Refinishing wood heads

Refinishing wood heads

Post by Doug Teete » Tue, 04 Oct 1994 20:13:20


  I'm in the process of refinishing some "wood" wood heads. I'm considering
  using wood bleach to remove the color of the old finish where is refuses
  to be sanded off.  Does anybody have any experience with this?  Will the
  bleach ruin the insert if the bleach makes contact with it?

  Thanks in advance for any/all pointers, tips etc.

  Doug

Doug Teeter
Ontario College Application Service
370 Speedvale Ave. West
Guelph Ontario CAN. N1H 6M4
(519) 763-4725 x242

 
 
 

Refinishing wood heads

Post by Dave Tutelm » Wed, 05 Oct 1994 20:01:45



Quote:
>  I'm in the process of refinishing some "wood" wood heads. I'm considering
>  using wood bleach to remove the color of the old finish where is refuses
>  to be sanded off.  Does anybody have any experience with this?  Will the
>  bleach ruin the insert if the bleach makes contact with it?

Most books that I've seen on refinishing wood wood heads recommend covering
the insert (also the soleplate and ***) with masking tape for many of
the operations.  Couldn't hurt here.

BTW, there are books and articles around on the subject.  There's even a
two-pager-with-pictures in the Golfsmith catalog, though it used to be
a lot better than it is now.  (BTW, it says nothing about bleach.)

Hope this helps.
Dave

 
 
 

Refinishing wood heads

Post by Carl Mc Kinle » Wed, 05 Oct 1994 14:53:00

Doug;

If you are not changing the color, or are going to stain
the heads a darker color it is not necessary to remove all
the old color. Bleaching is only needed when lightening the
color. I've never found this necessary(and I've refinished
alot of woods). A word of caution, when sanding avoid removing
too much wood. You could change the characteristics of the
club.
Hope this is useful.

Carl's Golf Shop

 
 
 

Refinishing wood heads

Post by Doug Teete » Wed, 05 Oct 1994 18:02:47


Quote:

> If you are not changing the color, or are going to stain
> the heads a darker color it is not necessary to remove all
> the old color. Bleaching is only needed when lightening the
> color. I've never found this necessary(and I've refinished
> alot of woods). A word of caution, when sanding avoid removing
> too much wood. You could change the characteristics of the
> club.
> Hope this is useful.

> Carl's Golf Shop

  The heads I'm working on a fairly old with a very dark finish.  After a
  light sanding the hosel and some other areas (eg. top of the toe) became
  very light (down to the wood).  If I stain them as is, they will appear
  blotchy.  I guess my options  are A) use a really dark or solid colour. I
  don't really want to do this to such nice looking wood. B) experiment with
  the bleach on a $2 garage sale special :-).

  Carl,

    Do you follow the method described in the books using a semi-paste wood
    filler after staining?  Is this required?  Do you use the stuff sold by
    the component suppliers or have you found a hardware store equivalent?
    (Same questions for face sealer and primer/sealer for sole plate)

    Thanks for any pointers, tips or info. you can provide.

  Doug

Doug Teeter
Ontario College Application Service
370 Speedvale Ave. West
Guelph Ontario CAN. N1H 6M4
(519) 763-4725 x242

 
 
 

Refinishing wood heads

Post by Carl Mc Kinle » Thu, 06 Oct 1994 15:45:00

Doug,

The following is the method I use in refinishing.

1. Remove old ***.
2. Note location and types of decals (if you are going
   to replace them). This is not necessary but I replace
   decals on customer clubs.
3. Strip old finish from club head(I use Zip Strip from
   local hrdwre store). Caution, keep *** off insert
   and other plastic materials.
4. After stripping sand head using a medium sandpaper(150)
   and then a fine paper.
5. Sand the face (remember to not change the bulge and roll).
   I measure these before starting.
6. Clean and recut the face scoring lines. I use a hacksaw type
   blade(special from Golfworks). Regular hacksaw blade can make
   the scoring lines too wide. Also, do not saw across any face
   screws(just looks better).
7. Check face screws and sole plate screws for tightness. If
   any are loose reseat using a bit of shaft epoxy on the screw.
   Likewise repair loose insert and shaft.
8. Sand as necessary after making any repairs.
9. Steelwool club head using fiiine wool(I use 000).
10. Before staining I coat the face with polyeurothane(using a
    small brush). This is to avoid stain on the face. Some places
    use tape or a special paste is available but I prefer using
    poly.
11. After the poly has setup you are ready to stain. I tape a
    paper towel around the shaft to avoid staining the shaft and
    grip. I leave this on until the refinishing is complete.
    I use a water base stain. I dip the head in the stain, then
    blot of the excess with a paper towel.
12. When the stain has dried(only takes a few moments) I apply a
    coat of sealer. This is a paste that aids in tightening the
    wood grain. Allow the sealer to partly dry(begins to glaze)
    and wipe excess off(I use burlap). Now allow to finish drying.

  Next steps are to prepare to apply finish.

13. Sand face down to bare wood and insert. Clean sealer from
    scoring grooves.
14. Using some type of pick clean any lettering on the sole plate.
    These can then be repainted(use small brush to paint in letter-
    ing. Wipe excess from sole plate using lacquer thinner).
15. Lightly steelwool the entire head(000). Be sure the head is
    clean of any dust(I use a tack cloth).
16. You are now ready to apply the first coat of varnish(poly).
    The method I prefer is to dip the head in the poly, let excess
    run off, and stand club on grip end to dry. Allow 24 hrs or
    more (depending on climate) for drying.
17. Lightly steelwool and apply the second coat. Within one hour
    apply the third coat(previous coat should be tacki). Again
    allow over night drying.
18. Lightly steelwool again. Now is when to apply any decals.
    Apply the forth and final coat. Allow overnight to dry.
19. Now the club can be rewhipped.
    Even though the club seems dry to the touch it is best to
    not begin playing the club right away. The finish is still
    soft.

                These instruction are modelled after Golfworks
           program. I buy most of my materials from local hrdwre
           stores but some things are real speciality items.
           I also use alot of power tools(sanders, drill press,
           buffers, etc) all these processes can be done by hand.

           The best advise I can give is take your time.

Carl's Golf Shop

 
 
 

Refinishing wood heads

Post by Doug Teete » Thu, 06 Oct 1994 18:57:55

 First, a public thank you to Carl for his response to my refinishing query.

 I think it would make a great addition to the archives where Dave's
 clubmaking articles are kept.

Quote:
> Doug,

> The following is the method I use in refinishing.

> 1. Remove old ***.
> 2. Note location and types of decals (if you are going
>    to replace them). This is not necessary but I replace
>    decals on customer clubs.
> 3. Strip old finish from club head(I use Zip Strip from
>    local hrdwre store). Caution, keep *** off insert
>    and other plastic materials.
> 4. After stripping sand head using a medium sandpaper(150)
>    and then a fine paper.
> 5. Sand the face (remember to not change the bulge and roll).
>    I measure these before starting.
> 6. Clean and recut the face scoring lines. I use a hacksaw type
>    blade(special from Golfworks). Regular hacksaw blade can make
>    the scoring lines too wide. Also, do not saw across any face
>    screws(just looks better).
> 7. Check face screws and sole plate screws for tightness. If
>    any are loose reseat using a bit of shaft epoxy on the screw.
>    Likewise repair loose insert and shaft.
> 8. Sand as necessary after making any repairs.
> 9. Steelwool club head using fiiine wool(I use 000).
> 10. Before staining I coat the face with polyeurothane(using a
>     small brush). This is to avoid stain on the face. Some places
>     use tape or a special paste is available but I prefer using
>     poly.
> 11. After the poly has setup you are ready to stain. I tape a
>     paper towel around the shaft to avoid staining the shaft and
>     grip. I leave this on until the refinishing is complete.
>     I use a water base stain. I dip the head in the stain, then
>     blot of the excess with a paper towel.
> 12. When the stain has dried(only takes a few moments) I apply a
>     coat of sealer. This is a paste that aids in tightening the
>     wood grain. Allow the sealer to partly dry(begins to glaze)
>     and wipe excess off(I use burlap). Now allow to finish drying.

>   Next steps are to prepare to apply finish.

> 13. Sand face down to bare wood and insert. Clean sealer from
>     scoring grooves.
> 14. Using some type of pick clean any lettering on the sole plate.
>     These can then be repainted(use small brush to paint in letter-
>     ing. Wipe excess from sole plate using lacquer thinner).
> 15. Lightly steelwool the entire head(000). Be sure the head is
>     clean of any dust(I use a tack cloth).
> 16. You are now ready to apply the first coat of varnish(poly).
>     The method I prefer is to dip the head in the poly, let excess
>     run off, and stand club on grip end to dry. Allow 24 hrs or
>     more (depending on climate) for drying.
> 17. Lightly steelwool and apply the second coat. Within one hour
>     apply the third coat(previous coat should be tacki). Again
>     allow over night drying.
> 18. Lightly steelwool again. Now is when to apply any decals.
>     Apply the forth and final coat. Allow overnight to dry.
> 19. Now the club can be rewhipped.
>     Even though the club seems dry to the touch it is best to
>     not begin playing the club right away. The finish is still
>     soft.

>                 These instruction are modelled after Golfworks
>            program. I buy most of my materials from local hrdwre
>            stores but some things are real speciality items.
>            I also use alot of power tools(sanders, drill press,
>            buffers, etc) all these processes can be done by hand.

>            The best advise I can give is take your time.

> Carl's Golf Shop

Doug Teeter
Ontario College Application Service
370 Speedvale Ave. West
Guelph Ontario CAN. N1H 6M4
(519) 763-4725 x242