run, and thinking wrongly, but very naturally, that the ball
was dead, went out of his ground. Grace put his wicket down,
and the umpire gave him  out.  Several  of  the  team  spoke
angrily of Grace's action."

Phil.

 
 
 

Mankading

Post by Yuk Tan » Wed, 28 Dec 2005 02:41:12



Quote:



>> > We all know that the practice of running out batsmen who are
>> > backing up too far and too early originated with Vinoo Mankad,
>> > don't we? After all, that's why it's *called* 'mankading',
>> > innit?

>> > Except that it didn't.

>> [snip]

>> What about the Ashes incident that got Spofforth so worked up?

> Is this the one you're thinking of?

> "At 114  Jones  was  run  out  in  a  way  which  gave  much
> dissatisfaction   to  Murdoch  and  the  other  Australians.
> Murdoch played a ball to leg, for which Lyttleton  ran.  The
> ball  was  returned,  and  Jones, having completed the first
> run, and thinking wrongly, but very naturally, that the ball
> was dead, went out of his ground. Grace put his wicket down,
> and the umpire gave him  out.  Several  of  the  team  spoke
> angrily of Grace's action."

Thanks.  I was mistaken.

--
Cheers, ymt.

 
 
 

Mankading

Post by Jaye » Wed, 28 Dec 2005 03:03:48

Quote:






> >> > We all know that the practice of running out batsmen who are
> >> > backing up too far and too early originated with Vinoo Mankad,
> >> > don't we? After all, that's why it's *called* 'mankading',
> >> > innit?

> >> > Except that it didn't.

> >> [snip]

> >> What about the Ashes incident that got Spofforth so worked up?

> > Is this the one you're thinking of?

> > "At 114  Jones  was  run  out  in  a  way  which  gave  much
> > dissatisfaction   to  Murdoch  and  the  other  Australians.
> > Murdoch played a ball to leg, for which Lyttleton  ran.  The
> > ball  was  returned,  and  Jones, having completed the first
> > run, and thinking wrongly, but very naturally, that the ball
> > was dead, went out of his ground. Grace put his wicket down,
> > and the umpire gave him  out.  Several  of  the  team  spoke
> > angrily of Grace's action."

> Thanks.  I was mistaken.

Maybe not entirely.

"Earlier in the same match the Aussie fast bowler Spofforth ("The
Demon") had halted in his run-up and motioned to show that he could
have run out one of the england batters. They asked him "is that how
you play the game" and he allowed that it wasn't. "

From
http://groups.google.com/group/rec.sport.cricket/msg/b923f40a67771759...

Regards,
Jayen

 
 
 

Mankading

Post by Spaceman Spif » Wed, 28 Dec 2005 15:12:07

Quote:

> We all know that the practice of running out batsmen who are backing
> up too far and too early originated with Vinoo Mankad, don't we? After
> all, that's why it's *called* 'mankading', innit?

[snip]

iirc, it was because he was the first to do it in an international match-
not because he was the first to do it, period.
see the news report of bill brown's runout:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Run_out#Mankaded

--
stay cool,
Spaceman Spiff

get your own damn grateful dead lyrics.
http://arts.ucsc.edu/gdead/agdl/