The Ups and Downs of Life as Tiger (controversial)

The Ups and Downs of Life as Tiger (controversial)

Post by David Goldstei » Wed, 10 Mar 2004 20:19:18


  This is the subject of an article on the CNN website and after reading it,
instead of feeling sympathy for Woods, it just pissed me off.  Why are we
supposed to feel sorry for people who make tons of money doing something
that in reality is not very important in the grand scheme of helping human
civilization advance?

  "Like certain royals and a few movie stars, world number one Woods has to
contend with the ever-present flashbulbs, jostling crowds and persistent
autograph hunters."  Big deal.  If that is all that these people have to
worry about in life, I sure am not feeling sorry for them.

  The article claims that amateur golfers would not want to trade places
with Woods.  Sorry, I just don't see it.  Which is worse?  Not knowing how
you are going to meet your monthly obligations, or having someone ask for an
aoutgraph?  For me, the answer is clear.

  The article goes on to say how Woods has to perform clinics and do some
glad-handing with sponsors--who pay huge amounts of money to have him at
their tournaments.  Sorry, but that is what he is getting paid for when he
accepts the sponsorship money.  If he does not like it--or any of the other
athletes and celebrities who face this "dilemma"--don't like it, there is an
elegant solution:  do not accept sponsor's money!  Really difficult to solve
that problem, now, wasn't it?  Sponsorship money is not a gift, but a
paycheck.  If you do not want the job, give it to someone else.

  Woods got to ride in a military jet, got paid three million dollars just
for showing up in Dubai, blasted golf balls from a helipad 1000 feet in the
air, stayed in the royal suite at the seven (*******) star hotel  (did it
cost anything? Nope) and arrived in his private jet.  Geez, what a tough
life that must be.

  If sacrificing privacy, doing autograph sessions, doing a few golf clinics
and shaking hands is too much for the young man--and all of the other
extremely overpaid entertainers, athletes--then let them step aside and make
room for those who handle these "difficulties" with class.

  The real sacrifice is being made by the poor and middle class who fight
for their existence, by soldiers who get sent to far away places to die, in
order to protect the portfolios of the rich, by police who risk their lives
everyday and get paid squat, by teachers who struggle to make learning a
constructive experience while having the budget for the school systems get
slashed, etc....

  If all of this is too much, then I will gladly accept the three million
dollar check on behalf of Woods and sign autographs for him, and let people
take my picture.  I will hobnob with the royality, and heads of state, as
well.  Woods, et al, you all need to take a step back and look at the big
picture and stop your whining.  The people that are really sacrificing and
struggling are getting a slap in the face everytime we hear complaints about
how hard your lives are.

David

 
 
 

The Ups and Downs of Life as Tiger (controversial)

Post by Bill » Wed, 10 Mar 2004 21:23:17

I read the article and amazed at your interpretation that Tiger is whining
and moaning...Seems like the writer was more flabbergasted than Woods.

Bill


Quote:
>   This is the subject of an article on the CNN website and after reading
it,
> instead of feeling sympathy for Woods, it just pissed me off.  Why are we
> supposed to feel sorry for people who make tons of money doing something
> that in reality is not very important in the grand scheme of helping human
> civilization advance?

>   "Like certain royals and a few movie stars, world number one Woods has
to
> contend with the ever-present flashbulbs, jostling crowds and persistent
> autograph hunters."  Big deal.  If that is all that these people have to
> worry about in life, I sure am not feeling sorry for them.

>   The article claims that amateur golfers would not want to trade places
> with Woods.  Sorry, I just don't see it.  Which is worse?  Not knowing how
> you are going to meet your monthly obligations, or having someone ask for
an
> aoutgraph?  For me, the answer is clear.

>   The article goes on to say how Woods has to perform clinics and do some
> glad-handing with sponsors--who pay huge amounts of money to have him at
> their tournaments.  Sorry, but that is what he is getting paid for when he
> accepts the sponsorship money.  If he does not like it--or any of the
other
> athletes and celebrities who face this "dilemma"--don't like it, there is
an
> elegant solution:  do not accept sponsor's money!  Really difficult to
solve
> that problem, now, wasn't it?  Sponsorship money is not a gift, but a
> paycheck.  If you do not want the job, give it to someone else.

>   Woods got to ride in a military jet, got paid three million dollars just
> for showing up in Dubai, blasted golf balls from a helipad 1000 feet in
the
> air, stayed in the royal suite at the seven (*******) star hotel  (did it
> cost anything? Nope) and arrived in his private jet.  Geez, what a tough
> life that must be.

>   If sacrificing privacy, doing autograph sessions, doing a few golf
clinics
> and shaking hands is too much for the young man--and all of the other
> extremely overpaid entertainers, athletes--then let them step aside and
make
> room for those who handle these "difficulties" with class.

>   The real sacrifice is being made by the poor and middle class who fight
> for their existence, by soldiers who get sent to far away places to die,
in
> order to protect the portfolios of the rich, by police who risk their
lives
> everyday and get paid squat, by teachers who struggle to make learning a
> constructive experience while having the budget for the school systems get
> slashed, etc....

>   If all of this is too much, then I will gladly accept the three million
> dollar check on behalf of Woods and sign autographs for him, and let
people
> take my picture.  I will hobnob with the royality, and heads of state, as
> well.  Woods, et al, you all need to take a step back and look at the big
> picture and stop your whining.  The people that are really sacrificing and
> struggling are getting a slap in the face everytime we hear complaints
about
> how hard your lives are.

> David


 
 
 

The Ups and Downs of Life as Tiger (controversial)

Post by Dave » Wed, 10 Mar 2004 21:49:34

On Tue, 9 Mar 2004 12:19:18 +0100, "David Goldstein"

Quote:

>  This is the subject of an article on the CNN website and after reading it,
>instead of feeling sympathy for Woods, it just pissed me off.

If you're going to trash an article, give the URL so we can
see whether your head is up your ass.
http://SportToday.org/

Quote:
> Why are we
>supposed to feel sorry for people who make tons of money doing something
>that in reality is not very important in the grand scheme of helping human
>civilization advance?

You're not.  The word "sorry" doesn't appear in the article.
You have your head up your ass.

Quote:
>  "Like certain royals and a few movie stars, world number one Woods has to
>contend with the ever-present flashbulbs, jostling crowds and persistent
>autograph hunters."  Big deal.  If that is all that these people have to
>worry about in life, I sure am not feeling sorry for them.

Nobody said you should, and nobody gives a rat's ass whether
you do.

Quote:
>  The article claims that amateur golfers would not want to trade places
>with Woods.  Sorry, I just don't see it.  Which is worse?  Not knowing how
>you are going to meet your monthly obligations, or having someone ask for an
>aoutgraph?  For me, the answer is clear.

The author claims that *most* amateur golfers wouldn't trade
with him.  I think he's probably wrong, and I doubt he did a
survey, so it's probably just his opinion.  But he sure
didn't say that people below the poverty line wouldn't trade
with him, as your straw man implies.

Quote:
>  The article goes on to say how Woods has to perform clinics and do some
>glad-handing with sponsors--who pay huge amounts of money to have him at
>their tournaments.  Sorry, but that is what he is getting paid for when he
>accepts the sponsorship money.  If he does not like it--or any of the other
>athletes and celebrities who face this "dilemma"--don't like it, there is an
>elegant solution:  do not accept sponsor's money!  Really difficult to solve
>that problem, now, wasn't it?  Sponsorship money is not a gift, but a
>paycheck.  If you do not want the job, give it to someone else.

You have your head up your ass.  There is only one quote
from Tiger about this aspect of his life, when he says that
he wishes he could have both the success he has won and his
former anonymity, but he realizes he can't have both.  There
is not a hint of complaint, nor that he considers giving
clinics a burden, nor that he faces a dilemma about whether
to turn down the offers he gets (and he probably gets 50 for
each one he accepts).  He didn't say it, but the obvious
implication is that he would just like to be able to go
outside his house without a cadre of security guards.

Quote:
>  Woods got to ride in a military jet, got paid three million dollars just
>for showing up in Dubai, blasted golf balls from a helipad 1000 feet in the
>air, stayed in the royal suite at the seven (*******) star hotel  (did it
>cost anything? Nope) and arrived in his private jet.  Geez, what a tough
>life that must be.

You have your head up your ass.  He didn't complain about
any of that.  On the contrary, he said visiting the troops
on the aircraft carrier was awe-inspiring. As long as you're
pretending he hates everything he likes, why don't you
include his Swedish fiancee among the list of his alleged
complaints?

Quote:
>  If sacrificing privacy, doing autograph sessions, doing a few golf clinics
>and shaking hands is too much for the young man--and all of the other
>extremely overpaid entertainers, athletes--then let them step aside and make
>room for those who handle these "difficulties" with class.

Like you, for instance?  I wonder how much class you would
have if total strangers read what some reporter had written
about you, and then completely misconstrued it to make you
look like a whiny ***?  A very short trip, in your case.

Quote:
>  The real sacrifice is being made by the poor and middle class who fight
>for their existence, by soldiers who get sent to far away places to die, in
>order to protect the portfolios of the rich, by police who risk their lives
>everyday and get paid squat, by teachers who struggle to make learning a
>constructive experience while having the budget for the school systems get
>slashed, etc....

And if Tiger shot himself in the head, all of that would go
away, right?  The other major quote from Tiger was precisely
that he appreciated the sacrifice our soldiers were making.
I guess you didn't read that part.  I guess you also are
unaware that he puts more time and money into charities than
you could ever dream about.

Quote:
>  If all of this is too much, then I will gladly accept the three million
>dollar check on behalf of Woods and sign autographs for him, and let people
>take my picture.  I will hobnob with the royality, and heads of state, as
>well.

Gee, what a shock.  Here I thought you were a wise
philospher, but it turns out you're just jealous.  For some
reason, you forgot to say how you would end poverty and war,
like you expect Tiger to do.

Quote:
>  Woods, et al, you all need to take a step back and look at the big
>picture and stop your whining.  The people that are really sacrificing and
>struggling are getting a slap in the face everytime we hear complaints about
>how hard your lives are.

You need to take a step back, look in the mirror, and see
who the pitiful sour-grapes whiner really is.

 
 
 

The Ups and Downs of Life as Tiger (controversial)

Post by Chri » Wed, 10 Mar 2004 22:33:25

You have your head up your ass.

Well said Dave...I think that sums it up pretty well!

Chris

 
 
 

The Ups and Downs of Life as Tiger (controversial)

Post by Miss Anne Thro » Wed, 10 Mar 2004 22:35:57

Finally, someone understands what I've been trying to say.  Welcome to
the ranks of the lucid, Dave.
 
 
 

The Ups and Downs of Life as Tiger (controversial)

Post by Tim » Wed, 10 Mar 2004 23:16:42

Quote:

>   This is the subject of an article on the CNN website and after reading it,
> instead of feeling sympathy for Woods, it just pissed me off.  Why are we
> supposed to feel sorry for people who make tons of money doing something
> that in reality is not very important in the grand scheme of helping human
> civilization advance?

First of all, if everybody played golf instead of engaging in religious
stupidity and fighting senseless wars, humans might be worthy of calling
our exsistence "civilization".

Quote:

>   "Like certain royals and a few movie stars, world number one Woods has to
> contend with the ever-present flashbulbs, jostling crowds and persistent
> autograph hunters."  Big deal.  If that is all that these people have to
> worry about in life, I sure am not feeling sorry for them.

I don't feel sorry for him at all.  He has a very fortunate life and
knows it, and has busted his ass to get to where he is.

Quote:

>   The article claims that amateur golfers would not want to trade places
> with Woods.  Sorry, I just don't see it.  Which is worse?  Not knowing how
> you are going to meet your monthly obligations, or having someone ask for an
> aoutgraph?  For me, the answer is clear.

>   The article goes on to say how Woods has to perform clinics and do some
> glad-handing with sponsors--who pay huge amounts of money to have him at
> their tournaments.  Sorry, but that is what he is getting paid for when he
> accepts the sponsorship money.  If he does not like it--or any of the other
> athletes and celebrities who face this "dilemma"--don't like it, there is an
> elegant solution:  do not accept sponsor's money!  Really difficult to solve
> that problem, now, wasn't it?  Sponsorship money is not a gift, but a
> paycheck.  If you do not want the job, give it to someone else.

>   Woods got to ride in a military jet, got paid three million dollars just
> for showing up in Dubai, blasted golf balls from a helipad 1000 feet in the
> air, stayed in the royal suite at the seven (*******) star hotel  (did it
> cost anything? Nope) and arrived in his private jet.  Geez, what a tough
> life that must be.

>   If sacrificing privacy, doing autograph sessions, doing a few golf clinics
> and shaking hands is too much for the young man--and all of the other
> extremely overpaid entertainers, athletes--then let them step aside and make
> room for those who handle these "difficulties" with class.

>   The real sacrifice is being made by the poor and middle class who fight
> for their existence, by soldiers who get sent to far away places to die, in
> order to protect the portfolios of the rich, by police who risk their lives
> everyday and get paid squat, by teachers who struggle to make learning a
> constructive experience while having the budget for the school systems get
> slashed, etc....

>   If all of this is too much, then I will gladly accept the three million
> dollar check on behalf of Woods and sign autographs for him, and let people
> take my picture.  I will hobnob with the royality, and heads of state, as
> well.  Woods, et al, you all need to take a step back and look at the big
> picture and stop your whining.  The people that are really sacrificing and
> struggling are getting a slap in the face everytime we hear complaints about
> how hard your lives are.

> David

Nobody wants your autograph.

They probably didn't even interview Tiger about any of this.  Therefore
it's a lot of speculation.

tim

 
 
 

The Ups and Downs of Life as Tiger (controversial)

Post by Bill » Wed, 10 Mar 2004 23:20:03

Quote:
> Nobody wants your autograph.

> They probably didn't even interview Tiger about any of this.  Therefore
> it's a lot of speculation.

> tim

The funny thing about the original posters diatribe is I saw Tiger on TGC a
few minutes ago talking about his visit on the carrier with the troops, and
he was as e***d as Tiger can get. He sure didnt seem to be having any
problems dealing with this. The writer of that article sure made some
ridiculous assumptions and conclusions, and like you said he probably didnt
interview Tiger.

Bill

 
 
 

The Ups and Downs of Life as Tiger (controversial)

Post by Brian Hoyl » Wed, 10 Mar 2004 23:39:48

Perspective is everything. You might have all the money/fame/perks/luxury in the
world, but life can still feel cramped, constrained and uncomfortable.

You can't know how he might feel. Sounds maybe like you are jealous? Tiger is a
product of our need to elevate people to mythic status. Once they are on the
pedestal, we do our best to shove it out from under them.

If it was me, with cameras always in my face and people like me posting to
newsgroups to comment on the minutia of my life, I'd feel bad, even with
gazillions in the bank. He's a human like us all. Money/fame/etc does not
guarantee contentment. So enough bashing.

Just my paltry $0.02 worth,
Brian

<snip>

 
 
 

The Ups and Downs of Life as Tiger (controversial)

Post by Howard Braze » Thu, 11 Mar 2004 00:13:42


Quote:
> You can't know how he might feel. Sounds maybe like you are jealous? Tiger is
> a
> product of our need to elevate people to mythic status. Once they are on the
> pedestal, we do our best to shove it out from under them.

> If it was me, with cameras always in my face and people like me posting to
> newsgroups to comment on the minutia of my life, I'd feel bad, even with
> gazillions in the bank. He's a human like us all. Money/fame/etc does not
> guarantee contentment. So enough bashing.

I would love to have his success - and I would dislike not being able to turn on
anonymity on demand.   It think autograph hounding is disgusting, but would
believe that it was part of my job to pander to them if I were Tiger.   That
doesn't mean I would enjoy it.   I would enjoy being recognized much of the
time, but not all of the time.    He can afford to go to the best restaurants as
often as he wants - but he can't go and have a quiet date with his fiance at
them.

The other day Michael Jackson was stopped by security guards.   He went to a
Wall*Mart near Glenwood Springs wearing a ski mask.   Sure it was ski country,
but retailers don't want people to hide their faces.  (and Jackson doesn't
always want to be mobbed by shoppers).

I'd trade places with Tiger if I didn't have to give up my family.   I wouldn't
trade places with Michael.

But nothing is without cost.

 
 
 

The Ups and Downs of Life as Tiger (controversial)

Post by Laura Bush murdered her boy frie » Thu, 11 Mar 2004 01:44:01

Quote:

> This is the subject of an article on the CNN website and after reading it,
> instead of feeling sympathy for Woods, it just pissed me off.  Why are we
> supposed to feel sorry for people who make tons of money doing something
> that in reality is not very important in the grand scheme of helping human
> civilization advance?

That's america.  You're judged by your wealth.  As far as doing good
for society, a truckdriver is much more valuable than a pro golfer.
 
 
 

The Ups and Downs of Life as Tiger (controversial)

Post by MACA » Thu, 11 Mar 2004 01:45:21

I totally agree with you!

Jerry

--
MACANS Golf Scorecard
http://golf.macans.com

Quote:

> This is the subject of an article on the CNN website and after reading it,
> instead of feeling sympathy for Woods, it just pissed me off.  Why are we
> supposed to feel sorry for people who make tons of money doing something
> that in reality is not very important in the grand scheme of helping human
> civilization advance?

>   "Like certain royals and a few movie stars, world number one Woods has to
> contend with the ever-present flashbulbs, jostling crowds and persistent
> autograph hunters."  Big deal.  If that is all that these people have to
> worry about in life, I sure am not feeling sorry for them.

>   The article claims that amateur golfers would not want to trade places
> with Woods.  Sorry, I just don't see it.  Which is worse?  Not knowing how
> you are going to meet your monthly obligations, or having someone ask for an
> aoutgraph?  For me, the answer is clear.

>   The article goes on to say how Woods has to perform clinics and do some
> glad-handing with sponsors--who pay huge amounts of money to have him at
> their tournaments.  Sorry, but that is what he is getting paid for when he
> accepts the sponsorship money.  If he does not like it--or any of the other
> athletes and celebrities who face this "dilemma"--don't like it, there is an
> elega

nt solution:  do not accept sponsor's money!  Really difficult to solve

- Show quoted text -

Quote:
> that problem, now, wasn't it?  Sponsorship money is not a gift, but a
> paycheck.  If you do not want the job, give it to someone else.

>   Woods got to ride in a military jet, got paid three million dollars just
> for showing up in Dubai, blasted golf balls from a helipad 1000 feet in the
> air, stayed in the royal suite at the seven (*******) star hotel  (did it
> cost anything? Nope) and arrived in his private jet.  Geez, what a tough
> life that must be.

>   If sacrificing privacy, doing autograph sessions, doing a few golf clinics
> and shaking hands is too much for the young man--and all of the other
> extremely overpaid entertainers, athletes--then let them step aside and make
> room for those who handle these "difficulties" with class.

>   The real sacrifice is being made by the poor and middle class who fight
> for their existence, by soldiers who get sent to far away places to die, in
> order to protect the portfolios of the rich, by police who risk their lives
> everyday and get paid squat, by teachers who struggle to make learning a
> constructive experience while having the budget for the school systems get
> slashed, etc....

>   If all of this is too much, then I will gladly accept the three million
> dollar check on behalf of Woods and sign autographs for him, and let people
> take my picture.  I will hobnob with the royality, and heads of state, as
> well.  Woods, et al, you all need to take a step back and look at the big
> picture and stop your whining.  The people that are really sacrificing and
> struggling are getting a slap in the face everytime we hear complaints about
> how hard your lives are.

> David

 
 
 

The Ups and Downs of Life as Tiger (controversial)

Post by Bobby Knigh » Thu, 11 Mar 2004 01:46:07


Quote:


> > This is the subject of an article on the CNN website and after reading it,
> > instead of feeling sympathy for Woods, it just pissed me off.  Why are we
> > supposed to feel sorry for people who make tons of money doing something
> > that in reality is not very important in the grand scheme of helping human
> > civilization advance?

> That's america.  You're judged by your wealth.  As far as doing good
> for society, a truckdriver is much more valuable than a pro golfer.

And what do you do for the good of society in America?  (Note
capitalization).
bk
 
 
 

The Ups and Downs of Life as Tiger (controversial)

Post by m » Thu, 11 Mar 2004 01:54:44

Quote:

> This is the subject of an article on the CNN website and after reading it,
> instead of feeling sympathy for Woods, it just pissed me off.  Why are we
> supposed to feel sorry for people who make tons of money doing something
> that in reality is not very important in the grand scheme of helping human
> civilization advance?

>   "Like certain royals and a few movie stars, world number one Woods has to
> contend with the ever-present flashbulbs, jostling crowds and persistent
> autograph hunters."  Big deal.  If that is all that these people have to
> worry about in life, I sure am not feeling sorry for them.

>   The article claims that amateur golfers would not want to trade places
> with Woods.  Sorry, I just don't see it.  Which is worse?  Not knowing how
> you are going to meet your monthly obligations, or having someone ask for an
> aoutgraph?  For me, the answer is clear.

>   The article goes on to say how Woods has to perform clinics and do some
> glad-handing with sponsors--who pay huge amounts of money to have him at
> their tournaments.  Sorry, but that is what he is getting paid for when he
> accepts the sponsorship money.  If he does not like it--or any of the other
> athletes and celebrities who face this "dilemma"--don't like it, there is an
> elegant solution:  do not accept sponsor's money!  Really difficult to solve
> that problem, now, wasn't it?  Sponsorship money is not a gift, but a
> paycheck.  If you do not want the job, give it to someone else.
[snip]
>   If all of this is too much, then I will gladly accept the three million
> dollar check on behalf of Woods and sign autographs for him, and let people
> take my picture.  I will hobnob with the royality, and heads of state, as
> well.  Woods, et al, you all need to take a step back and look at the big
> picture and stop your whining.  The people that are really sacrificing and
> struggling are getting a slap in the face everytime we hear complaints about
> how hard your lives are.

   I understand your point of view,  but I do want to point out that
it is mostly a case of a very poorly written article.  Tiger himself
isn't particularly complaining, and acknowledges that there are trade
offs in life and these are the ones he's chosen.  Over all he seems
to be happy with the trade, and much of the article is about the ups
not downs.  

   There is a "grass is always greener" attempt in this article.  They
attempt to explain the burdens on a guy who is "intensely private".
However, as you suggest, the original assertions about folks "not
wanting to trade places" with Tiger seemed a bit over the top.
We all tend to like to complain about our jobs once and a bit.  I'm
fond of saying during a tough round on the course; "...a bad day
and the golf course beats a good day at work".  But it's all mostly
just in fun.  I keep an old momento of the days when I worked in
a factory and there is no comparison.  I watch guys putting hot
tar on roofs in July, or digging in ditches by the side of the
road, and I'm glad I'm in my aircondition car on the way to my
airconditioned office.  

   Put Tiger in my life for a day, and he goes screaming back to
his in a minute.  Put me in Tigers, and I never give it back.

 
 
 

The Ups and Downs of Life as Tiger (controversial)

Post by John Hil » Thu, 11 Mar 2004 02:18:19


Quote:
>   This is the subject of an article on the CNN website and after reading
it,
> instead of feeling sympathy for Woods, it just pissed me off.  Why are we

Snip..

Quote:
> picture and stop your whining.  The people that are really sacrificing and
> struggling are getting a slap in the face everytime we hear complaints
about
> how hard your lives are.

> David

One day I was in the middle of a project, impossible deadline, millions of
dollars on the line, and every action (or inaction) on my part was
scrutinized and debated in a public forum.  In the midst of this, I found
myself staring out of a window at a guy plowing a field across from my
(then) office building.  A peer of mine came up and asked, "What do you find
so fascinating about a guy plowing a field?"  Of course my reaction at that
time was envy.  I so wanted to give up my paycheck, my quality of life, just
to not have all the BS around me; to have only one responsibility, to plow a
tract of land; to be that guy sitting on his ***on a tractor and driving
north, then south, then north, etc.

But of course I didn't, because no matter where you are in life there are
stresses to deal with.  And until you experience them, you can't really know
how bad it truly is.  You see, if I did give up everything to plow a field I
would have given up all that stress of worrying about my actions, the
politics, the budget, the livelihood of a (then) Fortune 1000 company.  But
I would have taken on the stress of having a limited paycheck, limited
available resources, dependence on the US government for my retirement, etc.

You believe that public scrutiny is "something you can deal with easily".
Try it out for a bit, I think you'll find that being able to speak your mind
is a nice freedom to have.  Better yet, have someone threaten your job for
not including one name in a single sentence spoken at lunch.  That's always
fun.

You believe that being wealthy is "something you can deal with easily".  Try
it out for a bit, I think you'll find that seeing your friends and family
fight with you over your money is not a bunch of fun and creates enemies of
the people you hold closest to your heart.

You believe that doing charity work is "something you can deal with easily".
Try it out for a bit, I think you'll find that seeing a child who will never
see the age of seven is something you won't want to do very often.  You may
be able to walk away, but you leave something behind.

No matter what class/status/wealth/etc you believe you want to be a part of,
you'll find that you only trade one set of stresses for another.  Been
there, done that, and it's a hard lesson to learn.

 
 
 

The Ups and Downs of Life as Tiger (controversial)

Post by Howard Braze » Thu, 11 Mar 2004 02:32:37


Quote:
> That's america.  You're judged by your wealth.  As far as doing good
> for society, a truckdriver is much more valuable than a pro golfer.

How do you measure "good"?    Does putting a bunch of Twinkies in a Wal*Mart do
more good or less good than getting people to walk a golf course to watch PGA
players play?

In America people vote about what they like with their $.   I suppose we could
have some elite board telling us what should make us happy, that the common folk
are wrong.   Then we tax them to pay for stadiums and opera houses.

By some definitions that's "good".