Simple gybe: having difficulty

Simple gybe: having difficulty

Post by Andrew Ha » Wed, 11 Sep 1996 04:00:00


I'm just starting to do my simple gybes, but I do seem to have a lot of
difficulty in getting onto a run. As hard as I try, I push the sail forward,
but the board just doesn't want to turn down wind. Any ideas what I might
be doing wrong??

Andrew

 
 
 

Simple gybe: having difficulty

Post by Scott R. Nels » Wed, 11 Sep 1996 04:00:00

Quote:

>I'm just starting to do my simple gybes, but I do seem to have a lot of
>difficulty in getting onto a run. As hard as I try, I push the sail forward,
>but the board just doesn't want to turn down wind. Any ideas what I might
>be doing wrong??

I'm assuming that you're a beginner on a long board and that you are not
planing, or even going real fast.  If not, this reply is irrelevant.

I accidentally stumbled onto a great way to jibe a longboard.  Just
flip the sail.  I don't know why it works, but reaching around the
mast to the boom on the other side and flipping the sail around causes
the board to jibe, at least far enough that you can lean the sail back
and complete the jibe.  You don't have to sink the tail or anything.
This works for me in all but the lightest breezes.

Try it and let us know what happens.

---


Sun Microsystems

BIC Astro Rock (9'4"), Alpha Cat (12'4"), wide variety of sails, etc.

 
 
 

Simple gybe: having difficulty

Post by Dave Crabb » Wed, 11 Sep 1996 04:00:00

Quote:


> >I'm just starting to do my simple gybes, but I do seem to have a lot of
> >difficulty in getting onto a run. As hard as I try, I push the sail forward,
> >but the board just doesn't want to turn down wind. Any ideas what I might
> >be doing wrong??

The difficulty sounds like you are not yet "unweighting" your feet. You
must move the sail forward and push down on the boom. Also you need to
stop pushing with your feet. You are probably unaware you are even doing
this. Once you focus on the feet thing, you might find it easier to
point downwind.

Dave

 
 
 

Simple gybe: having difficulty

Post by Tim Hoga » Wed, 11 Sep 1996 04:00:00

Dear Andrew,

I have some ideas which I hope may help, depending upon your situation.
There are several orientations which have different ways to turn downwind
the fastest.  Also, whether or not you have a daggerboard can make a lot
of difference.  Here are my ideas:

1.  If you are still pointing more upwind than downwind, lean the sail as
much toward the bow as possible.  If you board is big enough, it
definitely does not hurt to put your weight in front of the mast foot and
*shove* the front of the board downwind with your front foot.  I read
another person on this thread saying to grab the opposite side of the
boom, using the transition to force the initiation of the jibe.  This
works, for the following reason:
 It puts the clew forward, getting the center of pressure well forward (a
very exaggerated effect similar to tilting the sail forward.)  The reason
for the stronger effect is that tilting the sail only puts the small
amount of sail at the tip further downwind.  This "early transition" is OK
in light to moderate winds, but in strong winds it may be hard to retreive
the clew and sheet in on the new side.  I recommend some other tactics,
although in light winds I have also resorted to an early transition on
occasion.

2. When on approximately a beam reach (neither up nor down wind), the
above applies also.

3. When starting to go more downwind, it gets more complicated, due to the
following:
- If the winds are moderate to strong, you must step back on the board,
and tilt the sail back toward you to avoid being launched.  This prevents
the use of some techniques described in part 1.
- The effects of tilting the sail forward do not have as much effect when
you start approaching a dead run, even if you can still do this.

Therefore, you must apply two new techniques to continue your downwind
turning, and complete the jibe.  First, as I said, tilt the sail back
toward you, to maintain stability. (Keep the sail sheeted in during the
whole jibe, except during the transition itself.  This is important.)
Then, tilt the sail to the windward side of the board (to the "outside" of
the turn), moving your hands back on the boom if necessary, and balancing
with your bodyweight to the opposite side (the mast weight will start to
really pull you to the outside if you overdo - you'll see) .  This may be
enough to move the tail of the board through the eye of the wind, and you
can jibe the sail.  At the moment you jibe the sail, try to have the mast
be very nearly upright again.   As you jibe the sail (transition from one
side of the sail to the other) you should notice a sudden acceleration of
both forward speed, and rotation of the board.  Then, if you tilt the sail
way back, you will quickly find yourself on a beam reach and then upwind
on the opposite tack.

If you are still not getting enough turn, you can try to sink the tail
during the jibe, by standing as far back as possible on the board without
sinking the tail totally.  This will tighten up the turn more than you can
handle at first, but it is a lot of fun.  After the tail passes through
the eye of the wind, it may be possible to *shove* the back of the board
downwind with your feet near the back of the board to tighten up the turn
also. You can also experiment with the dagger up and down.

Regarding slow speed footsteering on a longboard, the effect is small
(IMHO) and has the opposite effect of the same foot pressure at high
speed.

I hope this helps, and have a lot of fun jibing!

Tim

 
 
 

Simple gybe: having difficulty

Post by Ronald Mariet » Thu, 12 Sep 1996 04:00:00

--
Try leaning into the turn add carving the board with your feet (like water-
skiing, carve in the direction you want to go). Don't worry about the sail
at first, just get the board carving in the correct direction to get around
the problem your having. By breaking the jibe down in steps should make it
easier.
Ron \m/  been there, done it
--
Ronald Marietta

 
 
 

Simple gybe: having difficulty

Post by NLW TFW » Thu, 12 Sep 1996 04:00:00

Your board has at least three steering wheels:
1. Sail tilt fore and aft: Tilt forward to turn downwind.
2. Sheeting angle: Sheet in to turn downwind.
3. Foot pressure: Weight the inside rail (the one you want to turn
towards) very hard if you have no daggerboard down, the outside rail if
you have a daggerboard down.

Turn all three steering wheels in the same direction, and you will turn
until your sail knocks you into the water. And that's a GOOD thing,
because it means you jibed your board successfully.

Mike \m/
Never Leave Wind To Find Wind

 
 
 

Simple gybe: having difficulty

Post by Jaime Corde » Tue, 17 Sep 1996 04:00:00

Quote:

>> >I'm just starting to do my simple gybes, but I do seem to have a lot of
>> >difficulty in getting onto a run. As hard as I try, I push the sail forward,
>> >but the board just doesn't want to turn down wind. Any ideas what I might
>> >be doing wrong??

I will also assume you are talking about non-planing jibes, presumably
on a long board, in lighter winds.

One thing I haven't seen stated explicitly is that steering is completely
different when on a run. When sailing on a broad to beam to close-hauled
reach, (i.e 45 degrees upwind from dead down wind to 45 degrees
from dead upwind) steering downwind is accomplished by leaning the sail forward.
This is the normal way of steering downwind for the normal directions
people sail in.

However, when sailing directly downwind (or close to it), steering is
accomplished by leaning the sail to *from side to side*, not forward and
aft. Lean the sail the opposite side of the direction you want to turn the board.

As you jibe, you must go through this phase of steering directly down wind.
As you sail farther downwind than 45 degrees away from dead down wind, you must
make a transition from "steer downwind by leaning the sail forward" to
"steer more downwind by leaning the sail away from the board".

Once you are sailing clew-first, flip the sail and you've made your jibe.

All the previous advice about footsteering, and other sail handling techniques
also works, but steering on a dead run is conceptually different than
"normal" steering, and I thought I'd mention it.

Hope this helps,

Jaime "A dry jibe is a good jibe" Cordera
--
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<.signature under construction>
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Simple gybe: having difficulty

Post by Don S. Baile » Thu, 19 Sep 1996 04:00:00

Quote:


> >I'm just starting to do my simple gybes, but I do seem to have a lot of
> >difficulty in getting onto a run. As hard as I try, I push the sail forward,
> >but the board just doesn't want to turn down wind. Any ideas what I might
> >be doing wrong??

> I'm assuming that you're a beginner on a long board and that you are not
> planing, or even going real fast.  If not, this reply is irrelevant.

> I accidentally stumbled onto a great way to jibe a longboard.  Just
> flip the sail.  I don't know why it works, but reaching around the
> mast to the boom on the other side and flipping the sail around causes
> the board to jibe, at least far enough that you can lean the sail back
> and complete the jibe.  You don't have to sink the tail or anything.
> This works for me in all but the lightest breezes.

> Try it and let us know what happens.

> ---


> Sun Microsystems



 
 
 

Simple gybe: having difficulty

Post by NLW TFW » Sat, 21 Sep 1996 04:00:00

Tilting your sail forward is only one of a board's three steering wheels.
The other two are sheeting angle and foot steering.
Sheeting in hard = turn downwind hard.
Pressing *** downwind rail = turn downwind if using no centerboard, or
turn upwind if using centerboard.
Crank all three steering wheels in the same effective direction = turn,
NOW.
Mike \m/
Never Leave Wind To Find Wind

 
 
 

Simple gybe: having difficulty

Post by Tom Eberhar » Sun, 22 Sep 1996 04:00:00

Hello NLW TFW (aka Mike),
I just read your post to rec.windsurfing about the gybe, and
what you wrote sounds reasonable, but english not being my mother
tongue, could you clarify what "sheeting" is and what the "downwind
rail" is?
thanks.
tom.
PS: C-C-COLD WATER IN C-C-COLORADO!!! =:0

 
 
 

Simple gybe: having difficulty

Post by NLW TFW » Sun, 22 Sep 1996 04:00:00

Tom --
Sheeting in means pulling the boom in towards your body with your back
hand.
The downwind rail is the rail (side) of your board that's downwind (as
opposed to upwind, or leeward, which is the direction the wind's coming
from. If you toss a piece of lightweight stuff in the air, it will blow
downwind.
That help?
Mike \m/
Never Leave Wind To Find Wind

 
 
 

Simple gybe: having difficulty

Post by Bill Prinzmeta » Mon, 23 Sep 1996 04:00:00

For a bunch of long board skills, including turning the board off the
wind, jibing, etc., check out my web pages on long board sailing.  
There is really too much info to type it all out here!
   http://garnet.berkeley.edu/~wprinz/