SAIL SIZE VERSUS SAILOR WEIGHT

SAIL SIZE VERSUS SAILOR WEIGHT

Post by DBlackm » Wed, 27 Mar 1996 04:00:00


The fairly large response to recent "Big Sailor?" posting inspires me to
try Sail Size versus Body Weight questionnaire again.  Please post for all
to see.  I'll post summaries of area/weight ratios from time to time.  

WIND RANGE                                    IDEAL SAIL SIZE
mph            knots         km/hr                 sq meter

35+            30+            56+              =          
20-35        17-30        32-56          =
15-20        13-17        24-32          =
10-15          9-13        16-24          =
  7-10          6-9          11-16          =
  5-7            4-6            6-11          =

Weight =  
Height =
     Age =
Gender (M/F):
Skill (x): Novice (  ),  Intermediate (  ),  Expert (  )
Outhaul Control (Y/N):
Downhaul Control (Y/N):

Comments:

 
 
 

SAIL SIZE VERSUS SAILOR WEIGHT

Post by NLW TFW » Thu, 28 Mar 1996 04:00:00

Realize that sail size selection depends TREMENDOUSLY on the type of sail
and sailing. In the same amount of wind, you're likely to see 160-pound
sailors on 4.5s in the waves, 5..0s for B&J, and 6.5m -- or even 7.0 --
race sails. That's a 2-meter range, at least, due just to sailing style
and number of cams, all at the same rider weight. Ya gotta consider the
application as much or more than the sailor weight when picking numbers.
And that doesn't take into account the half-meter-or-more difference among
brands when they paint the size numbers on.

For those reasons, plus consistent feel and performance, it really pays to
pick a line or two of sails and wean ourselves from the Heinz 57 litters
we all start out with.

Mike \m/
Never Leave Wind To Find Wind

 
 
 

SAIL SIZE VERSUS SAILOR WEIGHT

Post by Gary Wo » Fri, 29 Mar 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

>Realize that sail size selection depends TREMENDOUSLY on the type of sail
>and sailing. In the same amount of wind, you're likely to see 160-pound
>sailors on 4.5s in the waves, 5..0s for B&J, and 6.5m -- or even 7.0 --

Ditto to Mike's statements.  Plus, sometimes its more fun to take out
more of a sinker board and up your sail size to compensate.  You may
wish to work this into your formula.

 
 
 

SAIL SIZE VERSUS SAILOR WEIGHT

Post by Sting-a-ling-a-ding-do » Fri, 29 Mar 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

>WIND RANGE                                    IDEAL SAIL SIZE
>mph            knots         km/hr                 sq meter

>35+            30+            56+            = 5.0 - 4.0
>20-35          17-30          32-56          = 6.0 - 5.0
>15-20          13-17          24-32          = 6.8 - 6.0
>10-15           9-13          16-24          = 6.8
> 7-10           6-9           11-16          = 7.8
> 5-7            4-6            6-11          = 7.8

>Weight =  165lbs
>Height =   5'8"
>Age =  26
>Gender (M/F): M
>Skill (x): Novice (  ),  Intermediate (  ),  Expert ( X )
>Outhaul Control (Y/N): N
>Downhaul Control (Y/N): N

>Comments:

        These are my specs, although I know I tend to rig big for my weight
because if I am not planing I am not happy.  I'd rather get slammed...

---
+----------------------------+------------------------------+-----------------+



|Raytheon,_Marlborough,_Mass_|__________(US-775)____________|_________________|
|                    "Windsurfing is life, the rest is just details."         |
+----------------------------+------------------------------------------------+
|  BIG Certified Instructor  | My homepage: http://www.ultranet.com/~lefebvre |
+---Seatrend----Neil-Pryde---+----Dynafiber----Finworks-----Bare----Zeiner----+

 
 
 

SAIL SIZE VERSUS SAILOR WEIGHT

Post by Serge Rezzonic » Fri, 29 Mar 1996 04:00:00

Quote:

>Ditto to Mike's statements.  Plus, sometimes its more fun to take out
>more of a sinker board and up your sail size to compensate.  You may
>wish to work this into your formula.

I'm not so sure about that.
I'd say you were way underpowered with your big board,
if you can take a bigger sail with the sinker.
In fully powered conditions, I personally go for less board and less sail
(and less fin and more fun) if I can.

--

Serge

 
 
 

SAIL SIZE VERSUS SAILOR WEIGHT

Post by NLW TFW » Fri, 29 Mar 1996 04:00:00

Serge hit on another sail size factor: personal preference.

Often two sailors of the same size, skill, board, and wind will be on
sails differing by a half meter or even a meter due just to preference.

Because LIFE'S TO SHORT TO SCHLOG, I always rig to plane fully and easily
in the lulls, which requires sailing overpowered in the gusts in most
locations. Other sailors don't mind schlogging, don't mind pumping every
time they or the wind slows down, or just don't like sailing overpowered
and thus rig smaller.

A friend my size is always half a meter to a meter beow my sail size
because he prides himself on efficient sailing, does not jump, has a lower
fear threshhold (or is it a higher IQ?) than I, and maneuvers very little
by choice. I maneuver constantly  (scrubbing off lots of speed in the
process), jump as often as I can, and care less about efficiency than
about continuous planing and adrenaline.

Confused yet? Just as there ain't no best sail or best board, there ain't
no best size of either, either -- not even in rock-steady 22.6 kt wind.

Keep your eyes open, experiment, learn -- and maybe within a few years
you'll be able to say "This is a 5.0 day" - and be within a meter of being
right.
Mike \m/
Never Leave Wind To Find Wind

 
 
 

SAIL SIZE VERSUS SAILOR WEIGHT

Post by Thomas M. Whittemo » Sat, 30 Mar 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

>The fairly large response to recent "Big Sailor?" posting inspires me to
>try Sail Size versus Body Weight questionnaire again.  Please post for all
>to see.  I'll post summaries of area/weight ratios from time to time.  

>WIND RANGE                                    IDEAL SAIL SIZE
>mph            knots         km/hr                 sq meter

>35+            30+            56+              =   3.5 or 3.9      
>20-35        17-30        32-56          = 5.6 or 5.0
>15-20        13-17        24-32          = 5.6
>10-15          9-13        16-24          = 6.2
>  7-10          6-9          11-16          = 6.8
>  5-7            4-6            6-11          = 6.8

>Weight =  162 lbs
>Height = 5'4"
>     Age = 42
>Gender (M/F): m
>Skill (x): Novice (  ),  Intermediate ( x ),  Expert (  )
>Outhaul Control (Y/N): n
>Downhaul Control (Y/N):n

>Comments:  Sail size depends heavily on wind quality

qusty weather requires larger sails for the lulls

   (\        (  Thomas M. Whittemore    USWA/ABC     (  sites:
   {_\       (  East Greenbush, NY FANATIC/F2 Xantos ( Saratoga Lk.

   {i__\     (  "911"            US-TW               ( L. Champlain
  ++^++++++  (sect/treas Adirondack Boardsailing Club( AVON
Club Web site: http://www.rpi.edu/~guidom/adirondack.html

 
 
 

SAIL SIZE VERSUS SAILOR WEIGHT

Post by NLW TFW » Mon, 01 Apr 1996 04:00:00

We've now seen this chart posted approximately 10-12 times in just the
past week for some reason, and seen at least 13 reasons why it's so
generalized that it's of limited applicability. Isn't it sort like the way
the military does business:  Measure it with a laser, mark it with a spray
pain can, and cut it with an axe? All the precision in the world doesn't
change the basic fact that on a given day you'll see average-weight people
enjoying sail sizes ranging over a meter or even two meters difference,
and all of them feel they're rigged about right on the average. Given
that, reading whitecaps is close enough. By the time we take into account
personal preference, rider weight and ability, number of cams, sail sizing
technique and accuracy, sail quality and design, sail tuning, wind
quality, water conditions, sailing style (straight-line reaching or
power-robbing maneuvering), what's downwind of you (if it's a 100-foot
drop over an unprotected spillway or another continent, you'd better rig
big enough to sail upwind in the lightest lulls), board and fin size, the
wind out on the water versus the wind in your hand-held meter on shore,
whether the wind should build or decay, and your very reason for being out
there (racing for cash and glory or just having fun), these painstakingly
developed charts are primarily academic exercises.

By the time a sailor is experienced enough to minimize the variation from
even half of these confusion factors, s/he's also experienced enough to
mentally integrate whitecaps to calculate his or own ballpark sail size.
The theoretical 155-pound good sailor can generally throw on a 7.something
if there are no whitecaps, a 6.something if there are a few whitecaps, a
5.something if there are plenty of caps, a 4.something if there are a
whole lot of hefty caps, and a 3.something if the wind is blowing spray
off most of the caps. And if a person is even considering going out in
that much wind, s/he already knows all this.

Given that modern  sails work fine over a 2-meter range at the large end
and nearly a 1-meter range at the small end (at least a 20% room for
error), caps are usually close enough for government work.

The charts are nice, and took someone a lot of effort, but we don't sail
on paper; we sail on water, in gusty wind, with a big sheet of plastic in
our hands and a little piece of plastic under our back foot. Don't get
paralyzed by selecting sail size; it costs you too much time where it
counts: out there. Park your van and keep glancing at the water as you get
your wetsuit and board out, find your harness, rub on some sunscreen, fill
the dog's water bowl, shove down some more carbos and water, dig out your
mast and boom and mast base, say hi to your buds, ask seven of them what
size sail they're on, and ignore their answers unless you know how your
sail size usually compares to theirs. By that time your 10 glances at the
water have already told you what to rig anyway, and probably much more
accurately than any chart. Get your ass on the water and hang on to what
you rigged for a while. You'll know within one or two gust/lull cycles if
you're rigged right.

Besides, the wind's gonna change by a meter within 20 minutes. Twice.

KISS (Keep It Simple, Sailor)
Mike \m/
Never Leave Wind To Find Wind

 
 
 

SAIL SIZE VERSUS SAILOR WEIGHT

Post by Ed Fost » Mon, 01 Apr 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

> The fairly large response to recent "Big Sailor?" posting inspires me to
> try Sail Size versus Body Weight questionnaire again.  Please post for all
> to see.  I'll post summaries of area/weight ratios from time to time.  

> WIND RANGE                                    IDEAL SAIL SIZE
> mph            knots         km/hr                 sq meter

> 35+            30+            56+              =  4.0        
> 20-35        17-30        32-56          = 5.9, 5.3, 4.7
> 15-20        13-17        24-32          = 7.0, 6.4
> 10-15          9-13        16-24          =
>   7-10          6-9          11-16          =
>   5-7            4-6            6-11          =

> Weight = 190 lb
> Height = 6'
>      Age = 52
> Gender (M/F):M
> Skill (x): Novice (  ),  Intermediate ( x ),  Expert ( x ) (in between)
> Outhaul Control (Y/N):N
> Downhaul Control (Y/N):Y

> Comments: 7.0 is Pryde V8, 6.4 and 5.9 are are Waddell race, others are

Waddell slaloms - great sails - too bad they're not made anymore.

--
Ed Foster

 
 
 

SAIL SIZE VERSUS SAILOR WEIGHT

Post by Xtrspor » Tue, 02 Apr 1996 04:00:00


Quote:
NM) writes:
> By that time your 10 glances at the
>water have already told you what to rig anyway, and probably much more
>accurately than any chart. Get your ass on the water and hang on to what
>you rigged for a while. You'll know within one or two gust/lull cycles if
>you're rigged right.

>Besides, the wind's gonna change by a meter within 20 minutes. Twice.

>KISS (Keep It Simple, Sailor)
>Mike \m/
>Never Leave Wind To Find Wind

ditto!
 
 
 

SAIL SIZE VERSUS SAILOR WEIGHT

Post by mbri.. » Tue, 09 Apr 1996 04:00:00

Quote:

> The fairly large response to recent "Big Sailor?" posting inspires me to
> try Sail Size versus Body Weight questionnaire again.  Please post for all
> to see.  I'll post summaries of area/weight ratios from time to time.  

> WIND RANGE                                    IDEAL SAIL SIZE
> mph            knots         km/hr                 sq meter

> 35+            30+            56+        = 3.5-3.9 pending gustiness        
> 20-35        17-30        32-56          = 6.0 to 4.0 (big range of wind)
> 15-20        13-17        24-32          = 6.5 RACE, 5.5-6.0 slalom
> 10-15          9-13        16-24         = 7.2-7.7 RACE
>   7-10          6-9          11-16       = 5.5 soft sail longboard freestyle
>   5-7            4-6            6-11     = Beer.0 or kite flying

> Weight = 170
> Height = 6-1
>      Age = 39
> Gender (M/F): M
> Skill (x): Novice (  ),  Intermediate (  ),  Expert (X )
> Outhaul Control (Y/N): Y
> Downhaul Control (Y/N): N

> Comments: Barry Ritchey "NM-0"

 
 
 

SAIL SIZE VERSUS SAILOR WEIGHT

Post by Walter Clar » Thu, 11 Apr 1996 04:00:00

 WIND RANGE                                    IDEAL SAIL SIZE
 mph            knots         km/hr                 sq meter

 35+            30+          56+          = 3.7
 20-35        17-30        32-56          = 5.2-4.0
 15-20        13-17        24-32          = 6.9-6.0
 10-15         9-13        16-24          = large enough to cover a beach chair
  7-10         6-9         11-16          = time to break out the inlines
  5-7          4-6          6-11          =

 Weight = 225
 Height = 6-3
 Age = 39
 Gender (M/F): M
 Skill (x): Novice (  ),  Intermediate (  ),  Advanced (X)   Expert (  )
 Outhaul Control (Y/N): N
 Downhaul Control (Y/N): N