one handed vs two handed backhand

one handed vs two handed backhand

Post by vadi » Wed, 12 Feb 2003 09:46:51


Hi,

I heard that it's easier to hit down the line using two handed backhand than
one handed
back hand, does anybody have opinion on this?

Thank you

Vadim

 
 
 

one handed vs two handed backhand

Post by Frank Silberma » Wed, 12 Feb 2003 11:00:58



Quote:

> I heard that it's easier to hit down the line using two handed backhand
> than one handed back hand, does anybody have opinion on this?

With a one-handed backhand it is easier to:
(1) volley well at the net
(2) hit heavy underspin
(3) retrieve shots that are very low or very wide.

For anything but the above, a two-handed backhand is easier.

 
 
 

one handed vs two handed backhand

Post by Edward Ma » Wed, 12 Feb 2003 11:41:58



Quote:



>> I heard that it's easier to hit down the line using two handed backhand
>> than one handed back hand, does anybody have opinion on this?

> With a one-handed backhand it is easier to:
> (1) volley well at the net
> (2) hit heavy underspin
> (3) retrieve shots that are very low or very wide.

> For anything but the above, a two-handed backhand is easier.

It's a nice theory, but don't you think that one handed players
learn to compensate for the strokes weaknesses?

Ed

 
 
 

one handed vs two handed backhand

Post by Frank Silberma » Wed, 12 Feb 2003 11:47:10

Quote:


>>> I heard that it's easier to hit down the line using two handed backhand
>>> than one handed back hand, does anybody have opinion on this?

>> With a one-handed backhand it is easier to:
>> (1) volley well at the net
>> (2) hit heavy underspin
>> (3) retrieve shots that are very low or very wide.

>> For anything but the above, a two-handed backhand is easier.



Quote:

> It's a nice theory, but don't you think that one handed players
> learn to compensate for the strokes weaknesses?

Yes, they do compensate.  Some compensate by slicing a lot and
holding back their attack until they get a forehand (e.g. Steffi Graf).
Others compensate by avoiding groundstrokes completely whenever
possible by serving and volleying, chipping and charging (moreso
before 1980 than today).

Today the fashion is for one-handers to compensate by using
an extreme western backhand grip for high balls within easy reach,
and a continental slice for everything else (since that
western grip is useless if you have to reach for the ball).

 
 
 

one handed vs two handed backhand

Post by quick_ic » Wed, 12 Feb 2003 13:57:16

Agree. Also, 1-handed backhand requires very good timing but once the timing
is right, the pace one can generate is even greater than that off 2-handed
and, 1-handed backhand has the most natural swing of all. That makes one
recover very quickly after the execution. But the main reason I choose
2-handed backhand is because I can change direction at the last minute. Even
when I'm late I can still hit a decent shot. I always have problems with the
timing hitting a 1-handed backhand drive.

backhand it is easier to:

Quote:
> (1) volley well at the net
> (2) hit heavy underspin
> (3) retrieve shots that are very low or very wide.

> For anything but the above, a two-handed backhand is easier.

 
 
 

one handed vs two handed backhand

Post by Gordon Camer » Wed, 12 Feb 2003 20:29:15

I just started taking lessons.  My teacher looked at my one handed
backhand and said it was very weak; I was basically just pushing the
ball back over the net.  He encouraged me to try a 2 hander, which
I've been trying for a while now.  Seems okay -- definitely more of an
attacking shot, and it's easier to clear the net without slicing it.
Still, I love *looking* at a good one handed backhand (i.e. Haas,
Henin) and would like to develop that stroke myself.  Oh well, for now
I'll follow coach's advice and see how it goes.  Even if I use the 2
hander as my "bread and butter" shot, I still want to be able to hit
one-handed slice when needed, and be able to volley well on the
backhand side.  I hope that's possible.

Quote:
> Agree. Also, 1-handed backhand requires very good timing but once the timing
> is right, the pace one can generate is even greater than that off 2-handed
> and, 1-handed backhand has the most natural swing of all. That makes one
> recover very quickly after the execution. But the main reason I choose
> 2-handed backhand is because I can change direction at the last minute. Even
> when I'm late I can still hit a decent shot. I always have problems with the
> timing hitting a 1-handed backhand drive.


> backhand it is easier to:
> > (1) volley well at the net
> > (2) hit heavy underspin
> > (3) retrieve shots that are very low or very wide.

> > For anything but the above, a two-handed backhand is easier.

 
 
 

one handed vs two handed backhand

Post by Neil Robinso » Wed, 12 Feb 2003 20:49:13

Quote:
> possible by serving and volleying, chipping and charging (moreso
> before 1980 than today).

You are saying that the death of serve / volley tennis happened circa 1980?
I always thought of it being more mid-90s. In the late 80s, early 90s Becker
and Edberg were *** players with a serve / volley style?
 
 
 

one handed vs two handed backhand

Post by Edward Ma » Wed, 12 Feb 2003 22:02:39



Quote:



>>>> I heard that it's easier to hit down the line using two handed backhand
>>>> than one handed back hand, does anybody have opinion on this?

>>> With a one-handed backhand it is easier to:
>>> (1) volley well at the net
>>> (2) hit heavy underspin
>>> (3) retrieve shots that are very low or very wide.

>>> For anything but the above, a two-handed backhand is easier.



>> It's a nice theory, but don't you think that one handed players
>> learn to compensate for the strokes weaknesses?

> Yes, they do compensate.  Some compensate by slicing a lot and
> holding back their attack until they get a forehand (e.g. Steffi Graf).
> Others compensate by avoiding groundstrokes completely whenever
> possible by serving and volleying, chipping and charging (moreso
> before 1980 than today).

> Today the fashion is for one-handers to compensate by using
> an extreme western backhand grip for high balls within easy reach,
> and a continental slice for everything else (since that
> western grip is useless if you have to reach for the ball).

I agree that the severe eastern (western grip) is used frequently.

I also have to add that in order to compensate for high balls, a
good one handed back hand player develops a sense of timing;
an increased ability to hit high bouncing balls on the rise. This is
something which, imo, occurs naturally after a playing consistently against
heavy topspin. It isn't necessary to resort to an extreme grip OR slice.

Ed

 
 
 

one handed vs two handed backhand

Post by Valjea » Wed, 12 Feb 2003 22:10:58

You've forgotten the topspin backhand; why is that....


Quote:



> >>> I heard that it's easier to hit down the line using two handed
backhand
> >>> than one handed back hand, does anybody have opinion on this?

> >> With a one-handed backhand it is easier to:
> >> (1) volley well at the net
> >> (2) hit heavy underspin
> >> (3) retrieve shots that are very low or very wide.

> >> For anything but the above, a two-handed backhand is easier.



> > It's a nice theory, but don't you think that one handed players
> > learn to compensate for the strokes weaknesses?

> Yes, they do compensate.  Some compensate by slicing a lot and
> holding back their attack until they get a forehand (e.g. Steffi Graf).
> Others compensate by avoiding groundstrokes completely whenever
> possible by serving and volleying, chipping and charging (moreso
> before 1980 than today).

> Today the fashion is for one-handers to compensate by using
> an extreme western backhand grip for high balls within easy reach,
> and a continental slice for everything else (since that
> western grip is useless if you have to reach for the ball).

 
 
 

one handed vs two handed backhand

Post by Frank Silberma » Wed, 12 Feb 2003 22:14:29



Quote:

> I just started taking lessons.  My teacher looked at my one handed
> backhand and said it was very weak; I was basically just pushing the
> ball back over the net.  He encouraged me to try a 2 hander, which
> I've been trying for a while now.  Seems okay -- definitely more of an
> attacking shot, and it's easier to clear the net without slicing it.
> Still, I love *looking* at a good one handed backhand (i.e. Haas,
> Henin) and would like to develop that stroke myself.  Oh well, for now
> I'll follow coach's advice and see how it goes.  Even if I use the 2
> hander as my "bread and butter" shot, I still want to be able to hit
> one-handed slice when needed, and be able to volley well on the
> backhand side.  I hope that's possible.

Matts Wilander played that way, though he never tried to become
a great volleyer.  As long as you develop the two strokes together
you should be able to have the best of both worlds.  Mix in lots
of one-handed slices from the baseline to develop your arm,
and your volley will be better for it.  It will probably also
increase the effectiveness of your power 2-hander.
 
 
 

one handed vs two handed backhand

Post by Frank Silberma » Wed, 12 Feb 2003 22:16:15


Quote:

>> possible by serving and volleying, chipping and charging (moreso
>> before 1980 than today).

>You are saying that the death of serve / volley tennis happened circa 1980?
>I always thought of it being more mid-90s. In the late 80s, early 90s Becker
>and Edberg were *** players with a serve / volley style?

Yes, they played that style, but not to cover up weak backhands.
(Maybe Edberg was covering up a weak forehand...)

/Frank

 
 
 

one handed vs two handed backhand

Post by Frank Silberma » Wed, 12 Feb 2003 22:21:39

Quote:
>> >> With a one-handed backhand it is easier to:
>> >> (1) volley well at the net
>> >> (2) hit heavy underspin
>> >> (3) retrieve shots that are very low or very wide.

>> >> For anything but the above, a two-handed backhand is easier.


Quote:
> You've forgotten the topspin backhand; why is that....

The topspin backhand is easier with a two-hander.
You can learn to topspin a one-hander, but it will
never be as flexible as a two-hander in terms of
the variety of balls you can use it on (high, low,
on-the-run, not bounced yet) and the variety
of directions you can send it (from sharp crosscourt
to inside-out).
 
 
 

one handed vs two handed backhand

Post by Michael Scarpit » Wed, 12 Feb 2003 23:25:12

Quote:

> Hi,

> I heard that it's easier to hit down the line using two handed backhand than
> one handed
> back hand, does anybody have opinion on this?

> Thank you

> Vadim

I disagree. It's just as easy, or easier, to go down the line with the
one handed backhand.
 
 
 

one handed vs two handed backhand

Post by big ben » Wed, 12 Feb 2003 23:38:52

Quote:



> > Today the fashion is for one-handers to compensate by using
> > an extreme western backhand grip for high balls within easy reach,
> > and a continental slice for everything else (since that
> > western grip is useless if you have to reach for the ball).

> I agree that the severe eastern (western grip) is used frequently.

i'm not exactly sure what a "western backhand grip" is; one of the things
that western grips do for you is to allow you to hit forehand or backhand
without a repositioning of the racquet in your hand.
 
 
 

one handed vs two handed backhand

Post by Neil Robinso » Wed, 12 Feb 2003 23:40:58

So how come the best down the line backhands (i.e. Agassi, Connors) belong
to 2 handers?



Quote:
> > Hi,

> > I heard that it's easier to hit down the line using two handed backhand
than
> > one handed
> > back hand, does anybody have opinion on this?

> > Thank you

> > Vadim

> I disagree. It's just as easy, or easier, to go down the line with the
> one handed backhand.