What I'm working on

What I'm working on

Post by Carbo » Wed, 20 Mar 2013 07:18:01


Quote:



>>> Finally, I aim center-right and utilize the release. The result is a
>>> beautiful draw and a lot more distance, without any significant
>>> effort. But then there's the other result An ugly ass hook. But I'll
>>> take a hook over a slice any day.

>> Slicers always say that. Personally I prefer a slice to a hook any day,
>> but I'm a ***. Hooks go a long way into the trees/OB. Slices not so
>> much. Slices carry. Hooks tend to drop out of the sky like s shot
>> quail.

> My course is a ***'s nightmare. 3 OB boundaries are on the left. None
> on the right. But...I think a push right slice is the worst, weakest,
> most worthless shot in golf. A close second is a dead pull. The sweetest
> is a draw and I'll risk a hook to have that shot.

I'll agree, if we're talking about a natural 5-yard draw and not something
that is the product of poor mechanics. The instructor I use believes that
once you clean up the typical swing flaws the ballflight will be a slight
draw due to the inside to square motion the clubhead takes into impact.
 
 
 

What I'm working on

Post by Alan Bake » Wed, 20 Mar 2013 07:27:19


Quote:


> Larry , You... your....you, Larry?

> You see what is wrong with this post to a general golf swing discussion?  You
> made it about me, the guy you stalk, instead of an intelligent and
> interesting OBJECTIVE post about the premise of the thread.

> You seem unable to understand what makes these forums interesting.  What you
> contribute ruins the threads.  It turns everyone off to see your hatred
> exposed.  Hence you have been banned everywhere, even the skiing forums and
> others.  I have seen posts indicating that people want to go and confront you
> near where you live!  That is how much people hate Alan Baker!  Wise up,
> moron!

> Larry  

I think I summed you up very fairly.

Greg is an actual 9 handicap, and YOU (the 18+) are telling him what it
is he needs to work on.

YOU are all about YOU, Larry.

YOU constantly want to show how only YOU are working on the right thing
and constantly ignore that YOU contradict YOURself about what that right
thing is on a regular basis.

All YOU really want is to somehow prove to YOURself that YOU are better
than EVERYONE ELSE.

How's that business of YOURS that YOU insisted was more than YOU running
it out of YOUR house, BTW?

www.delmardata.com.

Gone. Closed up shop.

Funny thing for a business that was supposedly so large to have just
disappeared overnight, huh?

It's almost as if it was precisely the one-man scanning operation I said
it was.

:-)

--
Alan Baker
Vancouver, British Columbia
"If you raise the ceiling four feet, move the fireplace from that wall
to that wall, you'll still only get the full stereophonic effect if you
sit in the bottom of that cupboard."

 
 
 

What I'm working on

Post by Dene » Wed, 20 Mar 2013 13:20:50


Quote:


> > The teaching pros I know will say that about 99.99% of the time when someone
> > walks up and wants to talk about "distance" or "release" he will say, "OK,
> > take your stance and let's see what you have." ?And 30 minutes later after
> > the pro has started the process of fixing a screwed up grip, a horrible
> > stance, and a takeaway that puts the golfer into a hopeless top position,
> > neither he nor the student brings up "distance" or "release" again. ?MOST
> > students have months of serious fundamental homework to do in order to
> > unlearn bad habits and ingrain correct positions and movements enabling them
> > to hit fairways--at any distance!

> > Larry

> You just can't stand the fact that some of us are working on things that
> are beyond your ability, can you, Larry?

> :-)

> --
> Alan Baker
> Vancouver, British Columbia
> "If you raise the ceiling four feet, move the fireplace from that wall
> to that wall, you'll still only get the full stereophonic effect if you
> sit in the bottom of that cupboard."

Actually Larry was correct. Release is an advance move and there are
other fundamentals that are preeminent. In my case, I have a good
setup, grip, and takeaway. I also hit the ball fairly well. I just
want more.

Greg

 
 
 

What I'm working on

Post by Alan Bake » Wed, 20 Mar 2013 13:28:10

In article

Quote:




> > > The teaching pros I know will say that about 99.99% of the time when
> > > someone
> > > walks up and wants to talk about "distance" or "release" he will say,
> > > "OK,
> > > take your stance and let's see what you have." ?And 30 minutes later
> > > after
> > > the pro has started the process of fixing a screwed up grip, a horrible
> > > stance, and a takeaway that puts the golfer into a hopeless top position,
> > > neither he nor the student brings up "distance" or "release" again. ?MOST
> > > students have months of serious fundamental homework to do in order to
> > > unlearn bad habits and ingrain correct positions and movements enabling
> > > them
> > > to hit fairways--at any distance!

> > > Larry

> > You just can't stand the fact that some of us are working on things that
> > are beyond your ability, can you, Larry?

> > :-)

> > --
> > Alan Baker
> > Vancouver, British Columbia
> > "If you raise the ceiling four feet, move the fireplace from that wall
> > to that wall, you'll still only get the full stereophonic effect if you
> > sit in the bottom of that cupboard."

> Actually Larry was correct. Release is an advance move and there are
> other fundamentals that are preeminent. In my case, I have a good
> setup, grip, and takeaway. I also hit the ball fairly well. I just
> want more.

And that's what I told him: that you have advanced to a point where
working on such a thing is relevant.

I told him that because he attempted to denigrate your efforts to learn
it by suggesting that you couldn't possibly be ready for anything so
advanced.

--
Alan Baker
Vancouver, British Columbia
"If you raise the ceiling four feet, move the fireplace from that wall
to that wall, you'll still only get the full stereophonic effect if you
sit in the bottom of that cupboard."

 
 
 

What I'm working on

Post by Dene » Wed, 20 Mar 2013 14:23:15


Quote:
> In article





> > > > The teaching pros I know will say that about 99.99% of the time when
> > > > someone
> > > > walks up and wants to talk about "distance" or "release" he will say,
> > > > "OK,
> > > > take your stance and let's see what you have." ?And 30 minutes later
> > > > after
> > > > the pro has started the process of fixing a screwed up grip, a horrible
> > > > stance, and a takeaway that puts the golfer into a hopeless top position,
> > > > neither he nor the student brings up "distance" or "release" again. ?MOST
> > > > students have months of serious fundamental homework to do in order to
> > > > unlearn bad habits and ingrain correct positions and movements enabling
> > > > them
> > > > to hit fairways--at any distance!

> > > > Larry

> > > You just can't stand the fact that some of us are working on things that
> > > are beyond your ability, can you, Larry?

> > > :-)

> > > --
> > > Alan Baker
> > > Vancouver, British Columbia
> > > "If you raise the ceiling four feet, move the fireplace from that wall
> > > to that wall, you'll still only get the full stereophonic effect if you
> > > sit in the bottom of that cupboard."

> > Actually Larry was correct. Release is an advance move and there are
> > other fundamentals that are preeminent. In my case, I have a good
> > setup, grip, and takeaway. I also hit the ball fairly well. I just
> > want more.

> And that's what I told him: that you have advanced to a point where
> working on such a thing is relevant.

> I told him that because he attempted to denigrate your efforts to learn
> it by suggesting that you couldn't possibly be ready for anything so
> advanced.

> --
> Alan Baker
> Vancouver, British Columbia
> "If you raise the ceiling four feet, move the fireplace from that wall
> to that wall, you'll still only get the full stereophonic effect if you
> sit in the bottom of that cupboard."

He wasn't denigrating me or anybody. He simply was contributing some
sound fundamentals.

Truth be told, it doesn't matter what he says. You promised to cease
stalking and you broke it...again.

 
 
 

What I'm working on

Post by Alan Bake » Wed, 20 Mar 2013 14:28:49

In article

Quote:


> > In article





> > > > > The teaching pros I know will say that about 99.99% of the time when
> > > > > someone
> > > > > walks up and wants to talk about "distance" or "release" he will say,
> > > > > "OK,
> > > > > take your stance and let's see what you have." ?And 30 minutes later
> > > > > after
> > > > > the pro has started the process of fixing a screwed up grip, a
> > > > > horrible
> > > > > stance, and a takeaway that puts the golfer into a hopeless top
> > > > > position,
> > > > > neither he nor the student brings up "distance" or "release" again.
> > > > > ?MOST
> > > > > students have months of serious fundamental homework to do in order
> > > > > to
> > > > > unlearn bad habits and ingrain correct positions and movements
> > > > > enabling
> > > > > them
> > > > > to hit fairways--at any distance!

> > > > > Larry

> > > > You just can't stand the fact that some of us are working on things
> > > > that
> > > > are beyond your ability, can you, Larry?

> > > > :-)

> > > > --
> > > > Alan Baker
> > > > Vancouver, British Columbia
> > > > "If you raise the ceiling four feet, move the fireplace from that wall
> > > > to that wall, you'll still only get the full stereophonic effect if you
> > > > sit in the bottom of that cupboard."

> > > Actually Larry was correct. Release is an advance move and there are
> > > other fundamentals that are preeminent. In my case, I have a good
> > > setup, grip, and takeaway. I also hit the ball fairly well. I just
> > > want more.

> > And that's what I told him: that you have advanced to a point where
> > working on such a thing is relevant.

> > I told him that because he attempted to denigrate your efforts to learn
> > it by suggesting that you couldn't possibly be ready for anything so
> > advanced.

> > --
> > Alan Baker
> > Vancouver, British Columbia
> > "If you raise the ceiling four feet, move the fireplace from that wall
> > to that wall, you'll still only get the full stereophonic effect if you
> > sit in the bottom of that cupboard."

> He wasn't denigrating me or anybody. He simply was contributing some
> sound fundamentals.

I love the fact that you'll ignore reality because I'm the one who's
stated it.

:-)

Quote:

> Truth be told, it doesn't matter what he says. You promised to cease
> stalking and you broke it...again.

Since I never--ever--promised to cease doing something I've
never--ever--done, I don't see how I could have broken it.

:-)

--
Alan Baker
Vancouver, British Columbia
"If you raise the ceiling four feet, move the fireplace from that wall
to that wall, you'll still only get the full stereophonic effect if you
sit in the bottom of that cupboard."

 
 
 

What I'm working on

Post by Silvi » Wed, 20 Mar 2013 19:06:27


Quote:




>>>>> Through a series of lessons and some helpful viddy's from rotary

>>>>> swing.com, I'm trying to incorporate what has always been missing from

>>>>> my swing...the proper release of the club head. It's difficult but

>>>>> necessary at my age and ability. If I don't incorporate it now, I'm

>>>>> going to lose power as I lose flexibility.

>>>>> Basically, my range practice goes like this. I take five balls and aim

>>>>> for rightfield. I then aim straight and incorporate the release, with

>>>>> a full intention of hooking every ball into the left-field net.

>>>>> Finally, I aim center-right and utilize the release. The result is a

>>>>> beautiful draw and a lot more distance, without any significant

>>>>> effort. But then there's the other result An ugly ass hook. But I'll

>>>>> take a hook over a slice any day.

>>>>> Greg

>>>> What do you mean by incorporating the release? If you mean rolling the

>>>> wrists intentionally then you are setting yourself up for duck-hook

>>>> trouble. The rolling of the wrists should be a result of the release,

>>>> not the cause.

>>>> A proper release happens automatically and at the right moment as a

>>>> result of a proper swing sequence. There is no need to deliberately

>>>> delay or execute it.

>>>> Any deliberate action to to let the club release will prove almost

>>>> impossible to time consistently.

>>> Good post. Many golfer naturally turn or roll their left wrist through

>>> impact. I don't. Instead I cast early and then block with a pronounced

>>> chicken wing on the follow through. I'm a 9 GHIN so I've managed to

>>> make it work, but the time is nigh to take my swing to the next level.

>>> I,m fortunate to play with a few nearly scratch player. One

>>> distinction between their swing and mine is the release.

>>> -Greg

>> Sounds like you have a good grasp of your swing. Playing with such good

>> golfers will do that for you

>> Both the cast and chicken wing are sure release killers. Perhaps you

>> should concentrate on that and the release will follow naturally.

>> Silvio

> The teaching pros I know will say that about 99.99% of the time when someone walks up and wants to talk about "distance" or "release" he will say, "OK, take your stance and let's see what you have."  And 30 minutes later after the pro has started the process of fixing a screwed up grip, a horrible stance, and a takeaway that puts the golfer into a hopeless top position, neither he nor the student brings up "distance" or "release" again.  MOST students have months of serious fundamental homework to do in order to unlearn bad habits and ingrain correct positions and movements enabling them to hit fairways--at any distance!

> Larry

I am not a pro but the cast and the chicken wing are things I see
frequently with golfers who have too little upper body rotation. They
usually compensate for this with sideways arm movement.

Sometimes the golfer in questions has limited capability of rotating his
body but mostly they are just too focused on their aim at the ball and
are reluctant to turn their body away from it.

 
 
 

What I'm working on

Post by Dene » Thu, 21 Mar 2013 00:37:37


Quote:





> >>>>> Through a series of lessons and some helpful viddy's from rotary

> >>>>> swing.com, I'm trying to incorporate what has always been missing from

> >>>>> my swing...the proper release of the club head. It's difficult but

> >>>>> necessary at my age and ability. If I don't incorporate it now, I'm

> >>>>> going to lose power as I lose flexibility.

> >>>>> Basically, my range practice goes like this. I take five balls and aim

> >>>>> for rightfield. I then aim straight and incorporate the release, with

> >>>>> a full intention of hooking every ball into the left-field net.

> >>>>> Finally, I aim center-right and utilize the release. The result is a

> >>>>> beautiful draw and a lot more distance, without any significant

> >>>>> effort. But then there's the other result An ugly ass hook. But I'll

> >>>>> take a hook over a slice any day.

> >>>>> Greg

> >>>> What do you mean by incorporating the release? If you mean rolling the

> >>>> wrists intentionally then you are setting yourself up for duck-hook

> >>>> trouble. The rolling of the wrists should be a result of the release,

> >>>> not the cause.

> >>>> A proper release happens automatically and at the right moment as a

> >>>> result of a proper swing sequence. There is no need to deliberately

> >>>> delay or execute it.

> >>>> Any deliberate action to to let the club release will prove almost

> >>>> impossible to time consistently.

> >>> Good post. Many golfer naturally turn or roll their left wrist through

> >>> impact. I don't. Instead I cast early and then block with a pronounced

> >>> chicken wing on the follow through. I'm a 9 GHIN so I've managed to

> >>> make it work, but the time is nigh to take my swing to the next level.

> >>> I,m fortunate to play with a few nearly scratch player. One

> >>> distinction between their swing and mine is the release.

> >>> -Greg

> >> Sounds like you have a good grasp of your swing. Playing with such good

> >> golfers will do that for you

> >> Both the cast and chicken wing are sure release killers. Perhaps you

> >> should concentrate on that and the release will follow naturally.

> >> Silvio

> > The teaching pros I know will say that about 99.99% of the time when someone walks up and wants to talk about "distance" or "release" he will say, "OK, take your stance and let's see what you have." ?And 30 minutes later after the pro has started the process of fixing a screwed up grip, a horrible stance, and a takeaway that puts the golfer into a hopeless top position, neither he nor the student brings up "distance" or "release" again. ?MOST students have months of serious fundamental homework to do in order to unlearn bad habits and ingrain correct positions and movements enabling them to hit fairways--at any distance!

> > Larry

> I am not a pro but the cast and the chicken wing are things I see
> frequently with golfers who have too little upper body rotation. They
> usually compensate for this with sideways arm movement.

> Sometimes the golfer in questions has limited capability of rotating his
> body but mostly they are just too focused on their aim at the ball and
> are reluctant to turn their body away from it.

Mine comes from trying to block a dead pull. It's a result of
releasing/casting at the top and coming in to steep.

-Greg

 
 
 

What I'm working on

Post by Dene » Thu, 21 Mar 2013 11:08:55

Learned something else which may be helpful to some. Notice a typical
pro, at the top of his backswing when the club is parallel to the
ground, the shaft drops a bit before he starts the downswing. Why?
Because he softens his hands which prevents a cast. The hands go for
the ride as he starts to uncoil. Try it. Take the club to parallel,
then soften. You'll notice faster speed at the bottom in correlation
to a better ability to maintain the angle/lag during the downswing.
It's one reason why lady pros can out drive most stronger male
amateurs.

Greg

 
 
 

What I'm working on

Post by Alan Bake » Thu, 21 Mar 2013 11:20:18

In article

Quote:

> Learned something else which may be helpful to some. Notice a typical
> pro, at the top of his backswing when the club is parallel to the
> ground, the shaft drops a bit before he starts the downswing. Why?
> Because he softens his hands which prevents a cast. The hands go for
> the ride as he starts to uncoil. Try it. Take the club to parallel,
> then soften. You'll notice faster speed at the bottom in correlation
> to a better ability to maintain the angle/lag during the downswing.
> It's one reason why lady pros can out drive most stronger male
> amateurs.

> Greg

Good thought.

I think you'll find it is also because a pro starts the actual forward
movement of the downswing BEFORE he has come to a complete stop all
together.

I think it's also a good reason for NOT completing your wrist set early.
If you leave your wrist set until later, the angle will still be closing
as you get to the top; as least you can time it that way.

--
Alan Baker
Vancouver, British Columbia
"If you raise the ceiling four feet, move the fireplace from that wall
to that wall, you'll still only get the full stereophonic effect if you
sit in the bottom of that cupboard."

 
 
 

What I'm working on

Post by Frank Ketchu » Thu, 21 Mar 2013 12:09:10


Through a series of lessons and some helpful viddy's from rotary
swing.com, I'm trying to incorporate what has always been missing from
my swing...the proper release of the club head. It's difficult but
necessary at my age and ability. If I don't incorporate it now, I'm
going to lose power as I lose flexibility.

Basically, my range practice goes like this. I take five balls and aim
for rightfield. I then aim straight and incorporate the release, with
a full intention of hooking every ball into the left-field net.

Finally, I aim center-right and utilize the release. The result is a
beautiful draw and a lot more distance, without any significant
effort. But then there's the other result An ugly ass hook. But I'll
take a hook over a slice any day.

- - -

Yeah, I learned to release the clubhead a long time ago.  Played well for
many years with a nice draw, then it turned into a hook.  What is that
saying about a hook not listening?  It's true.
Tread carefully.

I've since decided I needed to play a fade.  So I've been working for the
last couple years on a reliable fade which is coming along.  Basically it
either goes straight or fades a little.  Trust me, golf is much easier
playing straight / fade instead of draw / hook.
Tread carefully.

 
 
 

What I'm working on

Post by Frank Ketchu » Thu, 21 Mar 2013 12:23:49



Quote:

> <snip>

> > Finally, I aim center-right and utilize the release. The result is a
> > beautiful draw and a lot more distance, without any significant
> > effort. But then there's the other result An ugly ass hook. But I'll
> > take a hook over a slice any day.

> Slicers always say that. Personally I prefer a slice to a hook any day,
> but I'm a ***. Hooks go a long way into the trees/OB. Slices not so
> much. Slices carry. Hooks tend to drop out of the sky like s shot quail.

My course is a ***'s nightmare. 3 OB boundaries are on the left.
None on the right. But...I think a push right slice is the worst,
weakest, most worthless shot in golf. A close second is a dead pull.
The sweetest is a draw and I'll risk a hook to have that shot.

- - -

As I said in my other post, be careful.  A pull hook is no damn picnic,
trust me.  A push slice stops but a pull hook rolls and rolls and rolls.
Strive for (essentially) straight.  If it requires you to teach yourself to
draw then fine but more or less straight is where you want to be.

My issue that was causing my hooks was that I was getting stuck behind the
ball.  Most amateurs don't fire their hips enough or early enough.  I have
the opposite problem, I naturally fire the hips too early and too hard and I
struggle to get the hands caught up and square the clubhead.  Therefore my
shot was far to dependent on wrist action and hand eye coordination.  This
has been tough to un-teach myself but I've made lots of progress.  Tiger
also had this problem early in his career (our similarities end there).