"Great clubs, bad player," or, "why bother before you're ready?"

"Great clubs, bad player," or, "why bother before you're ready?"

Post by Neelav Haj » Sun, 22 Jan 1995 12:51:41


While I've only been golfing for a year,  I think it's enough experience
to pose this question:  Am I the only golfer in the world who thinks that
new, expensive clubs should only be an option  after people have truly
sharpened ther skills?  Why do so many people in the Bad Golfers' Society
(which I am a current member of)  spend so much time investing in new
equipment when they really should be getting regular lessons and simply
practicing?

While I realize tennis might be a clumsy analog, it's the only
equipment-dependent sport I'm really good at.  Most of the people I grew
up with stuck with inexpensive racquets for a few years.  Once they became
competent, competitive players, they started buying "better" equipment.  
I remember when the widebody racquet craze first hit, I encountered A LOT
of players who could hit VERY hard and fast as a result, BUT STILL WEREN'T
SIGNIFICANTLY BETTER.  Hard and fast means very little if you don't have a
matchng set of skills.

Golf seems even more suspect.  For every good player who buys an expensive
driver and uses it to his or her advantage, there's a bad golfer who might
add 10-15 yards to a drive, but who wouldn't shave any strokes off their
game (10 yards farther means very little if it's in the rough or you can't
hit a consistent iron anyway).  I invested in a $200 set of "Arnold Palmer
Tour" clubs...11 standard clubs, stainless, cavity back, VERY simple and
economical.  As of now, I'm not even using the driver, 3 iron and 4 iron,
and rarely use the 6 or 8 iron.  This is because I am a beginner, but
maybe other bad golfers (regardless of experience) should also think about
ditching clubs that don't necessarily make a positive impact on their
games.  As I get better, I'll expand the number of clubs I take to the
course.

While some people get really e***d about a new driver or new irons, I
experience that same e***ment (IMHO) after a good lesson or a productive
practice.  Although I realize that  I am opening myself up to criticism,
I'm going to dole out some advice to you other bad golfers:  Forget about
getting new, magical clubs that promise a better game.  Instead, take
lessons, practice, and buy the clubs when you really NEED them.

--
Neelav Hajra
Student, University of Michigan
"no wonderfully inventive, exciting, and/or portentious quotes at this time"

 
 
 

"Great clubs, bad player," or, "why bother before you're ready?"

Post by Putt » Sun, 22 Jan 1995 16:29:42

You sound like a wise beginner who will undoubtedly steadily improve your
game.
I've played for about 12 years now and have seen my friends fall prey to
everything
you describe.  

I invested my time and money in lessons, reading and practicing.  I now
play
nearly 90 rounds per year and continue to improve my handicap (from 27 to
an
all time low of 5 at this point).

Great attitude.  Now just learn the rules and ediquite of golf..... and
keep up
a brisk pace and you'll be on your way.

Good Luck

Puttem

 
 
 

"Great clubs, bad player," or, "why bother before you're ready?"

Post by Oliver Hsia » Mon, 23 Jan 1995 06:44:31

I agree with the original poster as well.  I think there's a certain
threshold of quality of equipment.  I've had 2 sets of clubs in my 8
years of playing: my dad's old Arnold Palmers (I don't even know exactly
what they are), and then my Tommy Armours for when I broke 90
consistently.  My 845s are 6 years old (yup, I got 'em before they were hot
for under $300) and
I don't think I'll get rid of them in the next 5 years.  My advice to a
beginner is: get a *decent* starter set (used or new) and then when you
understand the game better and can play consistently better move on to
the more expensive stuff.
--
-----------------------
Oliver Hsiang

(617) 493-4493

 
 
 

"Great clubs, bad player," or, "why bother before you're ready?"

Post by Steve Thomps » Mon, 23 Jan 1995 19:45:53

: While I've only been golfing for a year,  I think it's enough experience
: to pose this question:  Am I the only golfer in the world who thinks that
: new, expensive clubs should only be an option  after people have truly
: sharpened ther skills?  Why do so many people in the Bad Golfers' Society
: (which I am a current member of)  spend so much time investing in new
: equipment when they really should be getting regular lessons and simply
: practicing?

: While I realize tennis might be a clumsy analog, it's the only
: equipment-dependent sport I'm really good at.  Most of the people I grew
: up with stuck with inexpensive racquets for a few years.  Once they became
: competent, competitive players, they started buying "better" equipment.  
: I remember when the widebody racquet craze first hit, I encountered A LOT
: of players who could hit VERY hard and fast as a result, BUT STILL WEREN'T
: SIGNIFICANTLY BETTER.  Hard and fast means very little if you don't have a
: matchng set of skills.

: Golf seems even more suspect.  For every good player who buys an expensive
: driver and uses it to his or her advantage, there's a bad golfer who might
: add 10-15 yards to a drive, but who wouldn't shave any strokes off their
: game (10 yards farther means very little if it's in the rough or you can't
: hit a consistent iron anyway).  I invested in a $200 set of "Arnold Palmer
: Tour" clubs...11 standard clubs, stainless, cavity back, VERY simple and
: economical.  As of now, I'm not even using the driver, 3 iron and 4 iron,
: and rarely use the 6 or 8 iron.  This is because I am a beginner, but
: maybe other bad golfers (regardless of experience) should also think about
: ditching clubs that don't necessarily make a positive impact on their
: games.  As I get better, I'll expand the number of clubs I take to the
: course.

: While some people get really e***d about a new driver or new irons, I
: experience that same e***ment (IMHO) after a good lesson or a productive
: practice.  Although I realize that  I am opening myself up to criticism,
: I'm going to dole out some advice to you other bad golfers:  Forget about
: getting new, magical clubs that promise a better game.  Instead, take
: lessons, practice, and buy the clubs when you really NEED them.

: --
: Neelav Hajra
: Student, University of Michigan
: "no wonderfully inventive, exciting, and/or portentious quotes at this time"

    Very true, If the skill level isn't there, it doesn't matter a whole
lot what kind of club a person plays (my opinion anyway).

    On another tangent, why do some lower skilled players insist on
playing the blue tees when it is obviously something that is beyond their
ability to handle?  I play the blues on occasion depending on the course
and my recent play pattern, but I make sure to match my game to the tees
I choose.  I see it too often where people play the blues who can't make
some of the carries or other things.  Then, on some holes, some will wait in
the fairway till the green clears for a 250+ yard shot when their drive
only went 200 or so.  Don't get me wrong, I am not an elitist, just an
advocate for liberally applied common sense.