Backhands: one hand vs. two

Backhands: one hand vs. two

Post by alan johns » Sat, 04 Dec 1993 04:30:49


Hi yall

I have a two handed backhand that is fairly consistent but kinda weak.
I have fiddled with a one hand backhand in recent weeks.  It is
definitely not as  consistent as my two-hander, but it is a much
more potent weapon.  My dilemna is:  Should I make a permanent switch?

MY QUESTION TO YOU TENNIS PLAYERS OUT THERE IS:  WHICH IS BETTER A TWO
HAND BACKHAND OR A ONE HAND?  WHY?

All responses will be appreciated!

Alan Johnson

 
 
 

Backhands: one hand vs. two

Post by Stanford Guillo » Sat, 04 Dec 1993 05:11:54

Quote:

>MY QUESTION TO YOU TENNIS PLAYERS OUT THERE IS:  WHICH IS BETTER A TWO
>HAND BACKHAND OR A ONE HAND?  WHY?

As with most things, the answer is not clear cut. I have a one-handed
backhand and a very potent one. I can best explain the allure of a
one-handed backhand by offering a common compliment I receive on
my backhand, "You can't tell where it is going! You disguise it well!".

Slice backhands are probably a little more comfortable for me than
they would be for a two-hander. And I can delay the decision of slice
or topspin until very late without giving away my intention.

The one disadvantage has to be that very low balls and high balls are
difficult. Low balls can be handled by going to slice, and actually
that's pretty much what you have to do with high balls too.

A two-hander can still rip topspin on low and high balls. The only
disadvantage is probably the less reach, and perhaps not as much
touch on the backhand side.

My advice would be that unless you are very young, say under 12, go
with a one-hander. You can generate as much power as a two-hander
and you will have more disguise on your shot as well as be able to
handle a variety of situations with basically the same stroke.

Quote:
>All responses will be appreciated!
>Alan Johnson

Stanford S. Guillory


 
 
 

Backhands: one hand vs. two

Post by Raza Ba » Sat, 04 Dec 1993 05:33:13


writes:

Quote:
> Hi yall

> I have a two handed backhand that is fairly consistent but kinda weak.
> I have fiddled with a one hand backhand in recent weeks.  It is
> definitely not as  consistent as my two-hander, but it is a much
> more potent weapon.  My dilemna is:  Should I make a permanent switch?

> MY QUESTION TO YOU TENNIS PLAYERS OUT THERE IS:  WHICH IS BETTER A TWO
> HAND BACKHAND OR A ONE HAND?  WHY?

> All responses will be appreciated!

> Alan Johnson


A one handed backhand is definately more versatile then a two handed one.  
I myself made the switch after one year of playing tennis with a two  
handed backhand. However you have to stick to it and practice to really  
make it work...but believe me when you get the hang of it , it will be  
your favourite shot. It has more reach and in a way even more power since  
you go through a full swing. A double handed backhand is I htink better  
for service returns but I think thats the only advantage.  I single handed  
backhand helps your backhand volley a lot too. Looking at Sampras and  
Edberg who both had double handers earlier in their carriers and later  
made the switch and became the worlds two top plyers in their own primes(  
afcourse Sampras is stillup there).
Raza

 
 
 

Backhands: one hand vs. two

Post by Charles L » Sat, 04 Dec 1993 05:45:01

Quote:

>Hi yall

>I have a two handed backhand that is fairly consistent but kinda weak.
>I have fiddled with a one hand backhand in recent weeks.  It is
>definitely not as  consistent as my two-hander, but it is a much
>more potent weapon.  My dilemna is:  Should I make a permanent switch?

>MY QUESTION TO YOU TENNIS PLAYERS OUT THERE IS:  WHICH IS BETTER A TWO
>HAND BACKHAND OR A ONE HAND?  WHY?

    As Stanford said, there is not necessarily a better way.   One hand
tends to give you more power because you can swing on a greater arc, but
then there have been fairly famous powerful two handers such as
Jimmy Connors or Monica Seles.   The usual drawback of two handed shots
are a little in reach, where many two handers stretch to one when
pulled wide (but then that will be a defensive shot in either case).
The advantage is in controlling a quick wrist flick when in tight
situations.

    If you want a little more power, you might try an option that Borg did
(and Wilander to some extent).   You can release your supporting hand
(say, the left hand for right handers using a conventional two handed
backhand) and follow-through further.   Release the left hand somewhere
near the point of contact (usually a little afterwards) and have the racquet
follow-through further (perhaps over your head).

   If you do decide to go one-handed, you will have to work at getting
the consistency which means you should practice the stroke a lot.  You
may also want to make sure you can hit a consistent half-pace shot
instead of going for the power shot all the time, so that  you can
play some rallies.

--
Charles Lin

 
 
 

Backhands: one hand vs. two

Post by David Hans » Sat, 04 Dec 1993 12:26:07

Interesting that a couple people have suggested that a one-handed
backhand is more powerful than a two-handed backhand.  I don't think
that the length of the stroke has anything to do with power.  The ball
is on the strings for such a short time that power is all a matter of
force at the point of impact, not follow-through.

Personally I switched to a two-handed backhand a couple years ago after
suffering with a miserable one-handed backhand.  It was odd and took
some getting used to, but I've achieved much greater consistency
with two hands than I ever did with one.  I'm tall, but don't have
great forearm or wrist strength and had trouble controlling a one
handed backhand.  I also didn't have a very good understanding of the
stroke frankly.

One advantage with two hands is that timing isn't as critical.  Balls
that I must short-hop are easier to keep in play.  I also find that I
have much better disguise with a two-handed backhand.  I can line up
for a down-the-line pass and with a last minute flick of the wrists
take the ball cross-court.  I also have no problem using a one-handed
slice backhand.

Recently I've begun to experiment with an occasional one-handed topspin
backhand.  Using the two-hander has helped me get a feel for the proper
one-handed stroke and I find that I can hit a much more consitent
one-handed backhand than I ever could when I used it regularly.  But I
haven't found a compelling reason to abandon the two-handed shot.  I
find that I have greater power and accuracy with two hands.  And as
Stanford noted, it's nice to be able to rip both low and high balls
with a two-handed shot, especially on an agressive approach.

- David
--
 David M. Hansen    |  Department of Computer Science and Engineering

(503)690-1121 ex7367|                   PO Box 91000
fax: (503)690-1553  |               Portland, OR 97291-1000

 
 
 

Backhands: one hand vs. two

Post by Trond Vidar Ols » Sat, 04 Dec 1993 20:18:19

I play both one and two handed backhand. Two handed for heavy topspin,
one handed for slice and deplacement shots.
If you can play all shots one handed, that'll be the best solution!

my 0.10 kroner

:)

 
 
 

Backhands: one hand vs. two

Post by Eddie Hedg » Sun, 05 Dec 1993 00:24:46

Quote:

> Hi yall
> I have a two handed backhand that is fairly consistent but kinda weak.
> I have fiddled with a one hand backhand in recent weeks.  It is
> definitely not as  consistent as my two-hander, but it is a much
> more potent weapon.  My dilemna is:  Should I make a permanent switch?

  ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Quote:
> MY QUESTION TO YOU TENNIS PLAYERS OUT THERE IS:  WHICH IS BETTER A TWO
> HAND BACKHAND OR A ONE HAND?  WHY?
> All responses will be appreciated!
> Alan Johnson


 Hi Alan,
  Sounds like you answered your own question. :-) I've really enjoyed reading
people's responses to this. In my case I started taking lessons using a one-
handed backhand and have tried using two hands but I just can't seem to
control it. :-( Seems it would be a good idea to try out the suggestions the
netters came up with.  
Eddie
--

       o
            "Serve Hard, Volley Deep,            
  /\O/      
 0  \\        Seize Your Break Points And Grin Like A Pirate" -Newk  
    //        
 
 
 

Backhands: one hand vs. two

Post by tak0.. » Sun, 05 Dec 1993 01:03:07

In my opinion on two handed backhand is a good way to use it since it gives
more control which translate consistent return... where as one hand backhand
gives more power and manuverability.  So when I play tennis.. I usually use
either one depending on the situation and how I want to return the ball.
But I use one hand the most because I like to move while on run but as a
baseliner myself I usually resort to two-handed since I want consistency.

                                                        Indy

 
 
 

Backhands: one hand vs. two

Post by Matthew Di » Sun, 05 Dec 1993 02:33:23


Quote:

>MY QUESTION TO YOU TENNIS PLAYERS OUT THERE IS:  WHICH IS BETTER A TWO
>HAND BACKHAND OR A ONE HAND?  WHY?

I guess my analysis is that all things being equal, a one-handed back hand
is probably more versatile and allows for a longer range, so would serve
you better.

Pros and cons from a former teacher:

Pros (two handed)
Easier to learn
Better control throughout learning curve
Less preparation needed (shorter backswing)
Quicker response (shorter follow through)
More natural cross-court shot

Cons (two handed)
Less power
Less versatile shot selection
More obvious shots (you can't camoflage it as well, at least I can not)
Not as natural down the line shot

These are my opinions of course, people will definitely disagree with me, and
you may find me way off, I'm just telling you my experience.  

Finally, it depends how much time you can put into it, and where you are in
your game.  If you are an *** who will play once a week or once a month for
the rest of your playing career (occasional club tourney thrown in) I would
not change it as you would not have enough time to throw into making the
change work, and to get you over the initial shot-change awkwardness.  On the
other hand, if you can get a coach and some serious time committed, or you are
relatively new to formalized stroke production, I would go for a one-hander
as it is a more versatile stroke.

Any comments, questions, challenges, etc. are appreciate.

matt***

 
 
 

Backhands: one hand vs. two

Post by Alexander Michael Eberso » Sun, 05 Dec 1993 08:00:03

|> Hi yall
|>
|> I have a two handed backhand that is fairly consistent but kinda weak.
|> I have fiddled with a one hand backhand in recent weeks.  It is
|> definitely not as  consistent as my two-hander, but it is a much
|> more potent weapon.  My dilemna is:  Should I make a permanent switch?
|>
|> MY QUESTION TO YOU TENNIS PLAYERS OUT THERE IS:  WHICH IS BETTER A TWO
|> HAND BACKHAND OR A ONE HAND?  WHY?
|>
|> All responses will be appreciated!
|>
|> Alan Johnson

I have been through a similar situation.  The two-hander works better for me,
especially on passing shots, even though I can hit a harder one-handed backhand.  

As far as which one is better, that depends on your game.  

-If you are a baseliner, the two-hander will probably be more effective,
particlarly in handling high-bouncing balls and hitting passing shots.  Also, a
two-hander is much easier to hit on the rise.    

-If you are a serve-and-volleyer, the one-handed backhand will make the transition
from backcourt play to net play easier for you since it is difficult for many
people to switch from two-handed groundstrokes at the baseline to one-handed
volleys at the net.

-A two-handed backhand requires good upper-body rotation during the stroke to
generate good power.  I bet that this is your problem.  If you can't correct this
problem then you're better off hitting a one-handed backhand in which the
shoulders can stay closed throughout the stroke.    

-A lot more can go wrong with a one-handed backhand if your knees aren't bent,
your shoulders open up too soon, or you use an open stance.

No matter which one you choose, you should have a one-handed slice backhand which
will allow you to get the ball back when you're out of position and handle low
balls.

Hope that helps.

--Alex Ebersole

 
 
 

Backhands: one hand vs. two

Post by Alfred R. Toscan » Sat, 04 Dec 1993 20:38:58


Quote:

>Hi yall

>I have a two handed backhand that is fairly consistent but kinda weak.
>I have fiddled with a one hand backhand in recent weeks.  It is
>definitely not as  consistent as my two-hander, but it is a much
>more potent weapon.  My dilemna is:  Should I make a permanent switch?

>MY QUESTION TO YOU TENNIS PLAYERS OUT THERE IS:  WHICH IS BETTER A TWO
>HAND BACKHAND OR A ONE HAND?  WHY?

>All responses will be appreciated!

>Alan Johnson


Alan,

I have a one handed backhand and have tried the two handed one with great
success.  However, the major limitation I see with the two handed backhand
is the reach.  Why your experiencing a weak backhand you have not explained.
Most people have a powerful two handed shot and the only reason I can think
of is that your hitting the ball too early.  Example, you may be reaching
for the ball without getting your body set up to hit it.  So your reaching
instead of setting up close to the ball and hitting with power.  If timed
correctly, the two handed backhand is a fast, accurate and powerful shot.
As I said before the only flaw is in the reach.  Most two handers use one
hand to stretch for wide shots.  The big advantage of a two hander is that
you get the ball early, like Seles, and put it away.  The one hander is more
versitile and you have a greater variety of shots and positions to hit from.

Both are good for the person who becomes expert in either.  The choice
is yours in what you deam is most comfortable for you.

Good luck,

Howard

 
 
 

Backhands: one hand vs. two

Post by Roger O » Sun, 05 Dec 1993 11:07:00

Quote:

>Hi yall

>I have a two handed backhand that is fairly consistent but kinda weak.
>I have fiddled with a one hand backhand in recent weeks.  It is
>definitely not as  consistent as my two-hander, but it is a much
>more potent weapon.  My dilemna is:  Should I make a permanent switch?

>MY QUESTION TO YOU TENNIS PLAYERS OUT THERE IS:  WHICH IS BETTER A TWO
>HAND BACKHAND OR A ONE HAND?  WHY?

>All responses will be appreciated!

>Alan Johnson


        As a tennis player, I have a two-handed backhand, which generally
gives me more control than a one-handed backhand player.  However,
one-handed backhands generate more power because it is a full swing.  Not
only that, they are more versatile ( slice, the ability to reach better,
etc... ).  Because I am a recreational player, as with many recreational
player, I will generally win more points hitting the ball in and keeping
consistently, than outright winners.  That is why I chose a two-handed
backhand.

                                                        R Oen

 
 
 

Backhands: one hand vs. two

Post by Mikhail V. Solod » Sun, 05 Dec 1993 04:14:01

    I think it all pretty much depends on what style do you play.
    There seems to be a consensus that you'd better go with a
    one-hander if you play serve-&-volley.
    A two-hander sometimes helps on the return of really hard
    serves, because there is no problem with keeping your wrist firm.
    I was taught to play with two hands, but as I matured enough :)
    to appreciate aggressive tennis :), I learned one-handed backhand.
    I still return hard serves and sometimes rally with two hands,
    but I use one hand more often than not, and always when passing
    on the run and when jumping on a short ball.
    Michael.

 
 
 

Backhands: one hand vs. two

Post by Dipen Puja » Sun, 05 Dec 1993 03:57:43

Quote:

>Hi yall
>I have a two handed backhand that is fairly consistent but kinda weak.
>I have fiddled with a one hand backhand in recent weeks.  It is
>definitely not as  consistent as my two-hander, but it is a much
>more potent weapon.  My dilemna is:  Should I make a permanent switch?
>MY QUESTION TO YOU TENNIS PLAYERS OUT THERE IS:  WHICH IS BETTER A TWO
>HAND BACKHAND OR A ONE HAND?  WHY?
>All responses will be appreciated!
>Alan Johnson


There is no answer as to which is a better backhand. You should use the one
that suits your style of play.
IMO single-handed backhands are good for players who have a serve and volley
game (such as Edberg, McEnroe, Becker, Sampras, Stich) . I don't know why, but
players having a single-handed backhand tend to position themselves better for a
volley than their counterparts.
On the other a double handed backhand tends to suit baseliners such as Courier,
Agassi.
A solid double handed backhand can have a big advantage against weak serve and
volleyers.

Dipen
--
--------
Dipen Pujara                            Relational Data Systems
Phone: (714)263-3896 ext 133            30 Executive Park Suite 260

 
 
 

Backhands: one hand vs. two

Post by Probal Kumar Bhattacharj » Sun, 05 Dec 1993 05:23:35

Quote:

>Interesting that a couple people have suggested that a one-handed
>backhand is more powerful than a two-handed backhand.  I don't think
>that the length of the stroke has anything to do with power.  The ball
>is on the strings for such a short time that power is all a matter of
>force at the point of impact, not follow-through.

        -- IMHO, longer follow-through indicates more power transfer
at the time of impact (unless it involves excess of spin).

Quote:
>some getting used to, but I've achieved much greater consistency

        -- For us recreation-level players, two-handed shot helps to
have more consistency as the feeling for the shot is better.

Quote:
>that I must short-hop are easier to keep in play.  I also find that I
>have much better disguise with a two-handed backhand.  I can line up

      ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Quote:
>for a down-the-line pass and with a last minute flick of the wrists
>take the ball cross-court.  I also have no problem using a one-handed

        -- This is supposed to be the other advantage of two-handed
backhand or for that matter two-handed forehand too. I distinctly remember
Chris Evert commenting on this aspect of Seles' game (should be some
Wimbledon as Chris is with NBC). When someone else mentioned that he had
more disguise with one-handed backhand, that sounded surprising ! IMHO,
for one-handed backhand, stroke-preparation exposes the diretion more than
two-handed (unless it is someone like Pioline with too much of last minute
wrist-flick). But again there is a difference between recreation-level
game and professional-level game.

Quote:
>- David

        --P.