English complaints: Umpiring, Spikes, Food....

English complaints: Umpiring, Spikes, Food....

Post by vigne.. » Wed, 17 Feb 1993 22:14:40


Lewis the light in England's darkness

By Martin Johnson in Madras

     The mercury  climbed above 100F in the Chepauk Stadium during
the second Test here yesterday, but it was still possible to watch
England from an unshaded seat and shiver.  Plans are already afoot,
more than likely, to bring  their own smog  masks, a  doctor and a
chef on their next visit  here, and there is  a certain  amount of
evidence that an optician might not be a bad idea either.

     One of the  great ironies  of this game is that no fewer than
five England  players recorded their  highest Test scores over the
weekend, (although Richard Blakey, on  his debut, required  only a
single) but as everyone bar Devon Malcolm had two innings in which
to do so, telegrams  of congratulation may not  be entirely approp-
riate.

     Following  on in three  consecutive  Tests against  a side as
ordinary as India is no mean achievement, and on current form, the
prospects of  making it four in  a row in  Bombay can  scarcely be
ruled out. Neither will SriLanka offer any escape from this potent
***tail of  heat and  spin, and  the  groundsman in  Colombo  may
already have placed an order for a new set of wire brushes.

     Even the  solitary  upbeat  note  from  yesterday's  shambles
merely went to prove  that, at the moment, every silver lining has
a cloud.  Chris Lewis's maiden Test century contained some magnifi-
cent strokeplay, but not only was it made from the relaxation of a
hopeless position, it also reinforced the feeling that Lewis  will
always be a bewilderingly enigmatic cricketer.

     ''There's  only one  Chris Lewis'' was a  predictable  enough
chant from  the  here-we-go  brigade in the  reddening torso stand,
ignoring the compelling  evidence that  there are, on the contrary,
two Chris Lewises. He is very much a creature of fluctuating moods -
cheery smile one  morning, blank look and  a grunt  the next - and
his  performances appear  to vary  depending on whether there is a
full moon, or the Milky Way is in alignment with Orion.  Yesterday,
perhaps not coincidentally, was his 25th birthday.

     No one  doubts that  Lewis has as  much natural talent as Ian
Botham, not even  Botham himself, but  his  Test  averages  at the
start of this match (24 with the bat, 38 with the ball) may not be
entirely from the damned lies school of statistics.  He has bowled
the occasional  outstanding  delivery in these two  Tests, but has
more often looked innocuous, and while  he clearly gets  irritated
at queries over his fitness, so do we all.  During India's 560 for
6 declared a thigh strain restricted him to only 11 overs.

     England have  been unfortunate  with illness (although anyone
tucking into  Chinese prawns  on the eve of a  Test in Madras  can
hardly be described as  prudent) and they  have also  been unlucky
with the toss. Furthermore, they have not been kindly treated here
by one of  the umpires, Professor R S Rathore.  As far  as England
are concerned, he was a  short-sighted professor on  Saturday when
he gave three ropey leg-before decisions, and an absent-minded one
yesterday when he was busy dispensing seven-ball overs.

     There is  also some  substance  for England's suspicions that
India's batsmen  were none  too subtle  about how they  used their
spikes (although for county cricketers this constitutes one of the
better  examples  of pots  and  kettles) and  the  wear  and  tear,
natural or  otherwise, left several  small  craters  for the  home
spinners to aim at when England batted.

     However, on  the few  occasions they  hit the bull's-eye, the
ball did  far too  much to  get anyone  out, and  England's second-
innings performance in losing their  first six wickets for 99 runs
on a pitch that offered India much less assistance than the one in
Calcutta, would have been faintly embarrassing for a club side.

     In the  first  innings, with  Alec Stewart and Graeme Hick in
the 60's, England  declined from 157 for 1 to 220 for 7, and heart-
ening though it was to see Neil  Fairbrother's  enterprising 83 at
least partly  offsetting  the suspicion  that  England's best left-
handed No 5  was  stuck  behind  a  microphone  in the  Sky TV box,
Fairbrother's  innings was compiled  from every bit as  hopeless a
position as Lewis's.

     When  England followed on  278 runs behind, any prospect they
had of making a  fist of it  evaporated when  India's  mischievous
tactic of giving  the new ball  to two  seam bowlers  resulted  in
Kapil Dev, who completed  5,000 Test runs with  the bat on  Friday,
ripping  out Stewart  and Hick  for  two  ducks to  move within 15
victims of Richard Hadlee's 431.

     Stewart was  palpably leg before; Hick played no sort of shot
to give a catch to  second slip, and Mike  Gatting  ought to  have
completed a hat-trick of zeroes  when Kiran More spilled him third
ball off Kapil, diving across first slip.

     Gatting, though, was  soon lbw playing the sweep shot that he
knows full well  carries a much  higher risk  with Indian  umpires
than at home, which, added to  being ill, dropping  a  ludicrously
simple catch, and getting himself run out by  the fielder at short
leg in the first innings, just about summed up his match.

     Robin Smith exorcised one  or two ghosts against the spinners
by making 52  until he pushed  a catch to short  leg with that dis-
tinctively stiff-wristed lunge of his, and fell to Anil Kumble for
the third time in the series. Kumble was  spied on in South Africa
by  Keith Fletcher  before the series  began, and his ''nothing to
fear from this bloke'' verdict now looks faintly daft.

     He was right in a way, as Kumble barely turns it, but perhaps
Fletcher should  have spent more  time spying  on his  own batsmen.
Fairbrother's  grotesque  slog ballooned  to mid-on, and  Kumble's
third wicket in the space of four overs  yesterday involved Blakey
offering no stroke to a perfectly  straight  ball.  At this  point
Mohammad Azharuddin's dubious credentials as  a private eye took a
further knock when he took Kumble off.

     By the time  Kumble returned (to  dismiss Ian  Salisbury with
his seventh ball) England had gone from 99 for 6 to 172 for 6, and
Lewis was in full cry.  The six over long-on off Venkatapathy Raju
to reach his century (out of 133) was a  massive  blow, but  sadly,
not half as  big as the one  currently being  administered  to Eng-
land's ego.

Thanks :     The Independent  [February  15, 1993, Monday]

=====

Vicky:
UMass, Feb 16, 1993

 
 
 

English complaints: Umpiring, Spikes, Food....

Post by Rohan Koduvayur Kri Chandr » Thu, 18 Feb 1993 05:37:35

Quote:

>Lewis the light in England's darkness

>By Martin Johnson in Madras

>     Following  on in three  consecutive  Tests against  a side as
>ordinary as India is no mean achievement, and on current form, the

COme on!!!! Give India a bit of credit!!!! No team follows on thrice in
succession against an *ordinary* side!!!

Quote:
>with the toss. Furthermore, they have not been kindly treated here
>by one of  the umpires, Professor R S Rathore.  As far  as England

Here we go again!!! Can't they just stop complaining for once??? I wish the
Indian press had complained about all the pathetic decisions we saw in the
1990 series in England, and the Pakistani press about all the ludicrous
decisions which went England's way last summer....

Quote:
>     There is  also some  substance  for England's suspicions that
>India's batsmen  were none  too subtle  about how they  used their
>spikes (although for county cricketers this constitutes one of the
>better  examples  of pots  and  kettles) and  the  wear  and  tear,
>natural or  otherwise, left several  small  craters  for the  home
>spinners to aim at when England batted.

Another ***y excuse. Can they not just accept that they were outplayed by
a better team??? Is it that damn humiliating??????

Quote:
>     However, on  the few  occasions they  hit the bull's-eye, the
>ball did  far too  much to  get anyone  out, and  England's second-
>innings performance in losing their  first six wickets for 99 runs
>on a pitch that offered India much less assistance than the one in
>Calcutta, would have been faintly embarrassing for a club side.

Not really. A club side would have been bowled out for far less, so 99-6 would
have been an excellent position for them.

Quote:
>     Gatting, though, was  soon lbw playing the sweep shot that he
>knows full well  carries a much  higher risk  with Indian  umpires
>than at home,

This is so true!!!! His home umpires would never give Gatting out lbw. Not
a hope in hell of that happening.

Quote:
> which, added to  being ill, dropping  a  ludicrously
>simple catch, and getting himself run out by  the fielder at short
>leg in the first innings, just about summed up his match.

Oh.. I forgot - he was sick  - that's why England lost.

Am I the only one getting fed up of the BS these English journalists churn out
????

Rohan
--
*******************************************************************************
Manchester United Football Club         *  INDIA - We are the Champions.....
_______________________________         *          England are the losers...
Leading the way in the nineties         *  ODI's: India 1  England 1
1990 F.A.Cup                            * TEST's: India 2  England 0
1991 Cup Winners Cup                    *  KAPIL DEV - 416 / 5031
1992 League Cup & Super Cup             *  AZHAR - 3485 (45.86/12 in 79/3)
1993 Premier League??                   ***************************************
1994 Treble??                           *     #1 fan of Steffi and Stefan
*******************************************************************************


 
 
 

English complaints: Umpiring, Spikes, Food....

Post by Mehul Des » Thu, 18 Feb 1993 08:21:56

Quote:

>Lewis the light in England's darkness
>By Martin Johnson in Madras
>     The mercury  climbed above 100F in the Chepauk Stadium during
>the second Test here yesterday, but it was still possible to watch
>England from an unshaded seat and shiver.  Plans are already afoot,
>more than likely, to bring  their own smog  masks, a  doctor and a
>chef on their next visit  here, and there is  a certain  amount of
>evidence that an optician might not be a bad idea either.

....
...........blah, blah, blah,

Quote:
>     England have  been unfortunate  with illness (although anyone
>tucking into  Chinese prawns  on the eve of a  Test in Madras  can
>hardly be described as  prudent) and they  have also  been unlucky
>with the toss. Furthermore, they have not been kindly treated here
>by one of  the umpires, Professor R S Rathore.  As far  as England
>are concerned, he was a  short-sighted professor on  Saturday when
>he gave three ropey leg-before decisions, and an absent-minded one
>yesterday when he was busy dispensing seven-ball overs.

...........................
Just sore looseres,
1. It's the home crowd's prerogative to prepare pitches, have u
ever seen a spinning wicket in England; you woudn't call that
biased would you! just England's or Aussie or the home court adv.

2. LBW's you say; Rathore wasn't kind with the LBW's: they were
close, some of them plum even by trevor bailey's an CMJ's account.
they woudn't have altered the course of th match!

3. Using spikes to make crator's in the wicket: balooney
just being sore loosers i think

4. Englands pitfalls: a. sloppy selection
                      b. omission of Gower
                      c. gooch's got an attitude he better work at

5. Hope for an India_Win in Bombay by Innings to put all questionsat
rest!

Quote:
>     There is  also some  substance  for England's suspicions that
>India's batsmen  were none  too subtle  about how they  used their
>spikes (although for county cricketers this constitutes one of the
>better  examples  of pots  and  kettles) and  the  wear  and  tear,
>natural or  otherwise, left several  small  craters  for the  home
>spinners to aim at when England batted.
>Thanks :     The Independent  [February  15, 1993, Monday]
>=====
>Vicky:
>UMass, Feb 16, 1993

--
Life is Complex --
It has two parts: Real & Imaginary

 
 
 

English complaints: Umpiring, Spikes, Food....

Post by KANDALA SRINIV » Thu, 18 Feb 1993 09:44:56


Quote:
>                  c. gooch's got an attitude he better work at

>5. Hope for an India_Win in Bombay by Innings to put all questionsat
>rest!

Not really. The mighty English tabloid press will find excuses if they lose.

srini

--
Blue Jays: 1992 World Champions

 
 
 

English complaints: Umpiring, Spikes, Food....

Post by Mehul Des » Thu, 18 Feb 1993 14:10:22


Quote:
>Am I the only one getting fed up of the BS these English journalists churn out
>????

No u're not alone, the tabloid press is now at prime time yellow journalism.

1. Remember the incident againt pakistan when the press acused Akram of
  Ball handling and then later had to pay compesatory damages for BS they
  published.

2. Remember the 1986 series againt England when Kapil led India to a 2-0
  series win in England; then it was Chetan Sharma's "chucking" delivery.

I think the English press like thier mighty cricket team has found a new
bottomless abyss!

Mehul Desai

--
Life is Complex --
It has two parts: Real & Imaginary

 
 
 

English complaints: Umpiring, Spikes, Food....

Post by Martin Whi » Thu, 18 Feb 1993 22:22:16


|>

|>
|>
|>>Am I the only one getting fed up of the BS these English journalists churn out
|>>????
|>
|>No u're not alone, the tabloid press is now at prime time yellow journalism.
|>

  While I have to agree that English Tabloid Journalism is probably the worse in the world, Martin Johnson does not fall into that catergory.
   While reporting on the play itself and people's reactions to it (whatever they are) he generally takes the***out of everybody involved from ALL parties involved. He takes a humorous view of  all that is going on and I believe writes a great column for the Independent.
   In short I believe that while a lot of journalists are full of crap, Johnson
generally isn't - he just reports what is done and said whether right or wrong.
   I don't want to start/continue a flame fest here, I just had to defend Martin Johnson's column, as I don't want it thought of in the same breath as a
typical Sun back page article on how we we cheated etc etc

  Trogg



 
 
 

English complaints: Umpiring, Spikes, Food....

Post by war.. » Fri, 19 Feb 1993 03:27:02

Quote:
>>By Martin Johnson in Madras

>>     Following  on in three  consecutive  Tests against  a side as
>>ordinary as India is no mean achievement, and on current form, the

>COme on!!!! Give India a bit of credit!!!! No team follows on thrice in
>succession against an *ordinary* side!!!

I believe the article did praise India for their performance so dont get
so damn DEFENSIVE. Englans isnt at war with India yet, were waiting until
the last test. :-).

India, from their recent performances outside India where the ball
doesnt spin at all, should still be considered ordinary if compared to
the West Indes (say) or (dare I say it) Pakistan.
Ordinary does sound a touch harsh a word to use but it isnt that far from the
truth IMHO. England of course are thus, DIRE.

Quote:
>>with the toss. Furthermore, they have not been kindly treated here
>>by one of  the umpires, Professor R S Rathore.  As far  as England

>Here we go again!!! Can't they just stop complaining for once??? I wish the
>Indian press had complained about all the pathetic decisions we saw in the
>1990 series in England, and the Pakistani press about all the ludicrous
>decisions which went England's way last summer....

It is in the British nature to complain.
It is also in EVERYONE's nature to find SENSIBLE excuses for defeat.
Blaming 1 umpire is of course NOT sensible and rather stupid so I agree
with u here.
However biased the press is though, usually there is something behind it.
Perhaps someone UNBIASED who watched most of the game could judge the merit
of the decisions. As u suggest they probably evened out anyway.

Quote:
>>     There is  also some  substance  for England's suspicions that
>>India's batsmen  were none  too subtle  about how they  used their
>>spikes (although for county cricketers this constitutes one of the
>>better  examples  of pots  and  kettles) and  the  wear  and  tear,
>>natural or  otherwise, left several  small  craters  for the  home
>>spinners to aim at when England batted.

>Another ***y excuse. Can they not just accept that they were outplayed by
>a better team??? Is it that damn humiliating??????

NO ONE has denied they were outplayed by the better team, and I thought the
article said as such (though I cant be sure).
All English cricket FANS (note the distinction) know exactly why we lost --
we just played not as well as India.

Please dont associate us with the English press -- they just write what
the average person wants to read.

I feel you are getting hypocritical about damaging the wicket too.
EVERY country does this if they think the ball will turn.
Without even seeing a ball bowled I can imagine Indian batsmen
doing this.
England did it for their spinners ALL the time. Ive even done it myself.

Of course, the umpires apparently didnt warn any batsmen of doing it, and
said that the wicket was in good shape.
The ensuing law suit against the Independent (?) will prove interesting.
Lets wait and see who says what.

Quote:
>>     Gatting, though, was  soon lbw playing the sweep shot that he
>>knows full well  carries a much  higher risk  with Indian  umpires
>>than at home,

>This is so true!!!! His home umpires would never give Gatting out lbw. Not
>a hope in hell of that happening.

This is provocative BULLSHIT designed to just***people off. You may think
youre being witty and clever but most people will believe what u say cos
they are so stupid.

The real reason is that there is so much less spin in England that the
umpires have slightly different views about giving LBW's.
Also, Indian batsmen play spin so much better (as we have seen) and so
probably use the sweep shot less.

I feel this is a very interesting anomoly in umpiring and should be discussed
further.

Quote:

>Oh.. I forgot - he was sick  - that's why England lost.

Youre getting irksome again. Surely you accept that illnesses among the
players (caused by their own stupidness, I agree) will affect their
performances.
It is not why they lost the match, but it will play a small role.

Have u ever tried to bat when sick!

Quote:
>Am I the only one getting fed up of the BS these English journalists churn out
>????

Perhaps u should stick to the London Times. And I bet you dont even look at
the Sun or the Mirror -- now thats BS.
You should be glad you get such comprehensive and provocative cricket
coverage.

Besides, why do u expect everything written in a British paper to be
gospel -- newspapers arent put out to inform the public, u know,
they are there for entertainment.

Quote:

>Rohan

Tony Begley
And dont stuff MUFC down my neck, Villa will win the title anyway :-).

--