Nadal calls for less hard court tennis. And in other news, bears shit in the woods :)

Nadal calls for less hard court tennis. And in other news, bears shit in the woods :)

Post by felange » Fri, 11 Jun 2010 10:18:03


Didn't he start this kind of things last time he was number 1? Back to the
top for only a few days and he is whingin' again already! :)
Nadal calls for less hard court tennis

No matter where Rafael Nadal goes at Queen's Club, there seems to be no
hiding place for the popular Spaniard.

His troublesome knees denied British fans a chance to see Nadal in full flow
last year as he ducked out of defending his titles at Queen's and Wimbledon.

Twelve months on and it seems that from the moment Nadal steps out of his
silver courtesy car at Queen's, he has a large group of fans snapping at his
heels.

Children are rewarded for their patience with a pat on their heads and in
case the seven-times grand slam champion had any doubts about his skills on
the tennis court, one little voice told him: "You're so good."

The Pied Piper of Queen's Club flashed his teeth at the observation but away
from the crowd, the smile disappeared as he grumbled about the prolonged
hardcourt season after making a winning comeback at Queen's on Wednesday.

"For me, the worst surface is hardcourt; not grass, not clay. Hardcourt is
very difficult, is very, very aggressive for the ankles, for the knees, for
the back, for everything," said the world number one, who was also forced to
retire injured during his Australian Open quarter-final this year.

Unfortunately for Nadal, apart from the two-month claycourt swing which
culminates with the French Open and the four-week run of grasscourt
tournaments, the rest of the tennis calendar is pre***ly made up of
hardcourt events.

Since maintaining hard surfaces is more cost-effective than clay and grass
courts -- which is why both the Australian and U.S. Open ditched the green
lawn from their venues -- it is unlikely Nadal's observation will carry any
weight.

"Seems like tennis is always moving to play more and more in these kind of
(hard) surfaces but my feeling is it's always a big mistake because the
grass is soft, the clay is soft, and the movements are more natural," said
Nadal, who in 2008 became the first man since Bjorn Borg in 1980 to complete
the French Open-Wimbledon double.

"On hard you (play) all the time very aggressive. That's bad for the knees
and for the ankles, for everything. I feel it worse when I play on hard and
than the rest of the surfaces."

 
 
 

Nadal calls for less hard court tennis. And in other news, bears shit in the woods :)

Post by Superdav » Fri, 11 Jun 2010 10:25:54

He's a ninny. A *** *** lah lah. Bull my ass. Spartan my balls.

The kid just can't take it. He's the real crybaby.

Quote:

>Didn't he start this kind of things last time he was number 1? Back to the
>top for only a few days and he is whingin' again already! :)

>Nadal calls for less hard court tennis

>No matter where Rafael Nadal goes at Queen's Club, there seems to be no
>hiding place for the popular Spaniard.

>His troublesome knees denied British fans a chance to see Nadal in full flow
>last year as he ducked out of defending his titles at Queen's and Wimbledon.

>Twelve months on and it seems that from the moment Nadal steps out of his
>silver courtesy car at Queen's, he has a large group of fans snapping at his
>heels.

>Children are rewarded for their patience with a pat on their heads and in
>case the seven-times grand slam champion had any doubts about his skills on
>the tennis court, one little voice told him: "You're so good."

>The Pied Piper of Queen's Club flashed his teeth at the observation but away
>from the crowd, the smile disappeared as he grumbled about the prolonged
>hardcourt season after making a winning comeback at Queen's on Wednesday.

>"For me, the worst surface is hardcourt; not grass, not clay. Hardcourt is
>very difficult, is very, very aggressive for the ankles, for the knees, for
>the back, for everything," said the world number one, who was also forced to
>retire injured during his Australian Open quarter-final this year.

>Unfortunately for Nadal, apart from the two-month claycourt swing which
>culminates with the French Open and the four-week run of grasscourt
>tournaments, the rest of the tennis calendar is pre***ly made up of
>hardcourt events.

>Since maintaining hard surfaces is more cost-effective than clay and grass
>courts -- which is why both the Australian and U.S. Open ditched the green
>lawn from their venues -- it is unlikely Nadal's observation will carry any
>weight.

>"Seems like tennis is always moving to play more and more in these kind of
>(hard) surfaces but my feeling is it's always a big mistake because the
>grass is soft, the clay is soft, and the movements are more natural," said
>Nadal, who in 2008 became the first man since Bjorn Borg in 1980 to complete
>the French Open-Wimbledon double.

>"On hard you (play) all the time very aggressive. That's bad for the knees
>and for the ankles, for everything. I feel it worse when I play on hard and
>than the rest of the surfaces."


 
 
 

Nadal calls for less hard court tennis. And in other news, bears shit in the woods :)

Post by Vari L. Cinick » Fri, 11 Jun 2010 10:48:04


Quote:
> Didn't he start this kind of things last time he was number 1? Back to
> the top for only a few days and he is whingin' again already! :)

> Nadal calls for less hard court tennis

Maybe he should adapt his game and adopt a style that taxes his joints a
lot less. He could take lessons from a former #1.

I guess it is far easier to whinge.

--
Cheers,

vc

 
 
 

Nadal calls for less hard court tennis. And in other news, bears shit in the woods :)

Post by Fan » Fri, 11 Jun 2010 14:10:18


Quote:
> Didn't he start this kind of things last time he was number 1? Back to the
> top for only a few days and he is whingin' again already! :)

> Nadal calls for less hard court tennis

Nadal should realize that hard courts are the least expensive to build
and maintain and they allows the greatest number of people to
participate in the game.
All my life, I paid to play tennis indoors only a couple of times
because there were free public courts where one could meet with people
and play tennis.
Nadals game is well suited to CC and he should concentrate on
establishing his legacy as a CC champion. He should not get any ideas
about doing the same thing on HC. The best thing for Nadal is if he
plays a restricted HC schedule, forgetting about #1 and winning as
many CC and GC tournaments as he can.
Nadal should not try to change ATP schedule. He should change his own
schedule. It would be to his benefit.
 
 
 

Nadal calls for less hard court tennis. And in other news, bears shit in the woods :)

Post by *skripti » Fri, 11 Jun 2010 14:14:27



Quote:

>> Didn't he start this kind of things last time he was number 1? Back to
>> the top for only a few days and he is whingin' again already! :)

>> Nadal calls for less hard court tennis

> Maybe he should adapt his game and adopt a style that taxes his joints a
> lot less. He could take lessons from a former #1.

> I guess it is far easier to whinge.

So you think his biggest motivation is to whinge, and that it has nothing to
do with the fact that there are three surfaces, unequally represented in the
clendar, one is like 10%, other 30% and the last one 60%.
 
 
 

Nadal calls for less hard court tennis. And in other news, bears shit in the woods :)

Post by reillo » Fri, 11 Jun 2010 14:38:08


Quote:

>> I guess it is far easier to whinge.

> So you think his biggest motivation is to whinge, and that it has nothing to
> do with the fact that there are three surfaces, unequally represented in the
> clendar, one is like 10%, other 30% and the last one 60%.

I'm not getting your point. You mean there ought to be more grass and
clay courts because Nadal's knees would be better off? That's kind of an
extreme accommodation for one player, don't you think?

Come to think of it, what other players have complained about or
actually experienced the physical adverse effects of playing on hardcourts?

You know, he doesn't have to do it. He could skip the hardcourt season
and take his monetary lumps or he could adjust his style in recognition
that playing the way he does on hardcourts hurts him.

Saying, though, that somehow "unequal representation" is implicated
ignores the fact that the events were there long before there was a
Nadal. He's extremely lucky that there are still clay courts around.

LNC

 
 
 

Nadal calls for less hard court tennis. And in other news, bears shit in the woods :)

Post by *skripti » Fri, 11 Jun 2010 14:41:48


Quote:


>>> I guess it is far easier to whinge.

>> So you think his biggest motivation is to whinge, and that it has nothing
>> to
>> do with the fact that there are three surfaces, unequally represented in
>> the
>> clendar, one is like 10%, other 30% and the last one 60%.

> I'm not getting your point. You mean there ought to be more grass and clay
> courts because Nadal's knees would be better off? That's kind of an
> extreme accommodation for one player, don't you think?

> Come to think of it, what other players have complained about or actually
> experienced the physical adverse effects of playing on hardcourts?

> You know, he doesn't have to do it. He could skip the hardcourt season and
> take his monetary lumps or he could adjust his style in recognition that
> playing the way he does on hardcourts hurts him.

> Saying, though, that somehow "unequal representation" is implicated
> ignores the fact that the events were there long before there was a Nadal.
> He's extremely lucky that there are still clay courts around.

> LNC

I am not getting your point. Someone decided to have 60% tour on HC.
Somone can decide not to have 60% tour on HC as well.

It's not curved in stone, you know?

 
 
 

Nadal calls for less hard court tennis. And in other news, bears shit in the woods :)

Post by Pedro Dia » Fri, 11 Jun 2010 14:59:59


Quote:

> > Didn't he start this kind of things last time he was number 1? Back to
> > the top for only a few days and he is whingin' again already! :)

> > Nadal calls for less hard court tennis

> Maybe he should adapt his game and adopt a style that taxes his joints a
> lot less. He could take lessons from a former #1.

> I guess it is far easier to whinge.

Or, alternatively, he could just continue "whingeing", since he is,
you know, *right* - clay is badly under-represented on Tour,
especially now that the top 100 has become almost completely non-
American..

But I'd never ask you to pass up a cheap shot for the sake of mere
fairness, so carry on as you were.

 
 
 

Nadal calls for less hard court tennis. And in other news, bears shit in the woods :)

Post by Pedro Dia » Fri, 11 Jun 2010 15:05:44


Quote:




> >>> I guess it is far easier to whinge.

> >> So you think his biggest motivation is to whinge, and that it has nothing
> >> to
> >> do with the fact that there are three surfaces, unequally represented in
> >> the
> >> clendar, one is like 10%, other 30% and the last one 60%.

> > I'm not getting your point. You mean there ought to be more grass and clay
> > courts because Nadal's knees would be better off? That's kind of an
> > extreme accommodation for one player, don't you think?

> > Come to think of it, what other players have complained about or actually
> > experienced the physical adverse effects of playing on hardcourts?

> > You know, he doesn't have to do it. He could skip the hardcourt season and
> > take his monetary lumps or he could adjust his style in recognition that
> > playing the way he does on hardcourts hurts him.

> > Saying, though, that somehow "unequal representation" is implicated
> > ignores the fact that the events were there long before there was a Nadal.
> > He's extremely lucky that there are still clay courts around.

> > LNC

> I am not getting your point. Someone decided to have 60% tour on HC.
> Somone can decide not to have 60% tour on HC as well.

> It's not curved in stone, you know?

Or straighted in marble, for that matter.

It's not quite that simple: you have three constituencies to please:
players, who would probably be okay with an increase in clay play;
tournaments, which will resist any change: you'd be dropping
tournaments that exist now, and can argue for the status quo, in favor
of tournaments that don't yet exist, and so are less articulate; and
fans/spectators/audience, which are tricky: I'll guess that a fairly
large majority plays on hardcourt, and prefers to watch pros playing
on it, but might be amenable to change.

 
 
 

Nadal calls for less hard court tennis. And in other news, bears shit in the woods :)

Post by *skripti » Fri, 11 Jun 2010 16:00:57



Quote:




> >>> I guess it is far easier to whinge.

> >> So you think his biggest motivation is to whinge, and that it has
> >> nothing
> >> to
> >> do with the fact that there are three surfaces, unequally represented
> >> in
> >> the
> >> clendar, one is like 10%, other 30% and the last one 60%.

> > I'm not getting your point. You mean there ought to be more grass and
> > clay
> > courts because Nadal's knees would be better off? That's kind of an
> > extreme accommodation for one player, don't you think?

> > Come to think of it, what other players have complained about or
> > actually
> > experienced the physical adverse effects of playing on hardcourts?

> > You know, he doesn't have to do it. He could skip the hardcourt season
> > and
> > take his monetary lumps or he could adjust his style in recognition that
> > playing the way he does on hardcourts hurts him.

> > Saying, though, that somehow "unequal representation" is implicated
> > ignores the fact that the events were there long before there was a
> > Nadal.
> > He's extremely lucky that there are still clay courts around.

> > LNC

> I am not getting your point. Someone decided to have 60% tour on HC.
> Somone can decide not to have 60% tour on HC as well.

> It's not curved in stone, you know?
>Or straighted in marble, for that matter.
>It's not quite that simple: you have three constituencies to please:
>players, who would probably be okay with an increase in clay play;
>tournaments, which will resist any change: you'd be dropping
>tournaments that exist now, and can argue for the status quo, in favor
>of tournaments that don't yet exist, and so are less articulate; and
>fans/spectators/audience, which are tricky: I'll guess that a fairly
>large majority plays on hardcourt, and prefers to watch pros playing
>on it, but might be amenable to change.

I am not rasing that issue, someone like Nadal certainly knows better what's
possible to do, to change, and what isn't.
I am also aware of the difficulties regarding tournaments, etc.

But why attack him, or suggest he has some his own agenda (even if he has,
you must be aware he won't play long enough to enjoy those changes even if
they happen)
He's basically right, three surfaces, unequally represented.

I don' think he said there should be a lot more clay, clay is already on
about 30%. I think he's right in saying that there are too many HC events.
Nobody can disagree with that, at least when you look at percentages.
10-30-60. Personally I would like to see more grass, less HC.

For high profile events, such as slams, or MS events, I think it's laughable
to cite "costs in maintanance" as the reason of having HC susrface instead
of grass or clay. Are FO and Wimbledon on the verge of bankrupcy because
they have to maintain their courts?

Shifting AO back to grass, and perhaps making Miami a green claycourt event
would give some balance, but of course, lot of problems...what about all
those Gulf states tune-ups before AO, what about Indian Wells..etc.

 
 
 

Nadal calls for less hard court tennis. And in other news, bears shit in the woods :)

Post by kaennorsin » Fri, 11 Jun 2010 16:18:11


Quote:


> > > Didn't he start this kind of things last time he was number 1? Back to
> > > the top for only a few days and he is whingin' again already! :)

> > > Nadal calls for less hard court tennis

> > Maybe he should adapt his game and adopt a style that taxes his joints a
> > lot less. He could take lessons from a former #1.

> > I guess it is far easier to whinge.

> Or, alternatively, he could just continue "whingeing", since he is,
> you know, *right* - clay is badly under-represented on Tour,
> especially now that the top 100 has become almost completely non-
> American..

I resent your reasoning here. I think it's morally and fundamentally
wrong to focus on which type of play succeeds and alter surface spread
and overall conditions to their advantage. You should ask yourself
"why does it succeed today?" Well, because they slowed surface speeds
down across the board - which favoured their style more than any other
in the first place.

Instead, the ATP should look at a more fairly balanced spread of
surfaces throughout the calender year to diversify playing styles.
This also enhances players' longevity and benefit the sport in the
long run. If a chunk of the hard and perhaps a small part of the clay
season can be substituted by grass and carpet tennis benefits on the
long run.

Tennis will not benefit if Rafa's career is cut short because he re-
injures himself on hard courts... However, he's responsible for his
own actions and how he approaches his career. Following his advice -
or any other top player - as to how to alter conditions is the worst
thing a government body can do. Saying a lot of players are successful
on claycourts so we have to expand the clay season is something
politicians would do. Never looking beyond the immediate consequences
and long term negative implications. This is like asking the bankers
responsible for leveraging up what the cause of the problem was and
following their advice to alter rules and regulations. Of course
they're going to say "Save us, save us! If we go down the whole system
goes down! We're too big to fail... Alter the rules to benefit us!".

 
 
 

Nadal calls for less hard court tennis. And in other news, bears shit in the woods :)

Post by topspi » Fri, 11 Jun 2010 17:51:01


Quote:







> > >>> I guess it is far easier to whinge.

> > >> So you think his biggest motivation is to whinge, and that it has
> > >> nothing
> > >> to
> > >> do with the fact that there are three surfaces, unequally represented
> > >> in
> > >> the
> > >> clendar, one is like 10%, other 30% and the last one 60%.

> > > I'm not getting your point. You mean there ought to be more grass and
> > > clay
> > > courts because Nadal's knees would be better off? That's kind of an
> > > extreme accommodation for one player, don't you think?

> > > Come to think of it, what other players have complained about or
> > > actually
> > > experienced the physical adverse effects of playing on hardcourts?

> > > You know, he doesn't have to do it. He could skip the hardcourt season
> > > and
> > > take his monetary lumps or he could adjust his style in recognition that
> > > playing the way he does on hardcourts hurts him.

> > > Saying, though, that somehow "unequal representation" is implicated
> > > ignores the fact that the events were there long before there was a
> > > Nadal.
> > > He's extremely lucky that there are still clay courts around.

> > > LNC

> > I am not getting your point. Someone decided to have 60% tour on HC.
> > Somone can decide not to have 60% tour on HC as well.

> > It's not curved in stone, you know?
> >Or straighted in marble, for that matter.
> >It's not quite that simple: you have three constituencies to please:
> >players, who would probably be okay with an increase in clay play;
> >tournaments, which will resist any change: you'd be dropping
> >tournaments that exist now, and can argue for the status quo, in favor
> >of tournaments that don't yet exist, and so are less articulate; and
> >fans/spectators/audience, which are tricky: I'll guess that a fairly
> >large majority plays on hardcourt, and prefers to watch pros playing
> >on it, but might be amenable to change.

> I am not rasing that issue, someone like Nadal certainly knows better what's
> possible to do, to change, and what isn't.
> I am also aware of the difficulties regarding tournaments, etc.

> But why attack him, or suggest he has some his own agenda (even if he has,
> you must be aware he won't play long enough to enjoy those changes even if
> they happen)
> He's basically right, three surfaces, unequally represented.

> I don' think he said there should be a lot more clay, clay is already on
> about 30%. I think he's right in saying that there are too many HC events.
> Nobody can disagree with that, at least when you look at percentages.
> 10-30-60. Personally I would like to see more grass, less HC.

> For high profile events, such as slams, or MS events, I think it's laughable
> to cite "costs in maintanance" as the reason of having HC susrface instead
> of grass or clay. Are FO and Wimbledon on the verge of bankrupcy because
> they have to maintain their courts?

> Shifting AO back to grass, and perhaps making Miami a green claycourt event
> would give some balance, but of course, lot of problems...what about all
> those Gulf states tune-ups before AO, what about Indian Wells..etc.- Hide quoted text -

> - Show quoted text -

The problem is it isn't just the slams that would have to change, the
tournaments leading up to them would also have to change, to give
players the necessary experience.

I am amazed that the shoe manufacturer's haven't come up with a better
shoe for the pros on HC. Why haven't they designed a shoe with a sole
which will allow some slip, and a suspension which eases the joints?
It might cost a lot, but it is the players' business, so they should
be prepared to pay more for a specialised piece of equipment.

It is a bit like a car tyre. That is the most critical connection
between the vehicle and the road.

 
 
 

Nadal calls for less hard court tennis. And in other news, bears shit in the woods :)

Post by tuan » Fri, 11 Jun 2010 17:58:08

Quote:

> I am amazed that the shoe manufacturer's haven't come up with a better
> shoe for the pros on HC. Why haven't they designed a shoe with a sole
> which will allow some slip, and a suspension which eases the joints?
> It might cost a lot, but it is the players' business, so they should
> be prepared to pay more for a specialised piece of equipment.

:) A shoe "with some slip" will cause the players to stop and reverse
less quickly, and the wearer of those shoes will be at a disadvantage.
Basically, on hard courts, you (or at least players with Nadal's style)
are trading in your tendons for cups. If you want to lose, there are
cheaper ways than buying special slipping shoes.
 
 
 

Nadal calls for less hard court tennis. And in other news, bears shit in the woods :)

Post by Superdav » Fri, 11 Jun 2010 18:21:06



Quote:








>> > >>> I guess it is far easier to whinge.

>> > >> So you think his biggest motivation is to whinge, and that it has
>> > >> nothing
>> > >> to
>> > >> do with the fact that there are three surfaces, unequally represented
>> > >> in
>> > >> the
>> > >> clendar, one is like 10%, other 30% and the last one 60%.

>> > > I'm not getting your point. You mean there ought to be more grass and
>> > > clay
>> > > courts because Nadal's knees would be better off? That's kind of an
>> > > extreme accommodation for one player, don't you think?

>> > > Come to think of it, what other players have complained about or
>> > > actually
>> > > experienced the physical adverse effects of playing on hardcourts?

>> > > You know, he doesn't have to do it. He could skip the hardcourt season
>> > > and
>> > > take his monetary lumps or he could adjust his style in recognition that
>> > > playing the way he does on hardcourts hurts him.

>> > > Saying, though, that somehow "unequal representation" is implicated
>> > > ignores the fact that the events were there long before there was a
>> > > Nadal.
>> > > He's extremely lucky that there are still clay courts around.

>> > > LNC

>> > I am not getting your point. Someone decided to have 60% tour on HC.
>> > Somone can decide not to have 60% tour on HC as well.

>> > It's not curved in stone, you know?
>> >Or straighted in marble, for that matter.
>> >It's not quite that simple: you have three constituencies to please:
>> >players, who would probably be okay with an increase in clay play;
>> >tournaments, which will resist any change: you'd be dropping
>> >tournaments that exist now, and can argue for the status quo, in favor
>> >of tournaments that don't yet exist, and so are less articulate; and
>> >fans/spectators/audience, which are tricky: I'll guess that a fairly
>> >large majority plays on hardcourt, and prefers to watch pros playing
>> >on it, but might be amenable to change.

>> I am not rasing that issue, someone like Nadal certainly knows better what's
>> possible to do, to change, and what isn't.
>> I am also aware of the difficulties regarding tournaments, etc.

>> But why attack him, or suggest he has some his own agenda (even if he has,
>> you must be aware he won't play long enough to enjoy those changes even if
>> they happen)
>> He's basically right, three surfaces, unequally represented.

>> I don' think he said there should be a lot more clay, clay is already on
>> about 30%. I think he's right in saying that there are too many HC events.
>> Nobody can disagree with that, at least when you look at percentages.
>> 10-30-60. Personally I would like to see more grass, less HC.

>> For high profile events, such as slams, or MS events, I think it's laughable
>> to cite "costs in maintanance" as the reason of having HC susrface instead
>> of grass or clay. Are FO and Wimbledon on the verge of bankrupcy because
>> they have to maintain their courts?

>> Shifting AO back to grass, and perhaps making Miami a green claycourt event
>> would give some balance, but of course, lot of problems...what about all
>> those Gulf states tune-ups before AO, what about Indian Wells..etc.- Hide quoted text -

>> - Show quoted text -

>The problem is it isn't just the slams that would have to change, the
>tournaments leading up to them would also have to change, to give
>players the necessary experience.

>I am amazed that the shoe manufacturer's haven't come up with a better
>shoe for the pros on HC. Why haven't they designed a shoe with a sole
>which will allow some slip, and a suspension which eases the joints?
>It might cost a lot, but it is the players' business, so they should
>be prepared to pay more for a specialised piece of equipment.

>It is a bit like a car tyre. That is the most critical connection
>between the vehicle and the road.

Nobody *** but rafa so *** him. let him eat dirt.
 
 
 

Nadal calls for less hard court tennis. And in other news, bears shit in the woods :)

Post by miss » Fri, 11 Jun 2010 19:44:00


Quote:
> Didn't he start this kind of things last time he was number 1? Back to the
> top for only a few days and he is whingin' again already! :)

> Nadal calls for less hard court tennis

> No matter where Rafael Nadal goes at Queen's Club, there seems to be no
> hiding place for the popular Spaniard.

> His troublesome knees denied British fans a chance to see Nadal in full flow
> last year as he ducked out of defending his titles at Queen's and Wimbledon.

> Twelve months on and it seems that from the moment Nadal steps out of his
> silver courtesy car at Queen's, he has a large group of fans snapping at his
> heels.

> Children are rewarded for their patience with a pat on their heads and in
> case the seven-times grand slam champion had any doubts about his skills on
> the tennis court, one little voice told him: "You're so good."

> The Pied Piper of Queen's Club flashed his teeth at the observation but away
> from the crowd, the smile disappeared as he grumbled about the prolonged
> hardcourt season after making a winning comeback at Queen's on Wednesday.

> "For me, the worst surface is hardcourt; not grass, not clay. Hardcourt is
> very difficult, is very, very aggressive for the ankles, for the knees, for
> the back, for everything," said the world number one, who was also forced to
> retire injured during his Australian Open quarter-final this year.

> Unfortunately for Nadal, apart from the two-month claycourt swing which
> culminates with the French Open and the four-week run of grasscourt
> tournaments, the rest of the tennis calendar is pre***ly made up of
> hardcourt events.

> Since maintaining hard surfaces is more cost-effective than clay and grass
> courts -- which is why both the Australian and U.S. Open ditched the green
> lawn from their venues -- it is unlikely Nadal's observation will carry any
> weight.

> "Seems like tennis is always moving to play more and more in these kind of
> (hard) surfaces but my feeling is it's always a big mistake because the
> grass is soft, the clay is soft, and the movements are more natural," said
> Nadal, who in 2008 became the first man since Bjorn Borg in 1980 to complete
> the French Open-Wimbledon double.

> "On hard you (play) all the time very aggressive. That's bad for the knees
> and for the ankles, for everything. I feel it worse when I play on hard and
> than the rest of the surfaces."

Hes right .

Just look at the injuries oflk have now compared to even 10 yrs ago
i.e. theres nearly always someone now in the top 10 injuried if not
2 , so i the best are getting injuried routinetly what does that tell
you ?

Its not so much the courts though , I just think Nadal has prob
reached the boundaries of whats physically possible with a human
body , and thats why its breaking down - although hard def doesnt
help.

they need to really upgrade the body or find ways to protect joints .
tendons etc from being strained , damaged other than waiting till they
snap , tear or become unstable and then ( liek sharapova ) spend the
rest of their careers on sidelines .

It all comes back to same ol greed , exploitation and lack of progress
in medicine .

I dont understand how big comapnies like NIke are not pushing to get
something done when so many sports are at sake through injuries .

If Fed or Nadal were ***ed like Sharapova , with their shoudlers for
example the sport would be hurt tremendously , who the hell is going
to pay to watch monfils or some other hack like Murray , its not like
theirs an abundanceo of characters either other than the token ***
like Djoker , that nobody likes.