Why India always gets the worst of umpiring ...

Why India always gets the worst of umpiring ...

Post by Suresh K » Sat, 19 Mar 2011 14:05:49


OK. I was going to title this post as "An Analysis of Perceived Home
Team Advantages and Actual Outcomes: Evidence From Field Research".
But this too long for the subject line, so I chose the slightly
shorter and (equally slightly) more interesting subject.

Home teams have a propensity to get umpiring decisions going their
way. Caveat: we are speaking about marginal calls here - not plain sa
daylight dismissals (such as Tendulkar's shoulder before
wicket :-)).

Brooks at NYT cites the research - here is a link:
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/18/opinion/18brooks.html?ref=opinion&p...

And while you are it please read an explanation for why Harbhajan
Singh picks on Sreesanth (Johanna Peetz and Lara Kammrath's research
shows that "you only hurt the one you love"). Hmm... Harbhajan
explaining to Roy why he slapped Sreesanth instead "'tis not that I
love you less, but that I love Sreesanth more".

And then the article also explains why Dhoni is a better captain than
Tendulkar (Dr. Jamin Halberstadt has a paper coming out in the journal
Psychology and Aging that shows that younger people read emotions
better).

SRT to a weeping Sreesanth"What is the strange sound that you emit?"
Sreesanth: (sobbing louder) "I am crying"
SRT:  "Why are you crying?"
Sreesanth:  "Harbahjan slapped me".
SRT: "And so?"
Sreesanth: "Waaaaaa" (not quite the same as Waaa Sydney).

(SRT walks away puzzled, unable to read Sreesanth's emotions).
Young Dhoni who has been watching all this, steps up.

Dhoni: to Sreesanth "Come to papa's arms my popinjay"
A beaming Sreesanth rushes to embrace his skipper.

Pawar watching the human drama unfold from behind a hedge pops out
before Dhoni and asks "Miya Kapthan Banoge?"

The rest as they say, is history (although some say that Dhoni's
attitude towards Ashwin is more geography than history).

Suresh

 
 
 

Why India always gets the worst of umpiring ...

Post by Call Centr » Sat, 19 Mar 2011 18:21:06


Quote:
> OK. I was going to title this post as "An Analysis of Perceived Home
> Team Advantages and Actual Outcomes: Evidence From Field Research".
> But this too long for the subject line, so I chose the slightly
> shorter and (equally slightly) more interesting subject.

> Home teams have a propensity to get umpiring decisions going their
> way. Caveat: we are speaking about marginal calls here - not plain sa
> daylight dismissals (such as Tendulkar's shoulder before
> wicket :-)).

> Brooks at NYT cites the research - here is a link:http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/18/opinion/18brooks.html?ref=opinion&p...

> And while you are it please read an explanation for why Harbhajan
> Singh picks on Sreesanth (Johanna Peetz and Lara Kammrath's research
> shows that "you only hurt the one you love"). Hmm... Harbhajan
> explaining to Roy why he slapped Sreesanth instead "'tis not that I
> love you less, but that I love Sreesanth more".

> And then the article also explains why Dhoni is a better captain than
> Tendulkar (Dr. Jamin Halberstadt has a paper coming out in the journal
> Psychology and Aging that shows that younger people read emotions
> better).

> SRT to a weeping Sreesanth"What is the strange sound that you emit?"
> Sreesanth: (sobbing louder) "I am crying"
> SRT: ?"Why are you crying?"
> Sreesanth: ?"Harbahjan slapped me".
> SRT: "And so?"
> Sreesanth: "Waaaaaa" (not quite the same as Waaa Sydney).

> (SRT walks away puzzled, unable to read Sreesanth's emotions).
> Young Dhoni who has been watching all this, steps up.

> Dhoni: to Sreesanth "Come to papa's arms my popinjay"
> A beaming Sreesanth rushes to embrace his skipper.

> Pawar watching the human drama unfold from behind a hedge pops out
> before Dhoni and asks "Miya Kapthan Banoge?"

> The rest as they say, is history (although some say that Dhoni's
> attitude towards Ashwin is more geography than history).

> Suresh

Without reading your link I can simply say with respect to the title
that India does not always get the worst of umpiring. All countries
suffer due to umpiring mistakes. And probably suffer in equal measure.
We in India seem to think it affects India more simply because most
cricket fans in India watch mainly India playing. So, they only get to
see India's misfortunes if appeals have gone against them. India play
various countries so most cricket fans who watch India get to watch
only a percentage of what the other countries play.

Due to this they somehow get the impression that India gets more
umpiring blunders against them than other countries. In fact if
Indians really believed that than UDRS is one way to correct that. It
can only help you. It can't hurt you. For if an umpire has given you
out you now have a chance at least to overrule the umpire.

One problem of course with the entry of UDRS is that many umpires are
now giving lbw decisions out that they normally never would have. In
that sense UDRS might just have made the bowlers smile a bit more. But
that applies to all teams equally.

 
 
 

Why India always gets the worst of umpiring ...

Post by John Hal » Sat, 19 Mar 2011 19:30:08

In article


Quote:
>OK. I was going to title this post as "An Analysis of Perceived Home
>Team Advantages and Actual Outcomes: Evidence From Field Research".
>But this too long for the subject line, so I chose the slightly
>shorter and (equally slightly) more interesting subject.

>Home teams have a propensity to get umpiring decisions going their
>way. Caveat: we are speaking about marginal calls here - not plain sa
>daylight dismissals (such as Tendulkar's shoulder before
>wicket :-)).

Considering this together with the title of your post, I conclude that
the only possible conclusion is that India never plays at home. :)
--
John Hall

                    "The covers of this book are too far apart."
                                      Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914)

 
 
 

Why India always gets the worst of umpiring ...

Post by cricdabb.. » Sat, 19 Mar 2011 22:53:33


Quote:

> Without reading your link I can simply say with respect to the title
> that India does not always get the worst of umpiring.

You're right. The West Indies do.

I wish people would read your work more carefully before
they post crazy stuff.

 
 
 

Why India always gets the worst of umpiring ...

Post by Suresh K » Sun, 20 Mar 2011 01:42:54


Quote:

> Considering this together with the title of your post, I conclude that
> the only possible conclusion is that India never plays at home. :)
> --

We do play the odd Test at home. A home series consisting of a Test,
seven ODIs and fif*** T-20s. So we get quite a few T-20 home games.

The posting was was mostly in jest. Elsewhere - well before this
article came out - I'd made the same point that there is no bias
against India and if there is any bias at all, it is in favor of home
teams.

If the Economist diaspora projections are to be believed by 2030 much
of North America and parts of Asia and UK would be home games for
India. A T20 between India and China in Santa Clara will bring a full
house. Home games for both countries. The resident Tibetan population
might give India an edge.

Suresh

 
 
 

Why India always gets the worst of umpiring ...

Post by JPD » Sun, 20 Mar 2011 09:13:35


Quote:
> Home teams have a propensity to get umpiring decisions going their
> way.

India always gets the worst of umpiring decisions because the quality
of umpiring decisions is directly proportional to observance of those
decisions - a bit like Schr?dinger's cat, really.  The decision is
just a decision until someone looks at it, at which point it becomes
either a good or bad decision.  There are 1.2 billion Indians, but
only 175 million Pakistanis, 150 million Bangladeshis, 52 million
English, 50 million South Africans, 22 million Australians, 20 million
Sri Lankans, about 6 million West Indians and 4 million New
Zealanders.  Observing decisions in proportion, and assuming a bias in
favour of the observer's compatriot affected by the decision, the
numbers show that overwhelmingly India gets the worst of umpiring
decisions.  QED.

JPD

 
 
 

Why India always gets the worst of umpiring ...

Post by Tony Sing » Sun, 20 Mar 2011 19:19:10


Quote:
> Without reading your link I can simply say with respect to the title
> that India does not always get the worst of umpiring. All countries
> suffer due to umpiring mistakes. And probably suffer in equal measure.
> We in India seem to think it affects India more simply because most
> cricket fans in India watch mainly India playing. So, they only get to
> see India's misfortunes if appeals have gone against them. India play
> various countries so most cricket fans who watch India get to watch
> only a percentage of what the other countries play.

> Due to this they somehow get the impression that India gets more
> umpiring blunders against them than other countries. In fact if
> Indians really believed that than UDRS is one way to correct that. It
> can only help you. It can't hurt you. For if an umpire has given you
> out you now have a chance at least to overrule the umpire.

> One problem of course with the entry of UDRS is that many umpires are
> now giving lbw decisions out that they normally never would have. In
> that sense UDRS might just have made the bowlers smile a bit more. But
> that applies to all teams equally.

Agree with you 100%.  It's obvious to me as well that Suresh is not
being facetious at all!

Tony