Reactor failure?

Reactor failure?

Post by Chris Schefle » Tue, 08 Aug 2000 04:00:00


I'm going to try to switch to a Reactor and see if it helps me.  My
(brand new) Da Kine seat harness buckle won't work with a Reactor.  I'm
going to go to Da Kine in Hood River tomorrow and ask for another buckle
that will work with a Reactor.

Have you ever had a reactor break on you, or heard of it?  The guy who
sold me my gear, who's an expert Gorge sailor, says he doesn't like
reactors and doesn't use them, only because they always break on him,
once even hurting his hand.  Then again, this guy sails in 50mph gusts.

Chris

Quote:

> I think you'd learn more quickly on a larger board, due to greater TOW
> (Time
> On the Water), fewer balance hassles, reduced roundup tendency, and
> better
> lull resistance. Bigger boards are cheap in your area, and there are
> probably more winds in a season there suitable to bigger boards than
> to a
> 103 liter board, especially at your skill level.

> If you could get more TOW by hooking in while standing straight up to
> relieve your arms (by using longer lines and/or lower booms), by all
> means
> do so. TOW is crucial at your stage. I can stand straight up and hook
> in
> (using care to avoid the weight on my feet going negative), yet still
> sail
> with both feet in both REAR straps on boards that have two rear strap
> positons. Yes, that means a wedgie when slogging, so if I see a need
> for
> extended slogging I lower the booms. But time spent unhooked is also
> educational because it gives you a better feel for what the sail is
> doing.

> That's where Reactor bars help. By not letting the lines grab the hook
> and
> hide harness line misplacement, they let us both better feel what the
> sail
> is trying to do and better fine tune our sheeting angle while letting
> the
> harness carry the whole sailpower load. It's like the best of both
> steering
> worlds: greater rig feel becaused of no hook friction and no net force
> on
> our arms because the pulley is supporting rig pull even while you
> change
> sheeting angle. At your stage you're sawing the rig back and forth
> like
> crazy as you change sheeting angle dynamically to maintain control and

> balance. I can't imagine using muscles (to detension the harness
> lines)
> rather than gravity and hardware and a pulley to hold up the rig while

> constantly changing sheeting angle. And with your aggressive attitude,

> you'll be B&J sailing soon, meaning CONSTANT changes in sheeting
> angle,
> meaning you'll need something other than muscle to carry the
> horsepower
> WHILE you're constantly sawing the booms back and forth.

> MIke \m/
> To reply directly, remove the SpamDam.

 
 
 

Reactor failure?

Post by RMoore » Tue, 08 Aug 2000 04:00:00

Quote:
>Have you ever had a reactor break on you, or heard of it?  

I broke two of the originals, but since then they have beefed them up to a
point where they are probably stronger than the AL stock bars. I have also
broke a couple of the stock bars also. You won't break a reactor bar.

Quote:
>I'm going to try to switch to a Reactor and see if it helps me.

I don't think going to a reactor bar will help much anymore. Originally they
worked great since back then you used longer harness lines with more span and
with a reactor bar you could slide back and forth easier due to the roller. It
also saved harness lines from wearing out quickly. Now days with shorter lines
and less span you don't really need the roller. One of the downsides of a
reactor bar is that it is easier to punch a hole in your sail and board with
it. After using a reactor bar for years, I switched back to the stock bar and
can't tell the difference.

 
 
 

Reactor failure?

Post by WARDO » Tue, 08 Aug 2000 04:00:00

I've had four of them break in two on me. They were really *** the
webbing, which is not that big a deal if you have access to an industrial
strength sewing machine and can get it replaced. After going to a
conventional spreader bar made of stainless steel, it made me wonder why I
even used Reactors in the first place. I feel like I have a much more secure
connection especially while surf sailing or jumping hooked in, after
changing back, I realized that I like the friction factor of a conventional
hook better than a roller. The argument of destroying harness lines is mute,
now that I use the Windsurfing Hawaii "***es" made with Spectra line and
bomber tubing. 2 years of hard sailing and still going strong.
http://SportToday.org/
The new sails and masts handle much better so t*** your sail is less of
an issue than it used to be, which was an advantage of the Reactor. If you
are "sawing" your booms back and forth,
then the draft could be moving around on your sail, which is indicative of
poor or older sail design, bad rigging, or mast incompatibility and no
amount of T.O.W. is going to solve that problem.
You need to make adjustments one at a time on fin placement and type, mast
track adjustment,
boom type,bend angle and height, harness line length and placement, and
footstrap placement, making mental note of the effects the adjustments had
and the conditions you were out in. You will eventually get everything
dialed in......keep after it.
WARDOG
http://SportToday.org/
Quote:

> I'm going to try to switch to a Reactor and see if it helps me.  My
> (brand new) Da Kine seat harness buckle won't work with a Reactor.  I'm
> going to go to Da Kine in Hood River tomorrow and ask for another buckle
> that will work with a Reactor.

> Have you ever had a reactor break on you, or heard of it?  The guy who
> sold me my gear, who's an expert Gorge sailor, says he doesn't like
> reactors and doesn't use them, only because they always break on him,
> once even hurting his hand.  Then again, this guy sails in 50mph gusts.

> Chris


> > I think you'd learn more quickly on a larger board, due to greater TOW
> > (Time
> > On the Water), fewer balance hassles, reduced roundup tendency, and
> > better
> > lull resistance. Bigger boards are cheap in your area, and there are
> > probably more winds in a season there suitable to bigger boards than
> > to a
> > 103 liter board, especially at your skill level.

> > If you could get more TOW by hooking in while standing straight up to
> > relieve your arms (by using longer lines and/or lower booms), by all
> > means
> > do so. TOW is crucial at your stage. I can stand straight up and hook
> > in
> > (using care to avoid the weight on my feet going negative), yet still
> > sail
> > with both feet in both REAR straps on boards that have two rear strap
> > positons. Yes, that means a wedgie when slogging, so if I see a need
> > for
> > extended slogging I lower the booms. But time spent unhooked is also
> > educational because it gives you a better feel for what the sail is
> > doing.

> > That's where Reactor bars help. By not letting the lines grab the hook
> > and
> > hide harness line misplacement, they let us both better feel what the
> > sail
> > is trying to do and better fine tune our sheeting angle while letting
> > the
> > harness carry the whole sailpower load. It's like the best of both
> > steering
> > worlds: greater rig feel becaused of no hook friction and no net force
> > on
> > our arms because the pulley is supporting rig pull even while you
> > change
> > sheeting angle. At your stage you're sawing the rig back and forth
> > like
> > crazy as you change sheeting angle dynamically to maintain control and

> > balance. I can't imagine using muscles (to detension the harness
> > lines)
> > rather than gravity and hardware and a pulley to hold up the rig while

> > constantly changing sheeting angle. And with your aggressive attitude,

> > you'll be B&J sailing soon, meaning CONSTANT changes in sheeting
> > angle,
> > meaning you'll need something other than muscle to carry the
> > horsepower
> > WHILE you're constantly sawing the booms back and forth.

> > MIke \m/
> > To reply directly, remove the SpamDam.


 
 
 

Reactor failure?

Post by Chris Schefle » Tue, 08 Aug 2000 04:00:00

Quote:

> You need to make adjustments one at a time on fin placement and type, mast
> track adjustment,
> boom type,bend angle and height, harness line length and placement, and
> footstrap placement, making mental note of the effects the adjustments had
> and the conditions you were out in.

Oh, is that all?  Sheesh!  Almost makes me want to throw  in the towel!
Nah, that's one of the things that I find so rewarding about windsurfing, that
it is so challenging.   That makes every little breakthrough that much more
rewarding.

You're the second person to mention fin placement.  I have two different
fins, and have tried both and noticed a difference.  But I don't understand
what you mean by fin placement.  I don't see any adjustability at least in
the type of fin box I have (I can't remember what type it is but its the more
popular one with the most compatability, with the curved  top of the fin).
So I don't see any possibility for adjustment in fin placement.

Well, I'm going to break down today and get a lesson on harness and straps
on a big board.  That's one thing everybody here has convinced me of (including
a couple people who've been emailing me).  I need to practice on a bigger board,

and I need a lesson.

Quote:
> You will eventually get everything
> dialed in......keep after it.

I will!  Thanks for your input.

Chris

Quote:

> WARDOG
> http://www.surfingsports.com/


> > I'm going to try to switch to a Reactor and see if it helps me.  My
> > (brand new) Da Kine seat harness buckle won't work with a Reactor.  I'm
> > going to go to Da Kine in Hood River tomorrow and ask for another buckle
> > that will work with a Reactor.

> > Have you ever had a reactor break on you, or heard of it?  The guy who
> > sold me my gear, who's an expert Gorge sailor, says he doesn't like
> > reactors and doesn't use them, only because they always break on him,
> > once even hurting his hand.  Then again, this guy sails in 50mph gusts.

> > Chris


> > > I think you'd learn more quickly on a larger board, due to greater TOW
> > > (Time
> > > On the Water), fewer balance hassles, reduced roundup tendency, and
> > > better
> > > lull resistance. Bigger boards are cheap in your area, and there are
> > > probably more winds in a season there suitable to bigger boards than
> > > to a
> > > 103 liter board, especially at your skill level.

> > > If you could get more TOW by hooking in while standing straight up to
> > > relieve your arms (by using longer lines and/or lower booms), by all
> > > means
> > > do so. TOW is crucial at your stage. I can stand straight up and hook
> > > in
> > > (using care to avoid the weight on my feet going negative), yet still
> > > sail
> > > with both feet in both REAR straps on boards that have two rear strap
> > > positons. Yes, that means a wedgie when slogging, so if I see a need
> > > for
> > > extended slogging I lower the booms. But time spent unhooked is also
> > > educational because it gives you a better feel for what the sail is
> > > doing.

> > > That's where Reactor bars help. By not letting the lines grab the hook
> > > and
> > > hide harness line misplacement, they let us both better feel what the
> > > sail
> > > is trying to do and better fine tune our sheeting angle while letting
> > > the
> > > harness carry the whole sailpower load. It's like the best of both
> > > steering
> > > worlds: greater rig feel becaused of no hook friction and no net force
> > > on
> > > our arms because the pulley is supporting rig pull even while you
> > > change
> > > sheeting angle. At your stage you're sawing the rig back and forth
> > > like
> > > crazy as you change sheeting angle dynamically to maintain control and

> > > balance. I can't imagine using muscles (to detension the harness
> > > lines)
> > > rather than gravity and hardware and a pulley to hold up the rig while

> > > constantly changing sheeting angle. And with your aggressive attitude,

> > > you'll be B&J sailing soon, meaning CONSTANT changes in sheeting
> > > angle,
> > > meaning you'll need something other than muscle to carry the
> > > horsepower
> > > WHILE you're constantly sawing the booms back and forth.

> > > MIke \m/
> > > To reply directly, remove the SpamDam.

 
 
 

Reactor failure?

Post by Den Fo » Tue, 08 Aug 2000 04:00:00

Chris,

When we discussed the merits of a roller harness, people immediately told
tales of woe about the "Reactor" brand.  There are others.  True, the
Reactor has got sharp slotted holes for the webbing strap, but other brands
are exactly like the conventional spreader bar.  I'm sure that mine is made
by Da kine, and it is very good.  It has the buckle type end so that I don't
have to re-thread each time I put it on.

Yes.  A roller hook (of any brand) is far more likely to break than a solid
steel hook.

Yes.  With a perfectly rigged sail and board, and a sailor with no bad
habits, it is unlikely that a roller hook would be necessary.

Yes I like them, and many others don't.  Only one way to find out if they
suit your needs!

Den

 
 
 

Reactor failure?

Post by Chris Schefle » Tue, 08 Aug 2000 04:00:00

Thanks, I didn't realize there were other brands.  All i've seen in the HR shops
is Reactors.  I'll try to find myself a Da Kine roller hook.  Sounds like the
best of all worlds.
Quote:

> Chris,

> When we discussed the merits of a roller harness, people immediately told
> tales of woe about the "Reactor" brand.  There are others.  True, the
> Reactor has got sharp slotted holes for the webbing strap, but other brands
> are exactly like the conventional spreader bar.  I'm sure that mine is made
> by Da kine, and it is very good.  It has the buckle type end so that I don't
> have to re-thread each time I put it on.

> Yes.  A roller hook (of any brand) is far more likely to break than a solid
> steel hook.

> Yes.  With a perfectly rigged sail and board, and a sailor with no bad
> habits, it is unlikely that a roller hook would be necessary.

> Yes I like them, and many others don't.  Only one way to find out if they
> suit your needs!

> Den

 
 
 

Reactor failure?

Post by Mike » Tue, 08 Aug 2000 04:00:00

I have never had a Reactor bar even bend, let alone break, and I use mine in
everything the Gorge can throw at me up to 9 months out of the year and
jump, crash, and get SLAMMED hooked in. I've also used them for years in New
Mexico, which blows harder than I've ever witnessed the Gorge blowing. And I
sail powered up. Yesterday, for example, I was still enjoying the 6.0 I was
too lazy to rig down from when the rest of the guys were on flattened 4.7s
and a 4.2.  I've exploded harnesses, but never hurt a Reactor bar. I HAVE
had two stainless steel hooks snap and bounce off my sail, and the sharp
stump was a disaster waiting to happen until I got to shore. ONCE, I had a
Reactor pulley bolt strip out because I sailed with it loose. I then
Loctited the next bar together better, and have used the same bar year-round
now since the mid-90s with NO maintenance.

But, then, I run the strap in front of the bar rather than put all the
stress on its little "ears", and I adjust my harness line position on the
booms very precisely so I don't need friction to compensate for misplaced
lines. This does, however, require that I must maintain a little steering
input while reaching above or below a beam reach, rather than using friction
to do this.

I run very short harness lines (the "hook" is a shaka ... 9" ... from my
booms when hooked in and under tension), yet CONSTANTLY roll the lines
through the roller as I saw the rig the rig through its ~90-degree sheeting
angle range in B&J sailing (oversheet hard against my leg to slash downwind
or initiate a jibe, sheet WAY out on the following cutback, many times per
minute). Even though slalom sailing requires a much smaller range of
sheeting angle, it does involve frequent small sheeting angle adjustments as
wind and water do their thing. I find that I can keep the rig much more
still while adjusting sheeting angle in slalom sailing if I let the pulley
carry ALL the power while I just power steer with fingertip pressure. The
one time I tried a non-roller hook in the last decade, it felt like my
harness line had fouled the hook because it wouldn't let me change sheeting
angle freely unless I pulled on the booms to slacken the lines.

I know many sailors who feel as I do: the roller bar is the single most
important piece of windsurfing equipment we own. But since some here have
tried them long enough to get used to them and have gone back to hooks,
there must be room for personal preference. So ... like everything else in
this sport ... try both long enough to give each a fair trial.

Mike \m/
To reply directly, remove the SpamDam.


Quote:
> I'm going to try to switch to a Reactor and see if it helps me.  My
> (brand new) Da Kine seat harness buckle won't work with a Reactor.  I'm
> going to go to Da Kine in Hood River tomorrow and ask for another buckle
> that will work with a Reactor.

> Have you ever had a reactor break on you, or heard of it?  The guy who
> sold me my gear, who's an expert Gorge sailor, says he doesn't like
> reactors and doesn't use them, only because they always break on him,
> once even hurting his hand.  Then again, this guy sails in 50mph gusts.

 
 
 

Reactor failure?

Post by Mike » Tue, 08 Aug 2000 04:00:00

The last DaKine roller bar I saw was a Reactor bar with a DaKine logo
slapped on it. Maybe that's changed since '96.

Mike \m/
To reply directly, remove the SpamDam.

Quote:
> Thanks, I didn't realize there were other brands.  All i've seen in the HR
shops
> is Reactors.  I'll try to find myself a Da Kine roller hook.  Sounds like
the
> best of all worlds.

 
 
 

Reactor failure?

Post by Loco4wi » Tue, 08 Aug 2000 04:00:00

Quote:
>So ... like everything else in
>this sport ... try both long enough to give each a fair trial.

Bars are relatively inexpensive, and I agree fully with this.

I've used a reactor bar for several years. I had one break very early one, but
not since, although I have had to replace it twice when I stupidly left my
harness at the beach. I sail bump and jump and waves, and love the reactor bar.

In terms of wearing on the straps, I use the method Mike does of running the
strap over the reactor bar and have no major problems with this.

Compared with my days of sailing a hook bar, I note no differences in strap
wear and also no greater failure rate. (I broke a few of those too)

 
 
 

Reactor failure?

Post by Rainma » Tue, 08 Aug 2000 04:00:00

I've been using the Reactor bar for years too..  Never had any problems with
it, never had one break, I wear out sails and boards, but never a Reactor
bar.

 Would'nt sail without one.

  R.

--
Website: www.botanybay.cjb.net


: >So ... like everything else in
: >this sport ... try both long enough to give each a fair trial.
:
: Bars are relatively inexpensive, and I agree fully with this.
:
: I've used a reactor bar for several years. I had one break very early one,
but
: not since, although I have had to replace it twice when I stupidly left my
: harness at the beach. I sail bump and jump and waves, and love the reactor
bar.
:
: In terms of wearing on the straps, I use the method Mike does of running
the
: strap over the reactor bar and have no major problems with this.
:
: Compared with my days of sailing a hook bar, I note no differences in
strap
: wear and also no greater failure rate. (I broke a few of those too)

 
 
 

Reactor failure?

Post by Ellen Falle » Wed, 09 Aug 2000 04:00:00

I've been using a Reactor bar for so long I can't remember when I began.
My first one was white, and I only retired it because a lot of the paint
had come off and I thought maybe it was a good idea to get a new one
just in case age was a factor. The new one is at least 5 years old. I
run the straps in from the back and across the outside of the front.
There is only a little wear on the straps where they go thru the
openings.
  I'm not a Gorge sailor but I give my harness a lot of use. The Reactor
bar is almost like part of me now and I can't imagine sailing without
one.
  Ellen
Quote:

> I have never had a Reactor bar even bend, let alone break, and I use mine in
> everything the Gorge can throw at me up to 9 months out of the year and
> jump, crash, and get SLAMMED hooked in. I've also used them for years in New
> Mexico, which blows harder than I've ever witnessed the Gorge blowing. And I
> sail powered up. Yesterday, for example, I was still enjoying the 6.0 I was
> too lazy to rig down from when the rest of the guys were on flattened 4.7s
> and a 4.2.  I've exploded harnesses, but never hurt a Reactor bar. I HAVE
> had two stainless steel hooks snap and bounce off my sail, and the sharp
> stump was a disaster waiting to happen until I got to shore. ONCE, I had a
> Reactor pulley bolt strip out because I sailed with it loose. I then
> Loctited the next bar together better, and have used the same bar year-round
> now since the mid-90s with NO maintenance.

> But, then, I run the strap in front of the bar rather than put all the
> stress on its little "ears", and I adjust my harness line position on the
> booms very precisely so I don't need friction to compensate for misplaced
> lines. This does, however, require that I must maintain a little steering
> input while reaching above or below a beam reach, rather than using friction
> to do this.

> I run very short harness lines (the "hook" is a shaka ... 9" ... from my
> booms when hooked in and under tension), yet CONSTANTLY roll the lines
> through the roller as I saw the rig the rig through its ~90-degree sheeting
> angle range in B&J sailing (oversheet hard against my leg to slash downwind
> or initiate a jibe, sheet WAY out on the following cutback, many times per
> minute). Even though slalom sailing requires a much smaller range of
> sheeting angle, it does involve frequent small sheeting angle adjustments as
> wind and water do their thing. I find that I can keep the rig much more
> still while adjusting sheeting angle in slalom sailing if I let the pulley
> carry ALL the power while I just power steer with fingertip pressure. The
> one time I tried a non-roller hook in the last decade, it felt like my
> harness line had fouled the hook because it wouldn't let me change sheeting
> angle freely unless I pulled on the booms to slacken the lines.

> I know many sailors who feel as I do: the roller bar is the single most
> important piece of windsurfing equipment we own. But since some here have
> tried them long enough to get used to them and have gone back to hooks,
> there must be room for personal preference. So ... like everything else in
> this sport ... try both long enough to give each a fair trial.

> Mike \m/
> To reply directly, remove the SpamDam.


> > I'm going to try to switch to a Reactor and see if it helps me.  My
> > (brand new) Da Kine seat harness buckle won't work with a Reactor.  I'm
> > going to go to Da Kine in Hood River tomorrow and ask for another buckle
> > that will work with a Reactor.

> > Have you ever had a reactor break on you, or heard of it?  The guy who
> > sold me my gear, who's an expert Gorge sailor, says he doesn't like
> > reactors and doesn't use them, only because they always break on him,
> > once even hurting his hand.  Then again, this guy sails in 50mph gusts.

 
 
 

Reactor failure?

Post by Pave » Thu, 10 Aug 2000 04:00:00

Anybody have a solution for a Dakine Speed Seat in which the buckle keeps
slipping unexpectedly on the reactor bar? I have the plastic version which
just does not seem to close properly

-P


Quote:
> I've been using a Reactor bar for so long I can't remember when I began.
> My first one was white, and I only retired it because a lot of the paint
> had come off and I thought maybe it was a good idea to get a new one
> just in case age was a factor. The new one is at least 5 years old. I
> run the straps in from the back and across the outside of the front.
> There is only a little wear on the straps where they go thru the
> openings.
>   I'm not a Gorge sailor but I give my harness a lot of use. The Reactor
> bar is almost like part of me now and I can't imagine sailing without
> one.
>   Ellen


> > I have never had a Reactor bar even bend, let alone break, and I use
mine in
> > everything the Gorge can throw at me up to 9 months out of the year and
> > jump, crash, and get SLAMMED hooked in. I've also used them for years in
New
> > Mexico, which blows harder than I've ever witnessed the Gorge blowing.
And I
> > sail powered up. Yesterday, for example, I was still enjoying the 6.0 I
was
> > too lazy to rig down from when the rest of the guys were on flattened
4.7s
> > and a 4.2.  I've exploded harnesses, but never hurt a Reactor bar. I
HAVE
> > had two stainless steel hooks snap and bounce off my sail, and the sharp
> > stump was a disaster waiting to happen until I got to shore. ONCE, I had
a
> > Reactor pulley bolt strip out because I sailed with it loose. I then
> > Loctited the next bar together better, and have used the same bar
year-round
> > now since the mid-90s with NO maintenance.

> > But, then, I run the strap in front of the bar rather than put all the
> > stress on its little "ears", and I adjust my harness line position on
the
> > booms very precisely so I don't need friction to compensate for
misplaced
> > lines. This does, however, require that I must maintain a little
steering
> > input while reaching above or below a beam reach, rather than using
friction
> > to do this.

> > I run very short harness lines (the "hook" is a shaka ... 9" ... from my
> > booms when hooked in and under tension), yet CONSTANTLY roll the lines
> > through the roller as I saw the rig the rig through its ~90-degree
sheeting
> > angle range in B&J sailing (oversheet hard against my leg to slash
downwind
> > or initiate a jibe, sheet WAY out on the following cutback, many times
per
> > minute). Even though slalom sailing requires a much smaller range of
> > sheeting angle, it does involve frequent small sheeting angle
adjustments as
> > wind and water do their thing. I find that I can keep the rig much more
> > still while adjusting sheeting angle in slalom sailing if I let the
pulley
> > carry ALL the power while I just power steer with fingertip pressure.
The
> > one time I tried a non-roller hook in the last decade, it felt like my
> > harness line had fouled the hook because it wouldn't let me change
sheeting
> > angle freely unless I pulled on the booms to slacken the lines.

> > I know many sailors who feel as I do: the roller bar is the single most
> > important piece of windsurfing equipment we own. But since some here
have
> > tried them long enough to get used to them and have gone back to hooks,
> > there must be room for personal preference. So ... like everything else
in
> > this sport ... try both long enough to give each a fair trial.

> > Mike \m/
> > To reply directly, remove the SpamDam.


> > > I'm going to try to switch to a Reactor and see if it helps me.  My
> > > (brand new) Da Kine seat harness buckle won't work with a Reactor.
I'm
> > > going to go to Da Kine in Hood River tomorrow and ask for another
buckle
> > > that will work with a Reactor.

> > > Have you ever had a reactor break on you, or heard of it?  The guy who
> > > sold me my gear, who's an expert Gorge sailor, says he doesn't like
> > > reactors and doesn't use them, only because they always break on him,
> > > once even hurting his hand.  Then again, this guy sails in 50mph

gusts.
 
 
 

Reactor failure?

Post by Mike » Thu, 10 Aug 2000 04:00:00

Warranty, if it's not old. New strap if it is old. They had problems with
this in the mid-90s. I'd think any shoe repair shop could do the work oce
you find the right webbing from an outdoor outfitter such as REI. Try DaKine
directly; they'd probably rehab it very cheaply.

Mike \m/
To reply directly, remove the SpamDam.

 
 
 

Reactor failure?

Post by RMoore » Thu, 10 Aug 2000 04:00:00

Quote:
>Anybody have a solution for a Dakine Speed Seat in which the buckle keeps
>slipping unexpectedly on the reactor bar? I have the plastic version which
>just does not seem to close properly

I tell you after owning a bunch of harnesses over the years with a variety of
buckle systems. I have a newer Dakine speed seat with the new buckle system, it
is primo and never slips and there is no hinge to catch and open up. Get one of
these and your harness problems will go away immediately
 
 
 

Reactor failure?

Post by Surfpi » Thu, 10 Aug 2000 04:00:00

Quote:
>>Anybody have a solution for a Dakine Speed Seat in which the buckle keeps
>>slipping unexpectedly on the reactor bar? I have the plastic version which
>>just does not seem to close properly

    I also have a Dakine Speed Seat with the plastic buckle that slips.  Dakine
sent me one of the new buckles no charge. They also sent one to a buddy of mine
that had the same problem no charge. It is fairly simple to retrofit it to the
harness. One side of the harness strap threads through the one buckle. The
other side has to be sewn on in place of the plastic buckle. I did the sewing
myself but like Mike said, any shoe repair shop could do the job easily for
only a couple of bucks.

    Lou P