Starboard Formula 155

Starboard Formula 155

Post by sailqui » Wed, 01 Mar 2000 04:00:00


PBNATHOME:
Yes, I have sailed the Pre Production Formula 155, and now have some time on the
Production Formula 155.
I only weigh 160 lbs, so my experience may be very different than what you will
find at 70 lbs heavier.
Alan Bernau, who weighs over 200, will be racing one this weekend at the
Midwinters Regatta at Calema Boardsailing in Merritt Island FL.
He has sailed his a bit, in 10-15 (He said he liked it alot, and in T-Storm
gusts
20-35 (he was on a 10.6 Z-1) where he was grossly overpowered. So when he got
in,
he downhauled the stuffing out of the Z-1 and went back out and said that
besides
being super overpowered he was enjoying the ride. For big guys, the fin may need
upgrading as Alan said the 58 cm spun out a few times, but I suspect the lulls
got him (or maybe the mega gusts). I too have managed to spin out the 58 cm
CR-12
that comes with the board, but it's always been sailing into much less wind
without
realizing it. Push that big fin, with diminishing MFP due to the lull, and it
will
come loose. Hooks right back up though.
At only 155 liters, you are going to need about 12 knots, or a very big sail to
get the F155 going I think.
Have you ever considered the RACE GO, which is only 2 cm narrower, but has
30-40 liters more volume. Might make a better lite air board for someone your
size.
Hope this helps, Roger
 
 
 

Starboard Formula 155

Post by PBNATHO » Thu, 02 Mar 2000 04:00:00

Has any one sailed one of these?  I am looking for a new board and am weighing
the possibilities.  I like the Seatrend Star 80 the bic Techno but, the Formula
155 looks really interesting and may have a better wind range for me (230 lbs).
 Any input would be appreciated.

 
 
 

Starboard Formula 155

Post by Will Harpe » Thu, 02 Mar 2000 04:00:00

Quote:

> Has any one sailed one of these?  I am looking for a new board and am weighing
> the possibilities.  I like the Seatrend Star 80 the bic Techno but, the Formula
> 155 looks really interesting and may have a better wind range for me (230 lbs).
>  Any input would be appreciated.

You may want to check out the NEW monster Techno due out this spring.
Has a very interesting fin configuration, tons of volume and
versatility.  I don't know what it's like to be 230 lbs, but I would
immagine floatation is a plus.  The current Techno 283 is probably too
small for you unless you live in a very windy place (Gorge, SF Bay, etc).

I saw a picture of an RRD formula board that looked interesting.  I
would think that you would want close to 200 liters....  

I'll send you a personal e-mail of specs and pictures of the board,
can't post them on the NG (I don't think).

--
William S. Harper


 
 
 

Starboard Formula 155

Post by bbent.. » Thu, 02 Mar 2000 04:00:00

Roger,

I am very interested in the Formula 155 and wonder how it compares to
the Go. I am an intermediate level sailor interested in planing early
and weigh 185 lbs. My largest sail is currently an 8.5 North Pyro but I
expect to get a bigger sail after I buy an early planing board.

How much earlier can I expect the Formula to plane vs the Go? (or will
the lower volume of the formula actually make it harder for someone of
my weight to plane?)

Is the 2000 Go (which I have heard has 15 liters more volume than the
1999) going to help me plane earlier (how much)?

How much faster is the formula?

Do the Formula and Go have similar wind ranges?

Is the Go with it's huge deck pad significantly more durable than the
formula if they both have the D-Ram construction?

In your experience is there another board (besides the Go and Formula)
that I should be considering?

Bob


Quote:

> PBNATHOME:
> Yes, I have sailed the Pre Production Formula 155, and now have some
time on the
> Production Formula 155.
> I only weigh 160 lbs, so my experience may be very different than
what you will
> find at 70 lbs heavier.
> Alan Bernau, who weighs over 200, will be racing one this weekend at
the
> Midwinters Regatta at Calema Boardsailing in Merritt Island FL.
> He has sailed his a bit, in 10-15 (He said he liked it alot, and in T-
Storm
> gusts
> 20-35 (he was on a 10.6 Z-1) where he was grossly overpowered. So
when he got
> in,
> he downhauled the stuffing out of the Z-1 and went back out and said
that
> besides
> being super overpowered he was enjoying the ride. For big guys, the
fin may need
> upgrading as Alan said the 58 cm spun out a few times, but I suspect
the lulls
> got him (or maybe the mega gusts). I too have managed to spin out the
58 cm
> CR-12
> that comes with the board, but it's always been sailing into much
less wind
> without
> realizing it. Push that big fin, with diminishing MFP due to the
lull, and it
> will
> come loose. Hooks right back up though.
> At only 155 liters, you are going to need about 12 knots, or a very
big sail to
> get the F155 going I think.
> Have you ever considered the RACE GO, which is only 2 cm narrower,
but has
> 30-40 liters more volume. Might make a better lite air board for
someone your
> size.
> Hope this helps, Roger

Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Before you buy.
 
 
 

Starboard Formula 155

Post by sandri.. » Fri, 03 Mar 2000 04:00:00



Quote:
> Has any one sailed one of these?  I am looking for a new board and am
weighing
> the possibilities.  I like the Seatrend Star 80 the bic Techno but,
the Formula
> 155 looks really interesting and may have a better wind range for me
(230 lbs).
>  Any input would be appreciated.

I'm 215 lbs and have an Allstar 80.  Last year, I sailed the Allstar
70.  The 80 is definitely better for my weight.  I loved the 70 but the
80 is even nicer: it planes in a bit less wind and has similar overall
range for me.  These boards plane early, are fast on all points of sail
(especially fun downwind as stuffing a rail is almost impossible), and
are very forgiving (meaning you can sail them totally powered to
overpowered and they remain correctly trimmed with very little wetted
surface without much sailor input).  I got pretty e***d about the
Starboard Formula reading Roger's posts but reading the current
Windsurfing magazines reviews of the big Allstars gave me renewed
contentment with my current board.  The reviews really rang true to my
experience.  They describe them both as having great range and the 80
as being "effortless to sail with big sails in open water and rolling
swell."  Which is, I think another angle on the "forgiving"
characteristic.  Sailing in 4 foot rollers in Lake Michigan (steep
swell close togather) in 15 knots with an 8.3, just flying off the fin,
and being as comfortable going upwind as downwind down the swell with
very little effort to keep the nose from burying defines lightwind
e***ment and is my experience that they seem to be speaking to in the
review.  The Formula 155 review seems ho-hum to me.  Read the review of
the Allstar 70.  I think its the most favorable of all the big board
reviews (>than 140liters), for what its worth.

Steve

Sent via Deja.com http://SportToday.org/
Before you buy.

 
 
 

Starboard Formula 155

Post by duboi » Sat, 04 Mar 2000 04:00:00

In the hands of a non pro I believe that the difference of speed between
the GO and the Formula 155 is barely noticeable.
The only thing I would complain about the GO is that it isn't the most  
responsive board I've tried. What I mean by that is that its
acceleration is very progressive and it reacts slowly to foot pressure.
Obviously this is understandable with a width of 83 cm, but since I
haven't tried any other board this wide I can't have a good comparison.
However, I would expect that the Formula has a faster acceleration due
to its lighter weight, but the top-end speed in under 14 knots of wind,
must be similar.
Other than that I believe the differences are minor.
The GO with the deckpad is super durable. It is made for learning,
families, schools. I've had one for a year now and it doesn't have one
dent in it. The deckpad protects a lot, thats for sure.
Hope this helps,
Francois
Quote:

> Roger,

> I am very interested in the Formula 155 and wonder how it compares to
> the Go. I am an intermediate level sailor interested in planing early
> and weigh 185 lbs. My largest sail is currently an 8.5 North Pyro but I
> expect to get a bigger sail after I buy an early planing board.

> How much earlier can I expect the Formula to plane vs the Go? (or will
> the lower volume of the formula actually make it harder for someone of
> my weight to plane?)

> Is the 2000 Go (which I have heard has 15 liters more volume than the
> 1999) going to help me plane earlier (how much)?

> How much faster is the formula?

> Do the Formula and Go have similar wind ranges?

> Is the Go with it's huge deck pad significantly more durable than the
> formula if they both have the D-Ram construction?

> In your experience is there another board (besides the Go and Formula)
> that I should be considering?

> Bob



> > PBNATHOME:
> > Yes, I have sailed the Pre Production Formula 155, and now have some
> time on the
> > Production Formula 155.
> > I only weigh 160 lbs, so my experience may be very different than
> what you will
> > find at 70 lbs heavier.
> > Alan Bernau, who weighs over 200, will be racing one this weekend at
> the
> > Midwinters Regatta at Calema Boardsailing in Merritt Island FL.
> > He has sailed his a bit, in 10-15 (He said he liked it alot, and in T-
> Storm
> > gusts
> > 20-35 (he was on a 10.6 Z-1) where he was grossly overpowered. So
> when he got
> > in,
> > he downhauled the stuffing out of the Z-1 and went back out and said
> that
> > besides
> > being super overpowered he was enjoying the ride. For big guys, the
> fin may need
> > upgrading as Alan said the 58 cm spun out a few times, but I suspect
> the lulls
> > got him (or maybe the mega gusts). I too have managed to spin out the
> 58 cm
> > CR-12
> > that comes with the board, but it's always been sailing into much
> less wind
> > without
> > realizing it. Push that big fin, with diminishing MFP due to the
> lull, and it
> > will
> > come loose. Hooks right back up though.
> > At only 155 liters, you are going to need about 12 knots, or a very
> big sail to
> > get the F155 going I think.
> > Have you ever considered the RACE GO, which is only 2 cm narrower,
> but has
> > 30-40 liters more volume. Might make a better lite air board for
> someone your
> > size.
> > Hope this helps, Roger

> Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
> Before you buy.

 
 
 

Starboard Formula 155

Post by Ellen Falle » Thu, 09 Mar 2000 04:00:00

Bob-
  I'll let Roger answer you with his thoughts, but I'm going to stick in
a few observations that I have on the subject. I have owned and used a
GO since June of 1999, in a wide range of conditions. I have now been in
possession of a Formula for 6 days, with a chance to use it on 3 of
those days (2 very light wind days,  25-35 mph day) so it will be hard
to offer any useful comparisons between the 2.
  If you get caught out on it in 25-35 mph, with the 58 cm fin, and a
6.5 m2 sail, you will do okay too. I was happy to have the stability it
provided me in reasonably hairy conditions. I suffered from not ever
having used the board before attempting such a thing (racing a new
board, new footstraps, new fin, new sail, new boom, with an old sailor).
The board was okay, but the gustiness was killing me. I would have been
better off with the mast set forward of where I had it in those
conditions.
  On the first light wind day, it planed as early as anything out there
with me and a 9.0 Retro.
  At the Midwinters, Alan Bernau, who is definitely a heavyweight, was
also using his new Formula, having previously raced a wood GO. He was
raving most enthusiastically about the Formula and what he could do on
it, and will be using it for racing in place of the GO. So, NO, the
lesser volume of the Formula will not be a factor in getting planing.
The width and general design of the board contributes a lot to its early
planing ability.
  There are other differences between the Formula and the GO which
distinguish them. The design of the tail of the Formula is different,
and it also has a different rail design. Both the wood and DRAM versions
are lighter than the GO. But I would say that the GO with the EVA deck
is probably more durable. Depends on what you are doing to it also!
  It will take me a while to really be able to compare the relative
speed of the 2 boards, especially in view of the fact that I just sold
my big sail of last year and have new and different one for this year.
I'd like to clone myself and do some head to head testing, but since
that isn't possible, I'll see if I can't find Roger and get him to do
half of the test!
  And that's my 2 cents,
Ellen
Quote:

> Roger,

> I am very interested in the Formula 155 and wonder how it compares to
> the Go. I am an intermediate level sailor interested in planing early
> and weigh 185 lbs. My largest sail is currently an 8.5 North Pyro but I
> expect to get a bigger sail after I buy an early planing board.

> How much earlier can I expect the Formula to plane vs the Go? (or will
> the lower volume of the formula actually make it harder for someone of
> my weight to plane?)

> Is the 2000 Go (which I have heard has 15 liters more volume than the
> 1999) going to help me plane earlier (how much)?

> How much faster is the formula?

> Do the Formula and Go have similar wind ranges?

> Is the Go with it's huge deck pad significantly more durable than the
> formula if they both have the D-Ram construction?

> In your experience is there another board (besides the Go and Formula)
> that I should be considering?

> Bob



> > PBNATHOME:
> > Yes, I have sailed the Pre Production Formula 155, and now have some
> time on the
> > Production Formula 155.
> > I only weigh 160 lbs, so my experience may be very different than
> what you will
> > find at 70 lbs heavier.
> > Alan Bernau, who weighs over 200, will be racing one this weekend at
> the
> > Midwinters Regatta at Calema Boardsailing in Merritt Island FL.