Why we don't cart around in Europe.

Why we don't cart around in Europe.

Post by Marcel Bigg » Fri, 11 Aug 1995 04:00:00


To add to the discussions on golf carts, I would like to present possible
reasons why carts are so scarce on German golf courses.

(1)     Golfing is already expensive without carts.
        The average greenfee at German private golf
        courses, for example, is US$ 50.-- on weekdays and US$ 70.--
        on weekends. Already a substantial outlay . Adding
        a cart and the total daily price tag will inflate to over
        US$ 100.--.

(2)     Environmental regulations prohibit the construction of extensive
        golf infrastructure. From how much forest can be cleared to
        how many access roads and parking spaces can be constructed, a
        wide array of laws, regulations and obligations restrict what
        golf clubs can do with the natural environment.

(3)     The weather is more rainy. Golf carts are unsuited for soggy
        ground.

(4)     Using a golf cart conflicts with an eprit-de-sport feeling.
        Walking is considered an integral of part of the sport
        of golf. Furthermore, people would like to play
        like the pros on TV. One will never see them carting around.
        As a result, it is considered very uncool to take a cart. At
        my club, Lindau-Bad Schachen, you would make a dork out of
        yourself doing it.

--
                               Smile!
                            Marcel Bigger
                          Purdue University

 
 
 

Why we don't cart around in Europe.

Post by Bill Merten » Wed, 16 Aug 1995 04:00:00

Quote:

>To add to the discussions on golf carts, I would like to present possible
>reasons why carts are so scarce on German golf courses.

>(1) Golfing is already expensive without carts.
>    The average greenfee at German private golf
>    courses, for example, is US$ 50.-- on weekdays and US$ 70.--
>    on weekends. Already a substantial outlay . Adding
>    a cart and the total daily price tag will inflate to over
>    US$ 100.--.

>(2) Environmental regulations prohibit the construction of extensive
>    golf infrastructure. From how much forest can be cleared to
>    how many access roads and parking spaces can be constructed, a
>    wide array of laws, regulations and obligations restrict what
>    golf clubs can do with the natural environment.

>(3) The weather is more rainy. Golf carts are unsuited for soggy
>    ground.

>(4) Using a golf cart conflicts with an eprit-de-sport feeling.
>    Walking is considered an integral of part of the sport
>    of golf. Furthermore, people would like to play
>    like the pros on TV. One will never see them carting around.
>    As a result, it is considered very uncool to take a cart. At
>    my club, Lindau-Bad Schachen, you would make a dork out of
>    yourself doing it.

>--
>                               Smile!
>                            Marcel Bigger
>                          Purdue University


Your forth point sums it all up.  Driving in a cart destroys your feel for the game.
It takes time to plan a well played golf shot.  Walking up the fairway gives you a
minute to reflect on the shot you just took, and plan your next shot.  By the time
you arrive at your ball you have made up your mind what you want to do.  Then you
simply address the ball and swing.  With a cart you rush up to your ball.  You will
still be angry at yourself for the less than perfect previous shot, and you haven't
even started to plan your next shot.  At that point you will either, a) hit another
poorly planned shot, or b) stand there thinking about what got you into this mess
and how to get yourself out of it.  Add to this the difficulty of finding a ball
when you are not able to walk directly down the line of flight, and not having the
correct club because you were not able to determine your lie and distance, and what
it boils down to is, carts are just plain slower.

I regularily play about eight different courses. Half of them require you to use a
cart, the other half are walked by most golfers.  The walking courses average around
four hours to play a round, the riding courses average closer to five hours.  However,
I admit some of this is caused by slow overweight hackers having a preference for the
riding courses.

The fastest rounds I have ever played (3hrs 10m is my record), and the best scores
I have ever posted have all been done on foot.

Hit'em long. (straight impresses no one)

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