Liu Guoliang Applies For Chief Coach Of Chinese Men's Team

Liu Guoliang Applies For Chief Coach Of Chinese Men's Team

Post by John Schneide » Tue, 24 Jun 2003 17:46:57


http://english.peopledaily.com.cn/200306/23/eng20030623_118745.shtml

Liu Guoliang Applies For Chief Coach of Chinese Men's Table Tennis Team

On June 22 the Table Tennis & Badminton Administrative Center Under the
State General Administration of Sports declared the establishment of the
coach leading team of the national table tennis team for 2004 Olympic
Games, as well as the adjustment of the coach team.

On the base of earnestly summing up the experience and lessons of the
47th World Table Tennis Championships, in view of the international
development trend of table tennis and the concrete conditions of the
coach team, the leaders of the Table Tennis & Badminton Administrative
Center and Chinese Table Tennis Association has by way of serious
consideration decided to establish the coach leading team to prepare for
2004 Olympic Games in order to fulfill the missions of the team
competitions of the World Championships in Athens Olympic Games.

Cai Zhenhua, Deputy Director of the Table Tennis & Badminton
Administrative Center and the chief coach of Chinese Table Tennis Team,
assumes office as the head of the coach team, and Lu Yuansheng, Yin Xiao
and Li Xiaodong as the deputy head. Liu Guoliang is in charge of the
men's team and his position as the chief coach of the men's team is
submitted to the State General Administration of Sports for approval; Lu
Yuansheng is concurrently the chief coach of the women's team.

Meanwhile, the Table Tennis & Badminton Administrative Center also
decides a new management mechanism will be tried out in the men's team
and instead, the former mechanism dividing the whole men team into No. 1
team and No.2 team will be called off. From now on, three to four coach
teams will be set up under the leadership of the chief coach, and the top
players and other players will be organized and administrated in these
groups according to their abilities and ages. The main purpose of trying
out the new mechanism is to further define the assignments and
responsibilities of each team, form a competitive mechanism, bring the
initiative of coaches into full play, improve the team administration and
training and ensure the breakthrough and development of the men's team
before the rigorous challenges in the international table tennis field.

 
 
 

Liu Guoliang Applies For Chief Coach Of Chinese Men's Team

Post by Dave William » Tue, 24 Jun 2003 19:58:04

John and all...

OK, sounds like a shake up of some sort....in response to the
disappointing men's team performance at the Worlds?????

For discussion's sake, isn't this is the part of Chinese table tennis
that always seems a bit "over the top",   The Chinese men have been
playing very well in recent years and showed no particular weakness on
the Pro Tour, with Ma Lin and Wang Hao showing very strong results.
 They are deeper than any men's program in the world hands down.

Except for the fact that defenders had their best results in years,
there is no "new menace" out there.  Schlager and Kreanga won very few,
if any major matches against Chinese players coming in to the Worlds (at
by my recollection, John????) and I'm scratching my head as to what
shortcoming in Chinese preparation could be identified as the cause of
them not winning Men's Singles.

If I read the article correctly, it does sound like they are casting
some aspersions on the Number One Team players and want to shake them up
by placing them in a meat grinder together with the Number Two players,
which I assume would include some of the younger aspirants.

To ask the Chinese men to be more *** is akin, in my opinion, to
getting *** from a turnip, but this is Chinese table tennis and the
quest for perfection has deep roots, I guess.  A failure has occurred
and some response is now required.

Thoughts.

Lefty

Quote:

>http://SportToday.org/

>Liu Guoliang Applies For Chief Coach of Chinese Men's Table Tennis Team

>On June 22 the Table Tennis & Badminton Administrative Center Under the
>State General Administration of Sports declared the establishment of the
>coach leading team of the national table tennis team for 2004 Olympic
>Games, as well as the adjustment of the coach team.

>On the base of earnestly summing up the experience and lessons of the
>47th World Table Tennis Championships, in view of the international
>development trend of table tennis and the concrete conditions of the
>coach team, the leaders of the Table Tennis & Badminton Administrative
>Center and Chinese Table Tennis Association has by way of serious
>consideration decided to establish the coach leading team to prepare for
>2004 Olympic Games in order to fulfill the missions of the team
>competitions of the World Championships in Athens Olympic Games.

>Cai Zhenhua, Deputy Director of the Table Tennis & Badminton
>Administrative Center and the chief coach of Chinese Table Tennis Team,
>assumes office as the head of the coach team, and Lu Yuansheng, Yin Xiao
>and Li Xiaodong as the deputy head. Liu Guoliang is in charge of the
>men's team and his position as the chief coach of the men's team is
>submitted to the State General Administration of Sports for approval; Lu
>Yuansheng is concurrently the chief coach of the women's team.

>Meanwhile, the Table Tennis & Badminton Administrative Center also
>decides a new management mechanism will be tried out in the men's team
>and instead, the former mechanism dividing the whole men team into No. 1
>team and No.2 team will be called off. From now on, three to four coach
>teams will be set up under the leadership of the chief coach, and the top
>players and other players will be organized and administrated in these
>groups according to their abilities and ages. The main purpose of trying
>out the new mechanism is to further define the assignments and
>responsibilities of each team, form a competitive mechanism, bring the
>initiative of coaches into full play, improve the team administration and
>training and ensure the breakthrough and development of the men's team
>before the rigorous challenges in the international table tennis field.


 
 
 

Liu Guoliang Applies For Chief Coach Of Chinese Men's Team

Post by Elle » Wed, 25 Jun 2003 00:52:41



Quote:
>  The player begged to be defaulted from all his matches
>  by following Ref around
> shouting "My racket is Illegal! My racket is Illegal!".

This is an outright lie.
Would you like me dig up the post you made where you said the
the player came to the  control desk and was defaulted using
illegal procedures against US laws

You have her mistaken with Larry Hodges who follows around
players at tournaments & harasses them.

Folks, look at the statement made by this clown.
He claims that the player was "shouting".

Alan, you have no credibility except as a thug.
The simple fact remains that you threatened the player with
physical *** (with postings on the USENET) not to
show up. When she showed up anyway you used
unfair procedures & methods to default him

Quote:
>   Player was  defaulted

Against the US laws

Quote:
> and result submitted.

What results ?
Were the ratings processed ?
How funny can you get ?

 
 
 

Liu Guoliang Applies For Chief Coach Of Chinese Men's Team

Post by Gym05 » Wed, 25 Jun 2003 01:06:40


Quote:
> Except for the fact that defenders had their best results in years,
> there is no "new menace" out there.

I completely agree with you. ITTF had made every effort to
accommodate the Europeans by limiting the pips & Asian cheating
as much as possible in every AGM / BGM again & again.
For example Aspect Ratio, 40mm ball , Pip Density rule etc.
The long pips ban is scheduled for the Eq Committee at AGM2004
I hope it passes.
 
 
 

Liu Guoliang Applies For Chief Coach Of Chinese Men's Team

Post by John Schneide » Wed, 25 Jun 2003 04:42:57



Quote:
> John and all...

> OK, sounds like a shake up of some sort....in response to the
> disappointing men's team performance at the Worlds?????

Sounds that way to me too.  Chinese players took gold and silver in every
event except the biggest one, Men's Singles.

Quote:

> For discussion's sake, isn't this is the part of Chinese table tennis
> that always seems a bit "over the top",   The Chinese men have been
> playing very well in recent years and showed no particular weakness on
> the Pro Tour, with Ma Lin and Wang Hao showing very strong results.
>  They are deeper than any men's program in the world hands down.

Hard to argue with that.

Quote:

> Except for the fact that defenders had their best results in years,
> there is no "new menace" out there.  Schlager and Kreanga won very few,
> if any major matches against Chinese players coming in to the Worlds (at
> by my recollection, John????) and I'm scratching my head as to what
> shortcoming in Chinese preparation could be identified as the cause of
> them not winning Men's Singles.

Yes, both Schlager and Kreanga have poor records against the top Chinese
players.  Schlager did beat Kong at the 1999 World Cup, where he ended up
losing to Samsonov in the final.  The Austrian also had a previous win
over Wang Liqin (2002 Polish Open) and he had a total of three match
points against Wang at the 2001 World Cup.  Kreanga has wins over Qin
Zhijian (2002 Grand Finals) and Liu Guoliang (2001 Danish Open).  BTW,
Kreanga didn't face any Chinese players in Paris due to Chen Weixing's
win over Wang Hao and Joo Se Hyuk's win over Ma Lin.  Kreanga is 0-5
against Ma during the last four years and he lost badly to Wang Hao in
their only meeting.  So Ma Lin or Wang Hao probably would have reached
the final if they hadn't lost those 11-9 in the 7th matches to the
looping choppers.  Ma destroyed Schlager at the Danish Open last
November.  Schlager hasn't played Wang Hao yet but I suspect he'd have
trouble with him too.

Also, it's very likely that there would have been a Chinese champion in
Men's Singles if Wang Liqin or Kong had defeated Schlager (Kong had a
match point and Wang had a total of five match points) since the two of
them, especially Kong, are very strong against choppers.  So two areas
where the Chinese men apparently need to improve are pressure situations
in close matches (they seem to still be having trouble with 11 point
games) and ability, particularly for their penholders, to defeat
defenders.  Both of these aspects are discussed in articles at Chung
Lau's site: http://SportToday.org/~chunglau/ttindex.htm

Quote:

> If I read the article correctly, it does sound like they are casting
> some aspersions on the Number One Team players and want to shake them up
> by placing them in a meat grinder together with the Number Two players,
> which I assume would include some of the younger aspirants.

> To ask the Chinese men to be more *** is akin, in my opinion, to
> getting *** from a turnip, but this is Chinese table tennis and the
> quest for perfection has deep roots, I guess.  A failure has occurred
> and some response is now required.

> Thoughts.

> Lefty

 
 
 

Liu Guoliang Applies For Chief Coach Of Chinese Men's Team

Post by Cole El » Wed, 25 Jun 2003 08:22:31

So do you consider this a promotion or a demotion for Cai?  Is this like
being fired as coach of an NBA team and given a parachute job as director of
operations?


Quote:


> > John and all...

> > OK, sounds like a shake up of some sort....in response to the
> > disappointing men's team performance at the Worlds?????

> Sounds that way to me too.  Chinese players took gold and silver in every
> event except the biggest one, Men's Singles.

> > For discussion's sake, isn't this is the part of Chinese table tennis
> > that always seems a bit "over the top",   The Chinese men have been
> > playing very well in recent years and showed no particular weakness on
> > the Pro Tour, with Ma Lin and Wang Hao showing very strong results.
> >  They are deeper than any men's program in the world hands down.

> Hard to argue with that.

> > Except for the fact that defenders had their best results in years,
> > there is no "new menace" out there.  Schlager and Kreanga won very few,
> > if any major matches against Chinese players coming in to the Worlds (at
> > by my recollection, John????) and I'm scratching my head as to what
> > shortcoming in Chinese preparation could be identified as the cause of
> > them not winning Men's Singles.

> Yes, both Schlager and Kreanga have poor records against the top Chinese
> players.  Schlager did beat Kong at the 1999 World Cup, where he ended up
> losing to Samsonov in the final.  The Austrian also had a previous win
> over Wang Liqin (2002 Polish Open) and he had a total of three match
> points against Wang at the 2001 World Cup.  Kreanga has wins over Qin
> Zhijian (2002 Grand Finals) and Liu Guoliang (2001 Danish Open).  BTW,
> Kreanga didn't face any Chinese players in Paris due to Chen Weixing's
> win over Wang Hao and Joo Se Hyuk's win over Ma Lin.  Kreanga is 0-5
> against Ma during the last four years and he lost badly to Wang Hao in
> their only meeting.  So Ma Lin or Wang Hao probably would have reached
> the final if they hadn't lost those 11-9 in the 7th matches to the
> looping choppers.  Ma destroyed Schlager at the Danish Open last
> November.  Schlager hasn't played Wang Hao yet but I suspect he'd have
> trouble with him too.

> Also, it's very likely that there would have been a Chinese champion in
> Men's Singles if Wang Liqin or Kong had defeated Schlager (Kong had a
> match point and Wang had a total of five match points) since the two of
> them, especially Kong, are very strong against choppers.  So two areas
> where the Chinese men apparently need to improve are pressure situations
> in close matches (they seem to still be having trouble with 11 point
> games) and ability, particularly for their penholders, to defeat
> defenders.  Both of these aspects are discussed in articles at Chung
> Lau's site: http://SportToday.org/~chunglau/ttindex.htm

> > If I read the article correctly, it does sound like they are casting
> > some aspersions on the Number One Team players and want to shake them up
> > by placing them in a meat grinder together with the Number Two players,
> > which I assume would include some of the younger aspirants.

> > To ask the Chinese men to be more *** is akin, in my opinion, to
> > getting *** from a turnip, but this is Chinese table tennis and the
> > quest for perfection has deep roots, I guess.  A failure has occurred
> > and some response is now required.

> > Thoughts.

> > Lefty

 
 
 

Liu Guoliang Applies For Chief Coach Of Chinese Men's Team

Post by JJ4T » Wed, 25 Jun 2003 09:49:25

You think the Chinese are trying to emulate the US?

Quote:
>>>>So do you consider this a promotion or a demotion for Cai?  Is this like

being fired as coach of an NBA team and given a parachute job as director of
operations?
 
 
 

Liu Guoliang Applies For Chief Coach Of Chinese Men's Team

Post by Cole El » Wed, 25 Jun 2003 12:47:03

I think some patterns are found throughout humanity.  If China flat out
fires Cai, they're admitting failure.


Quote:
> You think the Chinese are trying to emulate the US?

> >>>>So do you consider this a promotion or a demotion for Cai?  Is this
like
> being fired as coach of an NBA team and given a parachute job as director
of
> operations?

 
 
 

Liu Guoliang Applies For Chief Coach Of Chinese Men's Team

Post by John Schneide » Thu, 26 Jun 2003 10:45:03



Quote:
> Also, it's very likely that there would have been a Chinese champion in
> Men's Singles if Wang Liqin or Kong had defeated Schlager (Kong had a
> match point and Wang had a total of five match points) since the two of
> them, especially Kong, are very strong against choppers.  So two areas
> where the Chinese men apparently need to improve are pressure situations
> in close matches (they seem to still be having trouble with 11 point
> games) and ability, particularly for their penholders, to defeat
> defenders.  Both of these aspects are discussed in articles at Chung
> Lau's site: http://home.covad.net/~chunglau/ttindex.htm

Here's a relevant article about Wang Liqin:

http://makeashorterlink.com/?Z13A36A05

Battling the inner demons

After his loss to Austrian Werner Schlager at the 47th World Table Tennis
Championships, Wang Liqin realizes it's his mental game that still needs
improving, as Zhou Zuyi reports.

Wang Liqin isn't a typical world champion. He's quiet, keeps a low
profile and is incredibly shy. Only several words into the conversation
finds Wang blushing. Although he represents one-half of the world's No 1
table tennis duo and is part of the reigning Olympic gold medalist team
in doubles play, Wang has always been uncomfortable talking about
himself.

"I've improved a lot through the years (on dealing with the press)," he
smiles softly, eyes looking at the ground. "Yet I still don't know how to
express myself properly."

This is characteristic of the native Shanghai athlete. Wang, born to an
ordinary family in the city's northern Zhabei District, behaves like
other 20-somethings on the street. But with a list of honors as long as
the Yangtze River, the 25-year-old is no ordinary citizen. His trophy
collections includes: a four-time winner of men's doubles in the
International Table Tennis Federation Year-end Grand Final, Olympic gold
medalist in men's doubles at Sydney 2000, the No 1 in men's singles at
the 2001 World Championships and dozens of professional tournament
titles.

"As an all-round player, Wang seems like a heaven-sent gift to the
Chinese table tennis team," says Shen Yimin, a sports instructor for
juniors, who introduced Wang to the sport 19 years ago.

Shen, now 62, was first impressed by Wang's size -- he was 10 centimeters
taller than the average 6-year-old. "Traditionally Chinese table tennis
instructors prefer short and quick boys," says Shen. "But I think we need
some big guys with stronger strikes. Wang was much taller than his
classmates in primary school and showed no signs of a slow mind. So I
decided to have a try on him."

Wang, now at 186 centimeters, is the tallest among China's national
players. His longer-than-average reach proves to be a nightmare to many
rivals. "Wang plays more like a European," says Shen, who coached Wang
for his first eight years in the game. "So far no one on the Chinese team
can match the strength of their arch rivals across the continent except
Wang, yet he also boasts exquisite skills compared with the overseas
players. The wonderful mixture makes him unique in the top echelon of the
sport."

Hmmmmm, sounds like Wang is invincible. Wrong. In some ways, Wang's
fragile personality is his own worst enemy during big matches. "I know I
was not mentally strong enough on court," he says. "I was not myself at
certain critical moments (during some matches) ... maybe that's somewhat
because of my quiet personality."

Though defending the title of men's doubles with his partner Yan Sen
doesn't appear to phase Wang, he succumbs to the greater pressure
inherent in singles play regularly. The national team even ruled him out
of the Olympic singles squad in 2000 simply because of his "unsteady in
form."

At the recently concluded 47th World Table Tennis Championships, his
mental weakness cost him an opportunity to win back-to-back world
championships.

On May 24 at Bercy Stadium, Paris, where Wang battled with Austria's
Werner Schlager in the quarter-finals, the Austrian was down 2-3 in the
best-of-seven set match and Wang was only one step away from victory with
a 10-6 lead in the sixth set. "I had four match points, I wanted to play
safe and clean but Schlager showed his guts," Wang says.

An aggressive serve by Schlager was ensued with a rally during which one
of the strokes hit the edge of the table on Wang's side, breaking his
pace and costing him one match point. Schlager followed with a hard-hit
forehand winner. The Austrian's risk-taking strategy finally paid off:
Wang collapsed and Schlager advanced to the final and won the
championship by beating South Korean Joo Se Hyuk.

"I saw him bury his face in the towel weeping," says his doubles partner
Yan. "I can understand that. It's rather hard to face such a loss."

Coach Shen, however, sees deeper.

"Actually Wang Liqin beat himself, not the person on the other end of the
table," says Shen. "I know that his introverted personality has something
to do with this stumble. But too much criticism will not help. Wang is a
perfectionist whose focus on every single point adds extra pressure. He
needs to adjust that attitude himself."

Unlike his national team peers with strong table tennis backgrounds, such
as Kong Linghui and Liu Guoliang, whose fathers are both prominent table
tennis coaches, Wang seemingly came from nowhere.

Wang's parents were truck drivers at a local factory and sent their son
to play the sport at a young age to improve his fitness. "You can find
the same character traits in each family member," says Shen. "They're
amiable, simple-hearted and introverted. "It's comfortable to come to
terms with these people off-court, but when it comes to competitive
sport, you need something more."

Wang is clearly aware of his weakness. He's trying to communicate more
with coaches as a way to adjust his approach to the game. Attentive
spectators may notice more roars from the quiet guy at future
tournaments. "I just strive to alleviate the pressure (of the game) one
way or another," Wang says.

His current coach of the national team, Shi Zhihao, a multiple world
champion himself and a Shanghai native as well, is apparently happy with
the change. "To players like Wang Liqin, the coach should be more like a
friend and give him more freedom," Shi says. "From a technical point of
view, Wang is almost perfect. But he needs to sharpen his mental game."

Wang entered the national team in 1993 and two years later won his first
champion at the U-17 championships. His career peaked at the 2001 World
Championships in Osaka, Japan, where he achieved an epic come-from-behind
victory against Kong Linghui in the final, claiming his first world
championship title in singles play.

"I fought back from a 0-2 deficit and finally beat him," he recalls, his
eyes glittering. "I'd like a repeat, not of that match, but of the
strength inside myself at that very moment."

Surely it won't take long. The 48th World Table Tennis Championships, to
be held in Shanghai, is only two years away. One of Shanghai's favorite
sons may well turn in a performance that satisfies a nation, but most of
all satisfies himself. Away from table tennis, Wang Liqin is introverted
and shy. -- Wang Rongjiang

Wang strives to return the ball during a competition. He is currently
ranked No 5 in the ITTF men's singles category after his loss in the
quarter-final to Austrian Werner Schlager, who is now ranked the top
player, at the 47th World Table Tennis Championships in Paris last month.
-- Xu Jiajun

Wang plays football against the Shanghai women's soccer team during
national table tennis team training in Shanghai this month. Wang scored
six goals in the game. -- Guo Yijiang