running start serve a proper serve?

running start serve a proper serve?

Post by Stephen Barnar » Tue, 20 Aug 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

> All the talk on "footwork" of serving got me thinking.  Is it legal to
> take a running start when serving (like in volleyball)?  If so, someone
> like Michael Jordan can theoretically be hitting the ball close to 18 ft
> in the air (4 ft. jump + body height + arm length + racket length).  Even
> worse, as far as I know, there is no rule about where you can hit the
> ball, only that the foot cannot touch the ground inside the court before
> hitting the ball (please don't flame me if that is wrong), so one can toss
> the ball way into the court, and hit it while still in the air.

> --


I think you're right. Mike.  You didn't used to be right, but I think
you're right under the current rules.

However, if someone tried this "Michael Jordan" technique then I think
they'd be dog meat.  The returner would just pass them because they
wouldn't be able to recover with a split step to react to the pass.

Then again, who really knows?  We'll see.

                Steve Barnard

 
 
 

running start serve a proper serve?

Post by Jordan Chodor » Tue, 20 Aug 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

>All the talk on "footwork" of serving got me thinking.  Is it legal to
>take a running start when serving (like in volleyball)?  If so, someone

-----> Nope.  That's a footfault.  

Quote:
>like Michael Jordan can theoretically be hitting the ball close to 18 ft
>in the air (4 ft. jump + body height + arm length + racket length).  Even
>worse, as far as I know, there is no rule about where you can hit the
>ball, only that the foot cannot touch the ground inside the court before
>hitting the ball (please don't flame me if that is wrong), so one can toss
>the ball way into the court, and hit it while still in the air.

>--


-----> You may toss the ball as far into the court as you can, but no
running start.

-- Jordan

 
 
 

running start serve a proper serve?

Post by Mike » Tue, 20 Aug 1996 04:00:00

All the talk on "footwork" of serving got me thinking.  Is it legal to
take a running start when serving (like in volleyball)?  If so, someone
like Michael Jordan can theoretically be hitting the ball close to 18 ft
in the air (4 ft. jump + body height + arm length + racket length).  Even
worse, as far as I know, there is no rule about where you can hit the
ball, only that the foot cannot touch the ground inside the court before
hitting the ball (please don't flame me if that is wrong), so one can toss
the ball way into the court, and hit it while still in the air.

--


 
 
 

running start serve a proper serve?

Post by Dean Cash » Wed, 21 Aug 1996 04:00:00

Quote:

>All the talk on "footwork" of serving got me thinking.  Is it legal to
>take a running start when serving (like in volleyball)?  If so, someone
>like Michael Jordan can theoretically be hitting the ball close to 18 ft
>in the air (4 ft. jump + body height + arm length + racket length).  Even
>worse, as far as I know, there is no rule about where you can hit the
>ball, only that the foot cannot touch the ground inside the court before
>hitting the ball (please don't flame me if that is wrong), so one can toss
>the ball way into the court, and hit it while still in the air.

The rules of tennis prohibit running into the serve:

RULE 8
Foot Fault

(a) The Server shall throughout the delivery of the service:

(i) Not change his position by walking or running. The Server shall
not by slight movements of the feet which do not materially affect the
location originally taken up by him, be deemed "to change his position
by walking or running".

There's a man at my club who takes a running start on his serve (he
stands maybe 8-10 feet back, runs to the baseline as he tosses the
ball, and serves as he's leaping into the court).  He also steps INTO
the court on every serve -- probably hard to regulate all that motion.
No one ever calls it on him, of course, and he's been doing this
forever.

Dean

 
 
 

running start serve a proper serve?

Post by Stephen Barnar » Thu, 22 Aug 1996 04:00:00

Quote:



> > >All the talk on "footwork" of serving got me thinking.  Is it legal to
> > >take a running start when serving (like in volleyball)?  If so, someone
> > >like Michael Jordan can theoretically be hitting the ball close to 18 ft
> > >in the air (4 ft. jump + body height + arm length + racket length).  Even
> > >worse, as far as I know, there is no rule about where you can hit the
> > >ball, only that the foot cannot touch the ground inside the court before
> > >hitting the ball (please don't flame me if that is wrong), so one can toss
> > >the ball way into the court, and hit it while still in the air.

> > The rules of tennis prohibit running into the serve:

> > RULE 8
> > Foot Fault

> > (a) The Server shall throughout the delivery of the service:

> > (i) Not change his position by walking or running. The Server shall
> > not by slight movements of the feet which do not materially affect the
> > location originally taken up by him, be deemed "to change his position
> > by walking or running".

> > There's a man at my club who takes a running start on his serve (he
> > stands maybe 8-10 feet back, runs to the baseline as he tosses the
> > ball, and serves as he's leaping into the court).  He also steps INTO
> > the court on every serve -- probably hard to regulate all that motion.
> > No one ever calls it on him, of course, and he's been doing this
> > forever.

> > Dean

>  That is the one thing I have never understood; why call everything
> else on the other player and not foot faults??? There is some
> unwritten rule at our club that no one ever calls foot faults. I
> mean, we had a club tourney and I was sitting there with the club
> pro watching this guy serve; he stepped right on the line and then
> served. I looked over at the pro and said, "foot fault?" -- he says,
> "no one is EVER going to call those here".

>  I've got used to it of course. What I do is wait until an important
> game and just yell across the net something like, "watch those foot
> faults now", or "OK, no foot faults this game". Of course I do this
> well before the server is getting ready so as not to interfere, yet
> to let him/her know I know what they know (or don't know) they are
> doing.

>  But I think if someone was *running* up to the and across the
> service line I would say something to let them know that the rules
> of tennis state you cannot do that.

> bc

I think at least 80% of recreational players foot-fault.  (*I* don't, of
course!)  People usually aren't even aware that they are foot-faulting.  
No one ever calls them, and I think that's best.  For one thing, it's
nearly impossible to see a foot fault from the opposite baseline,
assuming that you're concentrating on the return.  In doubles it would
be more reasonable, but that brings me to my second point.  Calling a
foot fault just isn't very nice.

If I see that a *really* good friend is foot-faulting I *might* mention
it to him over a beer when the tennis is over.  Then again, depending on
his personality, I might not.

        Steve Barnard

 
 
 

running start serve a proper serve?

Post by Jordan Chodor » Thu, 22 Aug 1996 04:00:00



Quote:



>> > >All the talk on "footwork" of serving got me thinking.  Is it legal to
>> > >take a running start when serving (like in volleyball)?  If so, someone
>> > >like Michael Jordan can theoretically be hitting the ball close to 18 ft
>> > >in the air (4 ft. jump + body height + arm length + racket length).  Even
>> > >worse, as far as I know, there is no rule about where you can hit the
>> > >ball, only that the foot cannot touch the ground inside the court before
>> > >hitting the ball (please don't flame me if that is wrong), so one can toss
>> > >the ball way into the court, and hit it while still in the air.

>> > The rules of tennis prohibit running into the serve:

>> > RULE 8
>> > Foot Fault

>> > (a) The Server shall throughout the delivery of the service:

>> > (i) Not change his position by walking or running. The Server shall
>> > not by slight movements of the feet which do not materially affect the
>> > location originally taken up by him, be deemed "to change his position
>> > by walking or running".

>> > There's a man at my club who takes a running start on his serve (he
>> > stands maybe 8-10 feet back, runs to the baseline as he tosses the
>> > ball, and serves as he's leaping into the court).  He also steps INTO
>> > the court on every serve -- probably hard to regulate all that motion.
>> > No one ever calls it on him, of course, and he's been doing this
>> > forever.

>> > Dean

>>  That is the one thing I have never understood; why call everything
>> else on the other player and not foot faults??? There is some
>> unwritten rule at our club that no one ever calls foot faults. I
>> mean, we had a club tourney and I was sitting there with the club
>> pro watching this guy serve; he stepped right on the line and then
>> served. I looked over at the pro and said, "foot fault?" -- he says,
>> "no one is EVER going to call those here".

>>  I've got used to it of course. What I do is wait until an important
>> game and just yell across the net something like, "watch those foot
>> faults now", or "OK, no foot faults this game". Of course I do this
>> well before the server is getting ready so as not to interfere, yet
>> to let him/her know I know what they know (or don't know) they are
>> doing.

>>  But I think if someone was *running* up to the and across the
>> service line I would say something to let them know that the rules
>> of tennis state you cannot do that.

>> bc

>I think at least 80% of recreational players foot-fault.  (*I* don't, of
>course!)  People usually aren't even aware that they are foot-faulting.  
>No one ever calls them, and I think that's best.  For one thing, it's
>nearly impossible to see a foot fault from the opposite baseline,
>assuming that you're concentrating on the return.  In doubles it would
>be more reasonable, but that brings me to my second point.  Calling a
>foot fault just isn't very nice.

>If I see that a *really* good friend is foot-faulting I *might* mention
>it to him over a beer when the tennis is over.  Then again, depending on
>his personality, I might not.

>    Steve Barnard

-----> No offense, Steve, but I think you're wrong about basically
everything.  :)

-- Jordan

 
 
 

running start serve a proper serve?

Post by Bruce Christofferso » Thu, 22 Aug 1996 04:00:00

Quote:


> >All the talk on "footwork" of serving got me thinking.  Is it legal to
> >take a running start when serving (like in volleyball)?  If so, someone
> >like Michael Jordan can theoretically be hitting the ball close to 18 ft
> >in the air (4 ft. jump + body height + arm length + racket length).  Even
> >worse, as far as I know, there is no rule about where you can hit the
> >ball, only that the foot cannot touch the ground inside the court before
> >hitting the ball (please don't flame me if that is wrong), so one can toss
> >the ball way into the court, and hit it while still in the air.

> The rules of tennis prohibit running into the serve:

> RULE 8
> Foot Fault

> (a) The Server shall throughout the delivery of the service:

> (i) Not change his position by walking or running. The Server shall
> not by slight movements of the feet which do not materially affect the
> location originally taken up by him, be deemed "to change his position
> by walking or running".

> There's a man at my club who takes a running start on his serve (he
> stands maybe 8-10 feet back, runs to the baseline as he tosses the
> ball, and serves as he's leaping into the court).  He also steps INTO
> the court on every serve -- probably hard to regulate all that motion.
> No one ever calls it on him, of course, and he's been doing this
> forever.

> Dean


 That is the one thing I have never understood; why call everything
else on the other player and not foot faults??? There is some
unwritten rule at our club that no one ever calls foot faults. I
mean, we had a club tourney and I was sitting there with the club
pro watching this guy serve; he stepped right on the line and then
served. I looked over at the pro and said, "foot fault?" -- he says,
"no one is EVER going to call those here".

 I've got used to it of course. What I do is wait until an important
game and just yell across the net something like, "watch those foot
faults now", or "OK, no foot faults this game". Of course I do this
well before the server is getting ready so as not to interfere, yet
to let him/her know I know what they know (or don't know) they are
doing.

 But I think if someone was *running* up to the and across the
service line I would say something to let them know that the rules
of tennis state you cannot do that.

bc

 
 
 

running start serve a proper serve?

Post by Stephen Barnar » Fri, 23 Aug 1996 04:00:00

Quote:



> >I think at least 80% of recreational players foot-fault.  (*I* don't, of
> >course!)  People usually aren't even aware that they are foot-faulting.
> >No one ever calls them, and I think that's best.  For one thing, it's
> >nearly impossible to see a foot fault from the opposite baseline,
> >assuming that you're concentrating on the return.  In doubles it would
> >be more reasonable, but that brings me to my second point.  Calling a
> >foot fault just isn't very nice.

> >If I see that a *really* good friend is foot-faulting I *might* mention
> >it to him over a beer when the tennis is over.  Then again, depending on
> >his personality, I might not.

> >       Steve Barnard

> -----> No offense, Steve, but I think you're wrong about basically
> everything.  :)

> -- Jordan

No offense taken. :-)

I probably should have mentioned that I wasn't talking about tournaments
-- just friendly matches.  A lot of people (me included) rarely play in
tournaments.

        Steve Barnard

 
 
 

running start serve a proper serve?

Post by Graham Shevli » Wed, 28 Aug 1996 04:00:00

Quote:

>There's a man at my club who takes a running start on his serve (he
>stands maybe 8-10 feet back, runs to the baseline as he tosses the
>ball, and serves as he's leaping into the court).  He also steps INTO
>the court on every serve -- probably hard to regulate all that motion.
>No one ever calls it on him, of course, and he's been doing this
>forever.

And he will probably continue to do it. At my club, I watched a lot of
the players serving one evening. I estimate that 40-50% were
foot-faulting most of the time. This part of the laws is poorly
understood by a lot of players. They see the top guys seemingly
landing inside the court after striking the ball, not noticing that at
the moment of ball contact, they have both feet in the air and are
therefore not violating the law. So they try to do this - but they
don't have the upwards thrust to meet the ball that good servers have,
and therefore they essentially walk into the court as they hit the
ball.
Another factor to bear in mind is that a receiver cannot easily see
the server's baseline from his baseline; thus calling a foot fault is
a lot more difficult than, say, calling a long serve. Foot faults can
really only be seen accurately from the server's side of the net.
 
 
 

running start serve a proper serve?

Post by hesco51.. » Wed, 15 Jan 1997 04:00:00

ESPN chose to use his entire hour of AO coverage Monday at 1PM to Mary
Pierce Elena Likhovtseva match instead of the Kournikova Coetzer match.
Mary looks terrific in that *** top.I hope she will show us more by
winnig more matches at the AO.
Hernando

 
 
 

running start serve a proper serve?

Post by David Ho » Wed, 15 Jan 1997 04:00:00

Quote:

> ESPN chose to use his entire hour of AO coverage Monday at 1PM to Mary
> Pierce Elena Likhovtseva match instead of the Kournikova Coetzer match.
> Mary looks terrific in that *** top.I hope she will show us more by
> winnig more matches at the AO.

Right. I'm sure that the neckline is going to drop an extra inch every
match she wins.

--
Mike Hoye

(Damn, I'm getting tired or this kind of thing.)

 
 
 

running start serve a proper serve?

Post by Glenn Le » Thu, 16 Jan 1997 04:00:00

Hey, beauty sells!!!
Glenn
=====================================================================

Quote:
> ESPN chose to use his entire hour of AO coverage Monday at 1PM to Mary
> Pierce Elena Likhovtseva match instead of the Kournikova Coetzer match.
> Mary looks terrific in that *** top.I hope she will show us more by
> winnig more matches at the AO.
> Hernando

 
 
 

running start serve a proper serve?

Post by Marsha Stro » Mon, 27 Jan 1997 04:00:00



Quote:

>(Damn, I'm getting tired or this kind of thing.)

You and me both, Mike. The sexism and lookism in the group is
beginning to get to me - I glad at least one other person shares my
feelings.

Marsha