Green clay?

Green clay?

Post by NighthawkBlac » Tue, 15 Aug 2006 03:13:54


As a kid I remember seeing some tournaments being held on US green clay!?!?
Is that surface still used nowdays? How different is it compared to regular
Euro red clay?
 
 
 

Green clay?

Post by Roger Tha » Tue, 15 Aug 2006 03:30:54

Quote:

> As a kid I remember seeing some tournaments being held on US green
> clay!?!? Is that surface still used nowdays? How different is it compared
> to regular Euro red clay?

It's faster. I read on wikipedia that no ATP tournament is played on green
clay, and that Charleston and Amelia Island WTA tournaments use it.

 
 
 

Green clay?

Post by arnab. » Tue, 15 Aug 2006 04:22:36

Quote:


> > As a kid I remember seeing some tournaments being held on US green
> > clay!?!? Is that surface still used nowdays? How different is it compared
> > to regular Euro red clay?

> It's faster. I read on wikipedia that no ATP tournament is played on green
> clay, and that Charleston and Amelia Island WTA tournaments use it.

Houston's men's clay tournament is on green clay. Roddick has won it a
few times.

 
 
 

Green clay?

Post by Yama » Tue, 15 Aug 2006 04:33:11

: Houston's men's clay tournament is on green clay. Roddick has won it a
: few times.

Not anymore. Houston used to be last holdout of green clay on ATP, but they're
gone for red clay too.

 
 
 

Green clay?

Post by Roger Tha » Tue, 15 Aug 2006 04:45:24

Quote:

> Houston's men's clay tournament is on green clay. Roddick has won it a
> few times.

From wikipedia:

"During many of these years, the event was held on Har-Tru, or green clay,
but the tournament now is held on red clay typical of European courts. As
the U.S. Men's Clay Court Championships is the last remaining ATP Tour
level event held in the United States on clay, no such events are currently
played on green clay. However, some lower tier tournaments (such as the
Challenger event at Forest Hills) are still played on green clay"

 
 
 

Green clay?

Post by NighthawkBlac » Tue, 15 Aug 2006 09:18:01


Quote:

>> Houston's men's clay tournament is on green clay. Roddick has won it a
>> few times.

> From wikipedia:

> "During many of these years, the event was held on Har-Tru, or green clay,
> but the tournament now is held on red clay typical of European courts. As
> the U.S. Men's Clay Court Championships is the last remaining ATP Tour
> level event held in the United States on clay, no such events are
> currently
> played on green clay. However, some lower tier tournaments (such as the
> Challenger event at Forest Hills) are still played on green clay"

A shame. The surface looks neat on TV.
 
 
 

Green clay?

Post by wen.. » Wed, 16 Aug 2006 05:54:24



Quote:




> >> Houston's men's clay tournament is on green clay. Roddick has won it
> > a
> >> few times.

> > From wikipedia:

> > "During many of these years, the event was held on Har-Tru, or green
> > clay,
> > but the tournament now is held on red clay typical of European
> > courts. As
> > the U.S. Men's Clay Court Championships is the last remaining ATP Tour
> > level event held in the United States on clay, no such events are
> > currently
> > played on green clay. However, some lower tier tournaments (such as
> > the
> > Challenger event at Forest Hills) are still played on green clay"

> A shame. The surface looks neat on TV.

Well, if it's the surface you're after...the women still play two
tournaments on it in April, Charleston and Amelia Island.

AIUI, not only is the surface faster than red clay but the ball bounces
higher. More like American players are used to, in other words.

wg

 
 
 

Green clay?

Post by jingu » Wed, 16 Aug 2006 09:07:15

Quote:

> AIUI, not only is the surface faster than red clay but the ball bounces
> higher. More like American players are used to, in other words.

my suspicion is that green clay is easier to maintain, and drains better
than does red clay.  many of the tennis clubs have green clay courts.  i
prefer real tennis, so i play on public courts, which are almost
exclusively hard courts.
 
 
 

Green clay?

Post by Yama » Thu, 17 Aug 2006 05:39:51

: my suspicion is that green clay is easier to maintain, and drains better
: than does red clay.  many of the tennis clubs have green clay courts.  i
: prefer real tennis, so i play on public courts, which are almost
: exclusively hard courts.

Green clay is so much superior surface to hardcourts that it isn't
even funny. Much more fun to play, easier to your body. Hardcourts
are destroying the game nowadays and ought to be banned.

 
 
 

Green clay?

Post by wen.. » Thu, 17 Aug 2006 06:15:14



Quote:

> : my suspicion is that green clay is easier to maintain, and drains
> better
> : than does red clay.  many of the tennis clubs have green clay courts.
>  i
> : prefer real tennis, so i play on public courts, which are almost
> : exclusively hard courts.

> Green clay is so much superior surface to hardcourts that it isn't
> even funny. Much more fun to play, easier to your body. Hardcourts
> are destroying the game nowadays and ought to be banned.

There are some other surfaces I've seen at local clubs over here; do you
know if the US uses them at all?

They're various types of carpet. One is intended to look and feel like
artificial grass. I found it gets very slippery very quickly if it starts
to rain.

The other, which one of my clubs has, is some kind of heavy woven material
that's laid, glued down, and then filled with sand. The resulting surface
is softer on the body than the hard courts underneath and rewards slice
but not topspin.

One disadvantage we've discovered lately is that wildlife seem to like
this surface. Bees and horseflies like to hover over it, and foxes like to
defecate on it.

wg

 
 
 

Green clay?

Post by topspi » Thu, 17 Aug 2006 06:21:18

Quote:




> > : my suspicion is that green clay is easier to maintain, and drains
> > better
> > : than does red clay.  many of the tennis clubs have green clay courts.
> >  i
> > : prefer real tennis, so i play on public courts, which are almost
> > : exclusively hard courts.

> > Green clay is so much superior surface to hardcourts that it isn't
> > even funny. Much more fun to play, easier to your body. Hardcourts
> > are destroying the game nowadays and ought to be banned.

> There are some other surfaces I've seen at local clubs over here; do you
> know if the US uses them at all?

> They're various types of carpet. One is intended to look and feel like
> artificial grass. I found it gets very slippery very quickly if it starts
> to rain.

I don't know if it is what we call Astroturf up here, I assume it is. I
find that better when it is wet because it binds the sand. If it isn't
kept wet the sand leaks through and it is like playing on
ball-bearings. Absolutely lethal!!

But great on your joints.

 
 
 

Green clay?

Post by pltrgys » Thu, 17 Aug 2006 06:50:07

Most "green clay" used in the US is Har-Tru. See
http://www.luckstone.com/divisions/tennis.php.

Quote:
>They're various types of carpet. One is intended to look and feel like
>artificial grass. I found it gets very slippery very quickly if it starts
>to rain.

This is popular in northern VA. It's like atro-turf with a variable amount of
sand added. I find it too slippery to play singles on.

Quote:
>The other, which one of my clubs has, is some kind of heavy woven material
>that's laid, glued down, and then filled with sand. The resulting surface
>is softer on the body than the hard courts underneath and rewards slice
>but not topspin.

Haven't seen that.

We also have what I've seen called "Sport-Court": made of squares of a plastic
grid of 1" squares about one inch thick, with little nubs on the top edges for
traction, which is frequently overlaid on old asphalt courts.
http://www.sportcourt.com/. It becomes trecherously slippery when any greenery
grows up through it. I find the foot traction fine normally, but the bounce to
be highly unpredictable.

-- Larry

 
 
 

Green clay?

Post by drew » Thu, 17 Aug 2006 07:14:59

Quote:

> One disadvantage we've discovered lately is that wildlife seem to like
> this surface. Bees and horseflies like to hover over it, and foxes like to
> defecate on it.

Foxes like to defecate on it?  I see few foxes where I live.  They are
beautiful animals.  I can't imagine such reclusive animals venturing to
empty their bowels upon a tennis court but I know in Britain they hunt
these delicate looking creatures.  They must be as proliferous as deer
here in Canada.

Thank you for this information.  Next time I'm in Britain I'll have to
check this out.

 
 
 

Green clay?

Post by Sakari Lun » Thu, 17 Aug 2006 07:47:24

On Tue, 15 Aug 2006 20:39:51 +0000 (UTC), Yama

Quote:


>: my suspicion is that green clay is easier to maintain, and drains better
>: than does red clay.  many of the tennis clubs have green clay courts.  i
>: prefer real tennis, so i play on public courts, which are almost
>: exclusively hard courts.

>Green clay is so much superior surface to hardcourts that it isn't
>even funny. Much more fun to play, easier to your body.

How would you compare playing on green clay to red clay? I have played
a lot on red clay, when I was young that was basically the only
surface I played on. But I have never even seen a green clay court
(maybe I should make an excursion to Oulu).
 
 
 

Green clay?

Post by wen.. » Thu, 17 Aug 2006 08:09:51


Quote:


> > One disadvantage we've discovered lately is that wildlife seem to like
> > this surface. Bees and horseflies like to hover over it, and foxes
> > like to
> > defecate on it.

> Foxes like to defecate on it?  I see few foxes where I live.  They are
> beautiful animals.  I can't imagine such reclusive animals venturing to
> empty their bowels upon a tennis court but I know in Britain they hunt
> these delicate looking creatures.  They must be as proliferous as deer
> here in Canada.

Dunno. But urban foxes are, I assure you, far from shy. I've even seen one
patiently awaiting a train on the (open-air) tube platform here in Kew.
(The train came, and I guess whoever he was waiting for wasn't on it,
because he trotted calmly away after a couple of minutes.) We think
there's a burrow or something not far from the courts because sometimes
you hear the most godawful screaming coming out of it, and they have been
known in the past to try to dig their way onto the courts under the
fences.

Quote:

> Thank you for this information.  Next time I'm in Britain I'll have to
> check this out.

Well, come round to Kew, and...

wg