Backhands: one hand vs. two

Backhands: one hand vs. two

Post by Timmer - Tim Kaufm » Wed, 08 Dec 1993 10:25:25


Quote:


>>Interesting that a couple people have suggested that a one-handed
>>backhand is more powerful than a two-handed backhand.  I don't think
>>that the length of the stroke has anything to do with power.  The ball
>>is on the strings for such a short time that power is all a matter of
>>force at the point of impact, not follow-through.

>You may not think that the length of the stroke has anything to do with power,
>but you are wrong. The longer you can keep the ball on the strings the more
>power you deliver. A long follow through is critical to impart the most power
>on the ball. (As well as hitting it flat and in the middle of the racquet).

I'm not convinced the ball is on the strings longer.  BUT, it seems
to me that the longer stroke, at the acceleration your arm is
capable of, gives you more time to increase racket head velocity (on
the one-handed stroke).  Essentially what another poster said about
follow-through--it doesn't do anything itself, but is evidence that
there was some amount of racket speed at impact.

HOWEVER, the extra strength with two hands should mean higher
acceleration (I mean, the ability to develop a similar velocity in a
shorter distance).  In other words, jackrabbit starts and stops.  So
I wouldn't even hazard a guess which one had more power.  For me
personally, I think I lack the upper body flexibility to get the
same power from two hands.

--
Timmer

 
 
 

Backhands: one hand vs. two

Post by Timmer - Tim Kaufm » Wed, 08 Dec 1993 10:30:37

Quote:


>Top 8 players(ATP Championship)

>Sampras    1 hander
>Stich      1 hander
>Courier    2 hander
>Bruguera   2 hander
>Ivanisevic 2 hander <-----
>Medvedev   2 hander       |
>Chang      2 hander       |
>Edberg     1 hander       |
>                          |

           Wouldn't Goran be described as AC/DC?
           (As far as backhands are concerned, of course.)

Quote:
>On the women side, virtually almost all of the top 20 players have 2 handed
>backhands except Graf, Conchita Martinez, Sukova and Martina.

And almost nobody serves and volleys.

--
Timmer

 
 
 

Backhands: one hand vs. two

Post by Raza Ba » Thu, 09 Dec 1993 10:39:27


(Timmer - Tim Kaufman) writes:
Quote:


(Stanford Guillory) writes:

> >Top 8 players(ATP Championship)

> >Sampras    1 hander
> >Stich      1 hander
> >Courier    2 hander
> >Bruguera   2 hander
> >Ivanisevic 2 hander <-----
> >Medvedev   2 hander       |
> >Chang      2 hander       |
> >Edberg     1 hander       |
> >                          |
>            Wouldn't Goran be described as AC/DC?
>            (As far as backhands are concerned, of course.)

> >On the women side, virtually almost all of the top 20 players have 2  
handed
> >backhands except Graf, Conchita Martinez, Sukova and Martina.
>      You forgot Sabatini whose one hander is probably the best one in                                          
the woman's game.
> And almost nobody serves and volleys.

> --
> Timmer


 
 
 

Backhands: one hand vs. two

Post by <U58.. » Thu, 09 Dec 1993 16:04:01


Quote:


>(Timmer - Tim Kaufman) writes:


>(Stanford Guillory) writes:

>> >On the women side, virtually almost all of the top 20 players have 2
>handed
>> >backhands except Graf, Conchita Martinez, Sukova and Martina.
>>      You forgot Sabatini whose one hander is probably the best one in
>the woman's game.

And Tauziat, Novotna, & Garrison...so, a little less than half are one-handed
off both sides.

Quote:
>> And almost nobody serves and volleys.

I would say very few in the higher ranks (Navratilova, Novotna, Tauziat,
Sukova, & Garrison), but there are more outside of the Top 20 than most
would think.   In any case, the baseliner with the two-handed backhand is
the most common sight in women's tennis no matter what ranking.

Natasha

 
 
 

Backhands: one hand vs. two

Post by Kevin Bur » Wed, 08 Dec 1993 23:39:55



Quote:


> >>Interesting that a couple people have suggested that a one-handed
> >>backhand is more powerful than a two-handed backhand.  I don't think
> >>that the length of the stroke has anything to do with power.  The ball
> >>is on the strings for such a short time that power is all a matter of
> >>force at the point of impact, not follow-through.

> >You may not think that the length of the stroke has anything to do with power,
> >but you are wrong. The longer you can keep the ball on the strings the more
> >power you deliver. A long follow through is critical to impart the most power
> >on the ball. (As well as hitting it flat and in the middle of the racquet).

> I'm not convinced the ball is on the strings longer.  BUT, it seems
> to me that the longer stroke, at the acceleration your arm is
> capable of, gives you more time to increase racket head velocity (on
> the one-handed stroke).  Essentially what another poster said about
> follow-through--it doesn't do anything itself, but is evidence that
> there was some amount of racket speed at impact.

> HOWEVER, the extra strength with two hands should mean higher
> acceleration (I mean, the ability to develop a similar velocity in a
> shorter distance).  In other words, jackrabbit starts and stops.  So
> I wouldn't even hazard a guess which one had more power.  For me
> personally, I think I lack the upper body flexibility to get the
> same power from two hands.

This isn't about tennis directly, but as a point of comparison there has
been (and still may be) a myth in pro baseball that squeezing the heck out
of the bat when making contact with the ball produced extra distance (pace,
power, etc.).  The supporting theory was that the extra inertia of the
batter's body would be transfered to the ball through the bat via the
"tight" coupling produced by gripping the bat as tightly as possible.

A researcher involved in sports science tested this theory and found that
no human - not even Arnold Schwartznegger (sp?) - could hold the bat tight
enough to make a difference.  What was found, however, was that bat head
speed had everything to do with it.  Seems that at typical swinging
velocities the inertia of the bat so dominated the results that the effect
of batter weight and grip were negligible.  When the bat velocity was low
(like when bunting) the grip the batter used had relatively more effect.
So, for full swings, his advice was to hold the bat just tightly enough to
keep from letting go since any tighter could begin to slow the bat.

I heard this on NPR over the summer.

My personal experience has been that for service and ground strokes
(one-handed), staying loose and swinging the through the ball has produced
more pace than I ever wanted.  Two-hander friends of mine that generate
pace appear to be accelerating the racquet very quickly over a shorter arc
and in some cases, kind of snapping or flicking their wrists.  Their stroke
tends to look very explosive rather than smooth and flowing.

Regards, Kevin

 
 
 

Backhands: one hand vs. two

Post by Christopher Smi » Thu, 09 Dec 1993 22:39:14

Quote:
>> >On the women side, virtually almost all of the top 20 players have 2  
>handed
>> >backhands except Graf, Conchita Martinez, Sukova and Martina.
>>      You forgot Sabatini whose one hander is probably the best one in  
>>the woman's game.

In fact, 8 of the top 20 women possess one-handed backhands (including 5
of the current top 6).  The others ones are Novotna, Garrison-Jackson, and
Tauziat.

Scanning down through the entire top 50, I spot close to 20 players total
who use a one-handed backhand.  It should be noted, however, that very
few of these players are relative newcomers to the tour.  

..Chris

--

 
 
 

Backhands: one hand vs. two

Post by Bryan Woodwor » Sat, 11 Dec 1993 10:11:36

Well, I hit a two-hander, because it feels so damn gratifying! I'm a left
handed player, and it feels so great to line up for the backhand and hit it
with two hands.

In baseball, I hit "right," even though I am left handed (I throw left,
though.. odd?).  So, hitting a two-handed backhand in my tennis game feels
very close to my hitting in baseball!  It's so comfortable and relaxing..

I usually resort to the one-handed backhand when I am cut short, I have to
really stretch, or when I am forced into a weird position.

--