One or two-handed backhand?

One or two-handed backhand?

Post by y.. » Fri, 25 Oct 1996 04:00:00



Quote:
>The problem is that I have a satisfactory, to my level of game anyhow,
>one-handed backhand that works well for low-bouncing balls.  However,
>for higher-bouncing balls or ones with a lot of pace (such as a strong
>serve) I often have to go to a two-handed backhand return, which is not
>powerful nor reliable.

Slice or block powerful serve like Sampras does.
Hit high backhands up and with topspin, making them bouncing
even higher then on your side.

How does this sounds, tennistv?

Olimpionic Ostap.

 
 
 

One or two-handed backhand?

Post by Kwansik K » Fri, 25 Oct 1996 04:00:00


Quote:
>   I have had this problem with my backhand for a while and I thought you,
>   the knowledgable and talented contributors to this NG, may help me.  
>   The problem is that I have a satisfactory, to my level of game anyhow,
>   one-handed backhand that works well for low-bouncing balls.  However,
>   for higher-bouncing balls or ones with a lot of pace (such as a strong
>   serve) I often have to go to a two-handed backhand return, which is not
>   powerful nor reliable.  I can easily make flat, topspin, or slice shots
>   with one hand yet I can only return flat with a two-handed gripping (I
>   messed up topspin and slice shots too many times to try again).  To make
>   the problem worse is that I often have to make a split second decision
>   in terms of whether I would use one or two hands for balls coming in
>   with a pace or height that falls in the gray areas.  I have a lot of
>   confidence in my one-handed return but I also know that it would be very
>   hard to hit certain shots with only one hand.  What should I do?

I can share this problem as a fellow player who had this problem.
IMO, it all depends on what kinds of game you have and you want to develope.
If you really need good return, I think you'll be better off with 2 hander.
If your other parts of your game can back up your relatively weak return
game, you might want to enjoy the verstile 1 hander. For some reasons,
there has been no great volleyer with 2 handed backhand. Then again, there
are enough number of gabage volleyers with 1 handers.

   IMHO, in the level of 4.0 or less, there is no big difference. 4.5 guys
constantly attack the one-handed backhand with huge serves. 3.5-4.0 people
do attack the weak side but their serve is usually fairly returnable.
Backhand chip returns are usually enough to make 3.5-4.0 people
volley defensively. With 4.5 guys, you have to scare them
with flat returns once in a while and it's tough to scare them
with one hander. Weak 1 handed backhand return is really problem
against strong 4.0 or higher players, from my experiences.

   You sound like you want to have both. Marc Rosset does it, as I know.
IMHO, you gotta choose either one of them. I learned enough lessons
while I was caught in the "no men's land" swing between the leggy,
slender susan and glamourous, voluptuous nancy.  :-)

Kwansik

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One or two-handed backhand?

Post by Lee D Ha » Fri, 25 Oct 1996 04:00:00

I have had this problem with my backhand for a while and I thought you,
the knowledgable and talented contributors to this NG, may help me.  

The problem is that I have a satisfactory, to my level of game anyhow,
one-handed backhand that works well for low-bouncing balls.  However,
for higher-bouncing balls or ones with a lot of pace (such as a strong
serve) I often have to go to a two-handed backhand return, which is not
powerful nor reliable.  I can easily make flat, topspin, or slice shots
with one hand yet I can only return flat with a two-handed gripping (I
messed up topspin and slice shots too many times to try again).  To make
the problem worse is that I often have to make a split second decision
in terms of whether I would use one or two hands for balls coming in
with a pace or height that falls in the gray areas.  I have a lot of
confidence in my one-handed return but I also know that it would be very
hard to hit certain shots with only one hand.  What should I do?

Any input is welcome.  Thanks in advance.

Lee Han

 
 
 

One or two-handed backhand?

Post by tenni.. » Sat, 26 Oct 1996 04:00:00

Quote:


> >The problem is that I have a satisfactory, to my level of game anyhow,
> >one-handed backhand that works well for low-bouncing balls.  However,
> >for higher-bouncing balls or ones with a lot of pace (such as a strong
> >serve) I often have to go to a two-handed backhand return, which is not
> >powerful nor reliable.

> Slice or block powerful serve like Sampras does.
> Hit high backhands up and with topspin, making them bouncing
> even higher then on your side.

> How does this sounds, tennistv?

> Olympionic Ostap.

Sounds good to us.  The problem most one-hand players have with high
backhands is that they try to hit the ball while the racket is still
parallel to the court (as on a ball at hip level).  You can't do that on a
high ball.  The racket head must be higher than the ball for solid contact
high.  A high backhand is very much like a backhand volley in this
regard.  But conventional teaching has drilled its students to hit
backhands with the same low to high, parallel to the ground stroke, and
this causes problems.
 
 
 

One or two-handed backhand?

Post by K. Lee Tun » Mon, 28 Oct 1996 03:00:00


Quote:
>The problem is that I have a satisfactory, to my level of game anyhow,
>one-handed backhand that works well for low-bouncing balls.  However,
>for higher-bouncing balls or ones with a lot of pace (such as a strong
>serve) I often have to go to a two-handed backhand return, which is not
>powerful nor reliable.  I can easily make flat, topspin, or slice shots
>with one hand yet I can only return flat with a two-handed gripping (I
>messed up topspin and slice shots too many times to try again).  To make
>the problem worse is that I often have to make a split second decision
>in terms of whether I would use one or two hands for balls coming in
>with a pace or height that falls in the gray areas.  I have a lot of
>confidence in my one-handed return but I also know that it would be very
>hard to hit certain shots with only one hand.  What should I do?

>Any input is welcome.  Thanks in advance.

>Lee Han

Have you tried a one-handed slice return on the high ball that is served to you?
Returning flat but with equal pace and at an angle or with pace and down the line are also good alternatives.
Does the server usually come in after his/her serve? Then perhaps a deep lob would surprise your opponent.

It will take some time to adjust to a two-handed backhand, and also you would not necessarily be guaranteed of being able to do more=
 with regard to your returns of serve.
I have a two-handed backhand, but I used to have a one-handed, so now I'm able to do both depending on the situation.

Karlene

 
 
 

One or two-handed backhand?

Post by tenni.. » Tue, 29 Oct 1996 04:00:00


Quote:





> >> Slice or block powerful serve like Sampras does.
> >> Hit high backhands up and with topspin, making them bouncing
> >> even higher then on your side.

> >> How does this sounds, tennistv?

> >> Olympionic Ostap.

> >Sounds good to us.  The problem most one-hand players have with high
> >backhands is that they try to hit the ball while the racket is still
> >parallel to the court (as on a ball at hip level).

> > You can't do that on a high ball.  The racket head must be
> > higher than the ball for solid contact high.

> I am having a bit of trouble understanding this.  Do you mean ball, or
> perhaps handle/hand here?

Sorry.  Your assumption is correct.  The racket head must be higher than
the hand is what we meant to say.

Quote:

> >A high backhand is very much like a backhand volley in this
> >regard.  But conventional teaching has drilled its students to hit
> >backhands with the same low to high, parallel to the ground stroke, and
> >this causes problems.

> I can understand the analogy to a high backhand volley, but I don't get the
> bit about low to high, parallel to the ground stroke.  Surely you don't mean
> hit topspin from the back court like a high backhand volley.

It was the foundation of Dennis Van der Meer's (and hence, many others)
high backhand teaching for more than 20 years.  Yes you should hit the
high backhands with topspin, the wisdom went, and some people can actually
do it.  Most, however, end up with the lumpy wrist syndrome, and the
attempt to hit a high backhand the same way you hit a waist high backhand
(the only difference being how high the arm is through the stroke) is a
dismal failure.

Hitting the high (head height or above) backhand with the racket
perpendicular to the ground, rather than parallel to it, is a much
stronger stroke.  You can't hit topspin that way, but you can drive the
ball on a purposeful path deep into the opponent's court.  Most high level
players never hit a high backhand since they will take the ball earlier
(and sometimes later) in the bounce.  But if they get caught having to do
it, they will hit it as they would hit a low flying lob.

By the way, Dennis now teaches just what we've described here rather than
what he used to.

Quote:

> How would you recommend hitting an agressive topspin backhand from above head
> high unless you get the ball out in front and get the racket face over the
> ball as much as possible (which to me means getting the racquet as parallel
> to the ground as possible).  Not of course that I would choose such a shot as
> a high percentage option.

It's just this difficulty that makes topspin unavailable if the ball is
head high.  The only way to drive the ball with topspin in this case is to
hit it waist level before it gets any higher, that is, on the rise.
Anyone can do this, if they have the time to practice it.

- Show quoted text -

Quote:

> James.