Wrist injury and back hand stroke

Wrist injury and back hand stroke

Post by Paul Eisen » Sat, 09 Mar 2002 14:50:34


I have a wrist injury that seemed to have resulted
from the one-handed backhand stroke.

Can any one share his or her experience about such
injuries ? Which parts of the stroke are the  most
injury prone ?

For me, personally, it appears to be the very end
of the finishing, after a top spin back hand shot.
Somehow the force was not naturally relieved. The racket
head seemed to still have the momentum to move toward
the right when it is already pointing toward the sky
in front of me. I might have used my wrist to stop
it right there.

When I watched the pros on TV, they seemed to finish
up the top spin back hand with the racket pointing
toward the sky too.

I consulted a pro at the local club, he seemed not sure
if the problem is at the end of the stroke.
I'd appreciate some thoughts from other players.

 
 
 

Wrist injury and back hand stroke

Post by Bill Smi » Sat, 09 Mar 2002 23:40:51

Do you live in California? If so, look me up.

If not, keep your wrist ABOVE your racket head throughout the stroke.
Generally, the radial movement of the forearm results in tennis elbow and
writst injuries.  If you are trying to accelerate the racket head to "catch up"
to hard shots on late hits, then you are likely to have pain result in the
wrist or elbow.

The arm is connected to the shoulder, so follow-through will bring the racket
to a position that looks as though the swing itself was directed upwards.  The
stroke's force should be directed parrallel to the ground and not have much
directed force upwards to create any topspin, IF YOU WANT TO REMAIN PAIN FREE.

Timing is everything.  Mishits can make for ouch hits.  Proper mechanics can do
wonders, but it only takes one mistake to pull one of those little tiny
ligaments or muscles in the wrist or elbow.

Go see a doctor, rehab with a therapist, don't play with injury, don't attempt
to endure pain, fix it.

Bill Smith
Tennis Professional USPTA, USRSA

 
 
 

Wrist injury and back hand stroke

Post by Predrag Rak » Sun, 10 Mar 2002 01:37:37

You should relax your forearm when you are hitting your
backhand.
I have no idea if this is what causes your injury,
but this is sound general advice.
10 years ago when I had a problem generating any power
and consistency on my backhand this was the advice I got.

Regards, Predrag

Quote:

> I have a wrist injury that seemed to have resulted
> from the one-handed backhand stroke.

> Can any one share his or her experience about such
> injuries ? Which parts of the stroke are the  most
> injury prone ?

> For me, personally, it appears to be the very end
> of the finishing, after a top spin back hand shot.
> Somehow the force was not naturally relieved. The racket
> head seemed to still have the momentum to move toward
> the right when it is already pointing toward the sky
> in front of me. I might have used my wrist to stop
> it right there.

> When I watched the pros on TV, they seemed to finish
> up the top spin back hand with the racket pointing
> toward the sky too.

> I consulted a pro at the local club, he seemed not sure
> if the problem is at the end of the stroke.
> I'd appreciate some thoughts from other players.


 
 
 

Wrist injury and back hand stroke

Post by Edward Ma » Sun, 10 Mar 2002 06:38:44



Quote:
> I have a wrist injury that seemed to have resulted
> from the one-handed backhand stroke.

> Can any one share his or her experience about such
> injuries ? Which parts of the stroke are the  most
> injury prone ?

> For me, personally, it appears to be the very end
> of the finishing, after a top spin back hand shot.
> Somehow the force was not naturally relieved. The racket
> head seemed to still have the momentum to move toward
> the right when it is already pointing toward the sky
> in front of me. I might have used my wrist to stop
> it right there.

> When I watched the pros on TV, they seemed to finish
> up the top spin back hand with the racket pointing
> toward the sky too.

> I consulted a pro at the local club, he seemed not sure
> if the problem is at the end of the stroke.
> I'd appreciate some thoughts from other players.

You aren't placing your thumb (lengthwise) along the handle, are you?

I've noticed a lot of intermediate players doing this. If this happens
to be the problem, make sure the thumb is gripping the handle along with
the rest of the fingers in a solid backhand grip.

Also, while hitting a topspin backhand, try to hit on the outside edge
of the ball. It's important to hit the one hander a little sooner (earlier)
than your forehand.

Ed

 
 
 

Wrist injury and back hand stroke

Post by Paul Eisen » Sun, 10 Mar 2002 14:24:05

Quote:

> Do you live in California? If so, look me up.

California is where tennis nuts like us should will be. I'll
keep this in mind.

Quote:

> If not, keep your wrist ABOVE your racket head throughout the stroke.
> Generally, the radial movement of the forearm results in tennis elbow and
> writst injuries.  If you are trying to accelerate the racket head to "catch up"
> to hard shots on late hits, then you are likely to have pain result in the
> wrist or elbow.

Yes, this made it worse.

Quote:

> The arm is connected to the shoulder, so follow-through will bring the racket
> to a position that looks as though the swing itself was directed upwards.  The
> stroke's force should be directed parrallel to the ground and not have much
> directed force upwards to create any topspin, IF YOU WANT TO REMAIN PAIN FREE.

This is probably what I should do, though it probably won't create the
kind of spin needed to let the ball drop near the net rusher's feet.

I wonder how players like Tommy Hass and Guga can still generate such
shots without injuries ?

I wish there are some wearable sensors on the wrist to record the force
exerted on the muscles or ligaments, as a way to show where/when the
risky situation arises..

Quote:

> Timing is everything.  Mishits can make for ouch hits.  Proper mechanics can do
> wonders, but it only takes one mistake to pull one of those little tiny
> ligaments or muscles in the wrist or elbow.

Interesting point. When diagnosing my problem, I only showed the
"normal" stroke, not the ones done under pressure..

Quote:

> Go see a doctor, rehab with a therapist, don't play with injury, don't attempt
> to endure pain, fix it.

Now I need to find a doctor who also plays tennis (preferably 4.5 or better),
so that he knows exactly what caused the problem and how to not let
it happen again.

Quote:

> Bill Smith
> Tennis Professional USPTA, USRSA

Thanks.
 
 
 

Wrist injury and back hand stroke

Post by Paul Eisen » Sun, 10 Mar 2002 14:33:16

Quote:

> You should relax your forearm when you are hitting your
> backhand.
> I have no idea if this is what causes your injury,
> but this is sound general advice.
> 10 years ago when I had a problem generating any power
> and consistency on my backhand this was the advice I got.

> Regards, Predrag

I suppose this is referring to the "flicking of wrist" kind
of motion. I don't do that, but sure will pay more attention.

Thanks for the advice.

 
 
 

Wrist injury and back hand stroke

Post by Paul Eisen » Sun, 10 Mar 2002 14:56:02

Quote:

> You aren't placing your thumb (lengthwise) along the handle, are you?

> I've noticed a lot of intermediate players doing this. If this happens
> to be the problem, make sure the thumb is gripping the handle along with
> the rest of the fingers in a solid backhand grip.

I stopped doing that a long time ago when I only sliced
the backhand shots. Still this is a good advice.

Quote:

> Also, while hitting a topspin backhand, try to hit on the outside edge
> of the ball. It's important to hit the one hander a little sooner (earlier)
> than your forehand.

> Ed

I'm not sure how to execute such shots properly. Maybe if the ball came
across  the court to the ad side, should one not lower the trunk as much
as the normal shot, to hit around the left side of the ball ?

Is there an explanation such shots make the wrist safer ?
Here is a general question for those two-handed backhanders,
is it less common to suffer injuries with the two-handed backhand
strokes ?

 
 
 

Wrist injury and back hand stroke

Post by Bill Smi » Sun, 10 Mar 2002 16:24:15

Quote:
>>>Here is a general question for those two-handed backhanders,

is it less common to suffer injuries with the two-handed backhand
strokes ?<<<

Two-handers often get "tennis elbow" in their left arm.  Medial side of elbow
becomes the target, as the stroke is now more left-handed forehand.  This would
be technically "Little League" elbow.  Lateral condyle would be tennis elbow.
However, pain is pain, whichever way you get it, strike it, spin it.

Bill Smith
Tennis Professional USPTA, USRSA

 
 
 

Wrist injury and back hand stroke

Post by Predrag Rak » Wed, 13 Mar 2002 02:20:19

No.
There should be no flicking of te wrist in 1-hbkhnd.
My wrist stays the same throughout the stroke, and only
through the contact with the ball there is a forearm
rotation around the wrist-elbow axis. I think of it as
my thumb lifting the racquet while the ***of the racquet
is the pivot point.
But the wrist stays stable.
Quote:


> > You should relax your forearm when you are hitting your
> > backhand.
> > I have no idea if this is what causes your injury,
> > but this is sound general advice.
> > 10 years ago when I had a problem generating any power
> > and consistency on my backhand this was the advice I got.

> > Regards, Predrag

> I suppose this is referring to the "flicking of wrist" kind
> of motion. I don't do that, but sure will pay more attention.

> Thanks for the advice.