Older 1980's Tennis Racquet Question - Kennex Pro Boron - Keep or Retire

Older 1980's Tennis Racquet Question - Kennex Pro Boron - Keep or Retire

Post by geogo.. » Thu, 15 Jun 2006 02:33:34


Hello,

I've recently gotten back into the sport after nearly 20 years, I'm 46
now. I have a Kennex Pro Boron Racquet. It is midsize, probabably a 4
5/8 grip, strung over 10-15 years ago with some sort of translucent
yellow nylon. The strings are still very tight. You can move the outer
one's slightly with some force and you hear the "click" when they move.
I remember that when I bought this racquet it felt somewhat lighter
than many of the others I had sampled. Now it feels alittle top heavy
relative to the other one's on the rack. Maybe they're just very light
or mine's just heavier. It's very good at absorbing vibration. I'm
guessing that it's probably a medium weight racquet. The frame is very
streamlined, interesting throat.

I'm a strong hitter and the racquet feels great serving and hitting
hard baseline shots. Actually it feels pretty good on most any shot
that's well hit as long as I'm in the sweet spot, which applies to most
racquets I guess. I get a beautiful thump sound when I hit cleanly. It
appears to very good at absorbing vibration. I'm guessing that it's
probably a medium weight racquet. The frame is very streamlined,
interesting throat.

I'm sure that a new stringing will make a huge difference.  My question
is.

Do I have a good racquet that I should restring and keep or do I have a
dinosaur that I should immediately retire?

 
 
 

Older 1980's Tennis Racquet Question - Kennex Pro Boron - Keep or Retire

Post by UC » Thu, 15 Jun 2006 02:38:05

Quote:

> Hello,

> I've recently gotten back into the sport after nearly 20 years, I'm 46
> now. I have a Kennex Pro Boron Racquet. It is midsize, probabably a 4
> 5/8 grip, strung over 10-15 years ago with some sort of translucent
> yellow nylon. The strings are still very tight. You can move the outer
> one's slightly with some force and you hear the "click" when they move.
> I remember that when I bought this racquet it felt somewhat lighter
> than many of the others I had sampled. Now it feels alittle top heavy
> relative to the other one's on the rack. Maybe they're just very light
> or mine's just heavier. It's very good at absorbing vibration. I'm
> guessing that it's probably a medium weight racquet. The frame is very
> streamlined, interesting throat.

> I'm a strong hitter and the racquet feels great serving and hitting
> hard baseline shots. Actually it feels pretty good on most any shot
> that's well hit as long as I'm in the sweet spot, which applies to most
> racquets I guess. I get a beautiful thump sound when I hit cleanly. It
> appears to very good at absorbing vibration. I'm guessing that it's
> probably a medium weight racquet. The frame is very streamlined,
> interesting throat.

> I'm sure that a new stringing will make a huge difference.  My question
> is.

> Do I have a good racquet that I should restring and keep or do I have a
> dinosaur that I should immediately retire?

I play with 35-year old wooden frames and play just fine. String your
racquet with natural gut (16 gauge) at about 60-63 lbs and see how you
like it.

 
 
 

Older 1980's Tennis Racquet Question - Kennex Pro Boron - Keep or Retire

Post by pedrod.. » Thu, 15 Jun 2006 02:41:32

Quote:

> Hello,

> I've recently gotten back into the sport after nearly 20 years, I'm 46
> now. I have a Kennex Pro Boron Racquet. It is midsize, probabably a 4
> 5/8 grip, strung over 10-15 years ago with some sort of translucent
> yellow nylon. The strings are still very tight. You can move the outer
> one's slightly with some force and you hear the "click" when they move.
> I remember that when I bought this racquet it felt somewhat lighter
> than many of the others I had sampled. Now it feels alittle top heavy
> relative to the other one's on the rack. Maybe they're just very light
> or mine's just heavier. It's very good at absorbing vibration. I'm
> guessing that it's probably a medium weight racquet. The frame is very
> streamlined, interesting throat.

> I'm a strong hitter and the racquet feels great serving and hitting
> hard baseline shots. Actually it feels pretty good on most any shot
> that's well hit as long as I'm in the sweet spot, which applies to most
> racquets I guess. I get a beautiful thump sound when I hit cleanly. It
> appears to very good at absorbing vibration. I'm guessing that it's
> probably a medium weight racquet. The frame is very streamlined,
> interesting throat.

> I'm sure that a new stringing will make a huge difference.  My question
> is.

> Do I have a good racquet that I should restring and keep or do I have a
> dinosaur that I should immediately retire?

I still play with my Boron Ace. Great racquet. A lot of players looking
for control still play with racquets of this vintage: Sampras played
with a contemporary Wilson Pro Staff throughout his career. Most of the
control racquets produced today have essentially the same specs,
anyway. Some window dressing, but I haven't found anything I like
better.

The main difference is in the manufacturers ability to produce light,
powerful racquets while maintaining at least a little control. That end
of the spectrum is radically improved.

 
 
 

Older 1980's Tennis Racquet Question - Kennex Pro Boron - Keep or Retire

Post by GregRupedsk » Thu, 15 Jun 2006 06:42:53


Quote:
> Hello,

> I've recently gotten back into the sport after nearly 20 years, I'm 46
> now. I have a Kennex Pro Boron Racquet. It is midsize, probabably a 4
> 5/8 grip, strung over 10-15 years ago with some sort of translucent
> yellow nylon. The strings are still very tight. You can move the outer
> one's slightly with some force and you hear the "click" when they move.
> I remember that when I bought this racquet it felt somewhat lighter
> than many of the others I had sampled. Now it feels alittle top heavy
> relative to the other one's on the rack. Maybe they're just very light
> or mine's just heavier. It's very good at absorbing vibration. I'm
> guessing that it's probably a medium weight racquet. The frame is very
> streamlined, interesting throat.

> I'm a strong hitter and the racquet feels great serving and hitting
> hard baseline shots. Actually it feels pretty good on most any shot
> that's well hit as long as I'm in the sweet spot, which applies to most
> racquets I guess. I get a beautiful thump sound when I hit cleanly. It
> appears to very good at absorbing vibration. I'm guessing that it's
> probably a medium weight racquet. The frame is very streamlined,
> interesting throat.

> I'm sure that a new stringing will make a huge difference.  My question
> is.

> Do I have a good racquet that I should restring and keep or do I have a
> dinosaur that I should immediately retire?

Greg, a racquet's longevity is determined by many factors, how it was
stored, frequency and style of play, and especially # of restringings.
Actually if you store a racquet unusued this long, I prefer to cut the
strings(of course this rarely happens ;-). But if it was stored well, at
least it didn't take much abuse over those years. However, I have no doubt
that your racquet now plays differently than a brand new Kennex PBR would
play, but that does not necessarily mean "bad".

Quite frankly, especially since you are just getting back into the sport,
i'd recommend staying with it since you say it feels great! IF you liked
your game before, nothing will bring back your skills faster than using your
old gear.(studies have even shown that using equipment on which a certain
skill was once learned can trigger the same motor neuron patterns) Better to
get your full game and confidence back before you begin even
looking/experimenting with what you might want as your next frame. I'll
assume you don't compete since you seem to be talking about only 1 frame.

Don't be fooled by the ads/hype and "look at all the new models, I have an
old model, I guess I should have a new model, what a disadvantage!". It's
the player and skill that count. Also, do not be seduced by the
lightness(probably why you notice quite a difference picking up current
models) or stiffness available today, this can be quite helpful if you
require some more power. If you don't, feel is more important and you might
have problems finding that with the lightest/stiffest models. If you like
your current frame, you'd probably be looking for a modern day equivalent,
in short, something not that much different than what you have! Actually,
you specifically mentioned you think it absorbs vibration well, I do find
that even the "players" racquets of today tend to have stiffer(for a slight
boost in power) feel, many old time racquets have a softer more flexible
feel which is awesome if you can use well, they also tended to be strung
looser. (undoubtedly your strings are now very loose) So, if the frame still
seems to play well to you, I say relax, enjoy it and concentrate on your
game. Later, you might find a new frame you also like, but if it ain't
broke, don't fix it.

 Of course, if you start playing competitively, you'll have to look for a
new frame.

 
 
 

Older 1980's Tennis Racquet Question - Kennex Pro Boron - Keep or Retire

Post by geogo.. » Fri, 16 Jun 2006 05:22:21

Quote:



> > Hello,

> > I've recently gotten back into the sport after nearly 20 years, I'm 46
> > now. I have a Kennex Pro Boron Racquet. It is midsize, probabably a 4
> > 5/8 grip, strung over 10-15 years ago with some sort of translucent
> > yellow nylon. The strings are still very tight. You can move the outer
> > one's slightly with some force and you hear the "click" when they move.
> > I remember that when I bought this racquet it felt somewhat lighter
> > than many of the others I had sampled. Now it feels alittle top heavy
> > relative to the other one's on the rack. Maybe they're just very light
> > or mine's just heavier. It's very good at absorbing vibration. I'm
> > guessing that it's probably a medium weight racquet. The frame is very
> > streamlined, interesting throat.

> > I'm a strong hitter and the racquet feels great serving and hitting
> > hard baseline shots. Actually it feels pretty good on most any shot
> > that's well hit as long as I'm in the sweet spot, which applies to most
> > racquets I guess. I get a beautiful thump sound when I hit cleanly. It
> > appears to very good at absorbing vibration. I'm guessing that it's
> > probably a medium weight racquet. The frame is very streamlined,
> > interesting throat.

> > I'm sure that a new stringing will make a huge difference.  My question
> > is.

> > Do I have a good racquet that I should restring and keep or do I have a
> > dinosaur that I should immediately retire?

> Greg, a racquet's longevity is determined by many factors, how it was
> stored, frequency and style of play, and especially # of restringings.
> Actually if you store a racquet unusued this long, I prefer to cut the
> strings(of course this rarely happens ;-). But if it was stored well, at
> least it didn't take much abuse over those years. However, I have no doubt
> that your racquet now plays differently than a brand new Kennex PBR would
> play, but that does not necessarily mean "bad".

> Quite frankly, especially since you are just getting back into the sport,
> i'd recommend staying with it since you say it feels great! IF you liked
> your game before, nothing will bring back your skills faster than using your
> old gear.(studies have even shown that using equipment on which a certain
> skill was once learned can trigger the same motor neuron patterns) Better to
> get your full game and confidence back before you begin even
> looking/experimenting with what you might want as your next frame. I'll
> assume you don't compete since you seem to be talking about only 1 frame.

> Don't be fooled by the ads/hype and "look at all the new models, I have an
> old model, I guess I should have a new model, what a disadvantage!". It's
> the player and skill that count. Also, do not be seduced by the
> lightness(probably why you notice quite a difference picking up current
> models) or stiffness available today, this can be quite helpful if you
> require some more power. If you don't, feel is more important and you might
> have problems finding that with the lightest/stiffest models. If you like
> your current frame, you'd probably be looking for a modern day equivalent,
> in short, something not that much different than what you have! Actually,
> you specifically mentioned you think it absorbs vibration well, I do find
> that even the "players" racquets of today tend to have stiffer(for a slight
> boost in power) feel, many old time racquets have a softer more flexible
> feel which is awesome if you can use well, they also tended to be strung
> looser. (undoubtedly your strings are now very loose) So, if the frame still
> seems to play well to you, I say relax, enjoy it and concentrate on your
> game. Later, you might find a new frame you also like, but if it ain't
> broke, don't fix it.

>  Of course, if you start playing competitively, you'll have to look for a
> new frame.

Thanks for all the great feedback.

I had really expected to hear that I should retire the racquet. I'm
going to bring my racquet in to  a pro shop for evaluation and get
pricing on restringing.

I'm shopping for a racquet for my wife and it looks like she's going to
buy the Head Liquid Metal 8.  It got good reviews, she likes the way it
feels, and appears to be appropriate for her as she is an advanced
beginner that is improving rapidly.

While doing the research for her I came across what appears to be a
potentially good deal for me.  I'm going to check out the Head Liquid
Metal Radical, midsized, for $79.99.
It got really good reviews and has similar traits to my Kennex.
Perhaps I'll spend an extra $50 and get a new racquet instead of
restringing the old one, or do both.  I have two guitars, having two
racquets doesn't seem that unreasonable :)

George

 
 
 

Older 1980's Tennis Racquet Question - Kennex Pro Boron - Keep or Retire

Post by stephen » Fri, 16 Jun 2006 05:58:55

Quote:

> Hello,

> I've recently gotten back into the sport after nearly 20 years, I'm 46
> now. I have a Kennex Pro Boron Racquet.

for years back in the early-mid 80s i played with kennex rackets, the
"bronze" and "silver" varieties. good rackets.

--
"when i visited Aden before collectivization,
all the markets were full of fish product. After
collectivization, the fish immediately disappeared."

- Aleksandr Vassiliev, Soviet KGB official