Backhand- Double handed vs Single handed

Backhand- Double handed vs Single handed

Post by Ajay Malkan » Sat, 30 Nov 1996 04:00:00


I recently had tennis elbow and was advised to switch from single to a double handed backhand. It does feel easier on the arm but I find that it requires more coordination than a single handed grip. Can anybody tell the relative merits and demerits of the two?
Thanks. It will help me make up my mind once and for all.
Ajay Malkani

 
 
 

Backhand- Double handed vs Single handed

Post by Clint Swe » Sun, 01 Dec 1996 04:00:00

Quote:

> I recently had tennis elbow and was advised to switch from single to a

double handed backhand. It does feel easier on the arm but I find that it
requires more coordination than a single handed grip. Can anybody tell the
relative merits and demerits of the two?

Quote:
> Thanks. It will help me make up my mind once and for all.
> Ajay Malkani

A two-hander would obviously reduce the stress and strain on your elbow
because you have another arm to absorb the shock and apply power to your
shot. In fact, many people say that a two-handed backhand should be hit
(by righthanders) like a left-handed forehand with the left hand providing
most of the punch.
I believe that tennis elbow pain that comes when hitting a backhand
results from improper technique. A mechanically sound backhand shouldn't
put undue stress on your elbow.You might want to check with a good
teaching pro to see if your backhand mechanics are causing the difficulty.
I switched from one-handed to two-handed for about four years, but my goal
was to increase power and topspin.  Unfortunately, I couldn't make it work
and eventually gave up.  My biggest problem was that I could never get the
distance right between my body and the ball.  With a two-hander you need
to be closer to the ball and I always ended up reaching for the shot
because after 20 years of one-handers I always set up in the wrong place.
I think an effective two-hander requires more trunk rotation than a
one-hander,  and I was never able to develop that.
That's my two cents.
Clint Swett

 
 
 

Backhand- Double handed vs Single handed

Post by adora.. » Tue, 03 Dec 1996 04:00:00

     One handed - lot better reach for those corner balls.  Freeier
movement overall.  Requires exacting timing and stroke to generate
sufficient power and control.  Worse at taking balls late (ie. at
or behind the body).  Better at low/high balls.

    Two handed - lot easier to learn (for beginners), esp. in controlling
the ball and putting enough power behind it for weaker players.  Better
at 'hiding' the return location and angle because you can take a ball
later, plus the two hands can 'maneuver' the ball around the court
with less signalling to the opponent.  Worse at low/high balls unless
you really bend down low, reach high for those balls.  Require less
exacting timing, but is hindered in range and freedom of movement
unless you let go with one hand half-way thro the shot, etc.  

    So in general, if you can hit the ball with exacting timing and
centering most of the time, the one-handed will allow you a freeier,
more flexible game.  If you want power and don't want to work for it,
the two handed can blow that ball and opponent off the court with
fiersome intensity.

    As for the tennis elbow thing,

   1) check strings -- I've found that once you've grooved strokes to
a certain tension, upping or lowering it w/o readjusting your strokes
will cause you to adjust in bad ways.  ie. swinging too fast, using
certain parts of your body harder to compensate for less power/less
control than you normally expect.
      Also, too tight may cause you to swing faster for more topspin.
Too loose may tweak your arm with too much recoil.

    2) check swing -- spot check against a backboard or flat wall.
Start by using a little power as possible, but enough to get the ball
bouncing back to you right.  Check grip - shouldn't be too tight (
enough to prevent twising on ball contact, not so hard like you're
holding on for dear life -- too hard will cause elbow owwies).
check sound -- yep, listen for the solid twack similar to what you
hear on the TV of tennis matches.  In most cases, when you can hit
with that solid sound, and get the ball back effortlessly at the
slow pace, you're hitting optimally and your stroke generally is
correct.

        It's basically the same swing and contact point (the good
spot in your string bed, that's why you hear the crisp sound) as
you hit harder and swing faster during a real game.  

        This generally allows you to hit balls very solidly with
the lowest effort required at any speed.  If you notice funny things,
like tightning up your arm or pulling up to make something happen
in your regular groundstrokes, you're probably wacking that stroke
all out of alignment.

        3) stretch gently before and after playing -- it's the
simplest thing pros do all the time.  If you try too much with
a worked-out muscle that hasn't been often stretched, you'll
probably get a pulled muscle instead.  FLexiblity is the key
top players use to win their points.  Be a smart cookie, stretch.

        4) etc -- stress, bad raquet.  If you play when stressed
out and thinking about the kids, payments, etc, you'll affect
your body by tensing up.  Could cause the elbow prob, too.  Same
thing if the raquet is just too heavy, light, or hits strangely
in your hands.  A good raquet should do it's job right by the
first couple times you hit with it, and the results should be
predictable.  Sometimes, these funky new raquets are so wierd,
you never hit right with them.

        Finally, stay off that elbow until it's well healed.
Just like a sprained ankle, you keep using it, you'll lose it.
Let it heal naturally, then gradually, softly, work tennis back
in.  There are a few things medicine still can't heal, ya know.

       david =)

....ah, nothing like blasting someone off the court with fresh
balls and a lethal Yonex RQ-380 (grin)....

 
 
 

Backhand- Double handed vs Single handed

Post by daisyc.. » Tue, 03 Dec 1996 04:00:00

I think it is great if you can have both a single handed and a two handed
backhand in your game. Both produce such different benefits.

 
 
 

Backhand- Double handed vs Single handed

Post by Woody J » Tue, 03 Dec 1996 04:00:00

Quote:

>I think it is great if you can have both a single handed and a two handed
>backhand in your game. Both produce such different benefits.

This is what two-handlers normally do.  If you are a two-handler for the
backhand, you are supposed to use two  two hands for
top spin or flat (obviously :) ),  and one hand for slice
(also obviously, since you can't slice with two hands).

Woody Jin

 
 
 

Backhand- Double handed vs Single handed

Post by Santtu Asp TK » Tue, 03 Dec 1996 04:00:00


: top spin or flat (obviously :) ),  and one hand for slice
: (also obviously, since you can't slice with two hands).
                         ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

You should tell that to Seles and Pierce also... ;)

 
 
 

Backhand- Double handed vs Single handed

Post by Max » Tue, 03 Dec 1996 04:00:00

Quote:


>> I recently had tennis elbow and was advised to switch from single to a
>double handed backhand. It does feel easier on the arm but I find that it
>requires more coordination than a single handed grip. Can anybody tell the
>relative merits and demerits of the two?
>> Thanks. It will help me make up my mind once and for all.
>> Ajay Malkani

I have a one handed backhand and I believe it to be superior to a two handed
backhand on the following counts:

1) Two handers have to release one of their hands sometimes when they have to
stretch for a really difficult corner shot. This causes some discontinuity.
One handers are always using one hand and thus stay better grooved.

2) A one handed slice backhand is quite similar to the backhand volley that
every player must hit when under pressure at the net. Two-handers, because of
the habits they have formed on the groundstroke, have a tendency to sometimes
go after the pressure volley with two hands! This results in missed volleys
which may be why you don't often see Andre wondering up to the net.

3) In my opinion the widespread belief that two-handers can generate more
power than one-handers is a misonception. I generate a lot of power off of
the one-hander and can't imagine needing any more even if it was possible
with the two-hander (which I don't think it is). You get to put a full
shoulder turn on the backhand and you swing away from your body, so
theoretically you should be able to generate scads of power from the backhand
- this is why the backslap punch is prohibited in boxing; it is considered
too dangerous.

4) It is easier to disguise a drop shop from the one-handed backhand since
the sliced one hander looks almost identical to the one handed drop shot.

The two-hander I believe is more easily grooved early in match and tends to
be a very consistent stroke for those who use it. Also two-handers tend to be
able to be better at "cutting off" the ball and creating a sharp angle
return. Two-handers tend to find the shoulder-high ball easier also. These
benefits do not, in my opinion, outweigh the benefits of the one-hander.

As to elbow problems, I suggest looking at your stroke and concentrating on
hitting the ball well in front of the right hip (if you're right handed).
Sometimes catching the ball consistently late can cause problems.

Hope this helps! :)

Max

 
 
 

Backhand- Double handed vs Single handed

Post by Mar » Tue, 10 Dec 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

> I think it is great if you can have both a single handed and a two handed
> backhand in your game. Both produce such different benefits.

I think that this would be largely a disaster. Yeah, I know Matts Wilander
developed that one-handed slice backhand he'd hit on the run. Some
commentators thought it helped, some thought it hurt.

My own feeling is that, while "curiousity killed the cat", "indecision
killed the tennis player". You don't wanna have too much variety to choose
from out there, or you'll be caught trying to make decisions as the ball
flies by.

Mark

 
 
 

Backhand- Double handed vs Single handed

Post by Mar » Tue, 10 Dec 1996 04:00:00

Quote:

>      One handed - lot better reach for those corner balls.  Freeier
> movement overall.  Requires exacting timing and stroke to generate
> sufficient power and control.  Worse at taking balls late (ie. at
> or behind the body).

Actually, I can hit a one-handed backhand down-the-line or crosscourt with
my back to the net. Most two-handers I know need to hit that ball in front
of them.  My guess is that you meant to say that challenging balls that are
hit deep and have a one-hander on their heels can often be handled by a
solid two-handed backhand player.

Mark

 
 
 

Backhand- Double handed vs Single handed

Post by Greg Chamberla » Wed, 11 Dec 1996 04:00:00

Quote:



>> I think it is great if you can have both a single handed and a two handed
>> backhand in your game. Both produce such different benefits.

>I think that this would be largely a disaster. Yeah, I know Matts Wilander
>developed that one-handed slice backhand he'd hit on the run. Some
>commentators thought it helped, some thought it hurt.

>My own feeling is that, while "curiousity killed the cat", "indecision
>killed the tennis player". You don't wanna have too much variety to choose
>from out there, or you'll be caught trying to make decisions as the ball
>flies by.

>Mark

I disagree here Mark!.. I'm one of those the uses both one and
two-hand backhand.

The advantage of two hand: more control  over shot, but limited reach.

The one handed shot really helps on service when a wide angle is hit.

All that need to be realized is that one has to be your primary shot.
That cuts down confusion to none. Then its no different that selecting
a forehand shot imho. I've know to ocassionally hit a onehanded drop
with lots of underspin, or a onehanded shot of the backside with top.

Its all a matter of early prep, and know what you want to hit before
the ball is there.

 
 
 

Backhand- Double handed vs Single handed

Post by Charles L » Wed, 11 Dec 1996 04:00:00

|| I think that this would be largely a disaster. Yeah, I know Matts Wilander
|| developed that one-handed slice backhand he'd hit on the run. Some
|| commentators thought it helped, some thought it hurt.

|| My own feeling is that, while "curiousity killed the cat", "indecision
|| killed the tennis player". You don't wanna have too much variety to choose
|| from out there, or you'll be caught trying to make decisions as the ball
|| flies by.

    Even though Wilander could hit both a topspin backhand and a slice,
I don't recall if I've ever seen him hit a drop shot.   Most pros have
very bad drop shots and will attempt them at inopportune moments.  Wilander
seemed to avoid that problem by never hitting the shot.

    I find having a variety of shots makes it more interesting to play
tennis.   I will hit both a sliced backhand and a topspin.   The slice
comes more easily to me, and I have more confidence in it when I'm not
playing well.   The advantage of sticking to, say, one shot is that
you won't go to a weaker shot under pressure.   I recall that Scott
Davis had a topspin backhand and apparently had gotten so nervous
with the shot that he relied a lot on his slice which meant he
had problems using it offensively.    Still, despite having two choices
on my backhand, I prefer it that way.   Even one handed players will
hit both topspin and slice on their backhands, and I find it exceedingly
awkward to hit a two-handed slice backhand.

    In any case, you still want to have some kind of sliced backhand
for extreme defensive shots when you need to release the second hand
(for two-handed players).

--
Charles Lin

 
 
 

Backhand- Double handed vs Single handed

Post by nigel watso » Wed, 11 Dec 1996 04:00:00

Quote:



> > I think it is great if you can have both a single handed and a two handed
> > backhand in your game. Both produce such different benefits.

> I think that this would be largely a disaster. Yeah, I know Matts Wilander
> developed that one-handed slice backhand he'd hit on the run. Some
> commentators thought it helped, some thought it hurt.

> My own feeling is that, while "curiousity killed the cat", "indecision
> killed the tennis player". You don't wanna have too much variety to choose
> from out there, or you'll be caught trying to make decisions as the ball
> flies by.

> MarkOn court it should be your body that plays the shots not your mind. You

should be so practiced that your shots are hit almost without thinking.
How many times have you whacked back a serve with a glorious shot, the
serve being out and you have just swung at the ball and it screams back
over and in. You were relaxed, you didn`t have to think about it. The
fact that the serve was out took away the consequences of your return.
You definitely need variety in ones game, not just in technique, but in
tactics and mental toughness (whatever that is!). But these things must
just happen. Relaxed on court anything you want off-court.
Nigel
 
 
 

Backhand- Double handed vs Single handed

Post by Mar » Thu, 12 Dec 1996 04:00:00

Quote:

> MarkOn court it should be your body that plays the shots not your mind. You
> should be so practiced that your shots are hit almost without thinking.

I agree. This is why it can be a problem when you have too many different
shots to choose from. There are two-handers that always go to one-handed
when they are stretched out. This can be a successful strategy, since there
is almost no decision. But if you have to decide: one-handed or two, every
time a ball comes to the backhand side, you are doomed to fail.

Mark

 
 
 

Backhand- Double handed vs Single handed

Post by Jason C » Thu, 12 Dec 1996 04:00:00


: I disagree here Mark!.. I'm one of those the uses both one and
: two-hand backhand.

: The advantage of two hand: more control  over shot, but limited reach.

: The one handed shot really helps on service when a wide angle is hit.

Most two-handers will go to one hand when they are REALLY stretched.  I mean
better some stab than none.

But overall, there are just too many situations out there where a slice is
better IMO for most players, namely a short low ball that you have to come
in.  With 2 hands, that is a tough shot to hit.  Deep leg bend, massive
topspin (or less power and flatter), whereas a chip works nicely.  On
occasion I get confused on what to hit, and because I play around so much I
often lose consistency but that's OK.  I find that a lot of 2 handers don't
like low slices because they simply don't get low enough with the proper
shoulder rotation on a consistent basis-in that situation I wanna be hitting
the backhand slice and feeding it to their backhand.

 
 
 

Backhand- Double handed vs Single handed

Post by Podibanda Kurup » Thu, 12 Dec 1996 04:00:00

Quote:




>>> I recently had tennis elbow and was advised to switch from single to a
>> double handed backhand. It does feel easier on the arm but I find that it
>> requires more coordination than a single handed grip. Can anybody tell the
>> relative merits and demerits of the two?
>>> Thanks. It will help me make up my mind once and for all.
>>> Ajay Malkani
> I have a one handed backhand and I believe it to be superior to a two handed
> backhand on the following counts:
> 1) Two handers have to release one of their hands sometimes when they have to
> stretch for a really difficult corner shot. This causes some discontinuity.
> One handers are always using one hand and thus stay better grooved.

[....]

I have followed this thread with a great deal  of interest because I'm
trying  to change to  a one-handed backhand  as well. I'd like to know
the  basic  mechanics of the one-hander.  Actually,  I'm curious about
only one aspect of the  backhand stroke.  Do you  take the racket back
with an open face, slightly-slanted as for a slice  - or, do you close
the face, so that when you meet the ball, the racket face is vertical?

I have watched several videos of  Pros and find  that majority of them
take the racket back with  an open face, and  let the top edge of  the
racket lead off as when you throw a frisbee. But this is very tricky -
to put it mildly.

If I keep the  racket face closed,  then I find that  when I  meet the
ball, the face is vertical and can produce  a good shot. However, if I
keep it open, I have to play games with my wrist to bring the racket
face vertical on impact.

What do you do?

--
-Podibanda Kuruppu