Duck Jibes

Duck Jibes

Post by Jonathan M. Richards » Fri, 10 May 1991 06:04:28



writes:

Quote:

>        Equipment in general seems to be occupying too much of rec.windsurfing
>for my tastes - how about more stuff on DOING IT?  How 'bout that duck jibe
>for example?

One question I've always had about learning duck jibes is how to do it safely.
It seems that when the clew passes in front of your face, you might fall on it.
Ouch!

Any Comments?

-Jthan.

 
 
 

Duck Jibes

Post by e.. » Fri, 10 May 1991 03:39:29

        Equipment in general seems to be occupying too much of rec.windsurfing
for my tastes - how about more stuff on DOING IT?  How 'bout that duck jibe
for example?
        Well, I've managed to pull off about a dozen in my life so far, but
I'd like to be able to rip off a clean duck at least 90% of the time.  Any
veteran duck jibers out there to offer some advice?  I'm pretty sure I have
the motion down pat, i.e. the smooth, quick duck and pulloff with the back
hand.  However, timing seems to still be my main problem.  Invariably, I do it
too early or too late in the turn, and I either get backwinded, or slammed.
        Some easy to remember suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
        P.S. I can offer some good advice on helicopter tacks, as I just
figured out how to make them possible for mere mortals.

        -Tim Ebling



 
 
 

Duck Jibes

Post by Micky Balladel » Sat, 25 May 1991 05:22:03

|>   Well, I've managed to pull off about a dozen in my life so far, but
|> I'd like to be able to rip off a clean duck at least 90% of the time.  Any
|> veteran duck jibers out there to offer some advice?  I'm pretty sure I have
|> the motion down pat, i.e. the smooth, quick duck and pulloff with the back
|> hand.  However, timing seems to still be my main problem.  Invariably, I do it
|> too early or too late in the turn, and I either get backwinded, or slammed.
|>   Some easy to remember suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
|>   P.S. I can offer some good advice on helicopter tacks, as I just
|> figured out how to make them possible for mere mortals.

I guess concentration is the key. Duck jibes require the board to smoothly turn eventually using
the feet to control it and the body and arms to catch that particular moment when the sail can
be pulled off.
My personal experience in duck jibing proves me that 'it ain't going to pass' just because I
managed a few previously. I have to keep concentration to catch that particular moment and
it's not easy. But that is my experience and I'm sure there are people out there that can do much
better and probably have a better feeling with less concentration.

I remember  there are times where I just don't duck jibe anymore because of different reasons
and when I finally want to do it again I lose the 'trick' (or the habit, or the feeling) and it takes
time to come back.

One positive thing about duck jibing, is that it help me  improving jibing, I have the feeling that
they are much more smooth now, anyone else had the same feeling?

Cheers,

Micky

Re: Ps.  I'll be interested in anything about tacks since this is the thing I'm working on  hard
right now.

 
 
 

Duck Jibes

Post by Serge Rezzo » Sun, 12 May 1991 00:05:23

Yes, an advice on HELICOPTER TACK would be welcome !

I got a short group-lesson in light wind, and learned NOSE TACK, no problem.
Then the instructor showed us the HELICOPTER, but I wasn't able to do the same:
as I shifted the sail through the wind I went into a quick spin and ...

-Serge

 
 
 

Duck Jibes

Post by Steve Made » Fri, 31 May 1991 04:10:39

What exactly is a Helicopter Tack?  I've tried to imagine tacking
a board and letting the sail support my body weight while I swing
around the bow but it seems impossible.  Do you head up drastically and
then lean over on TOP of the sail?  Every other configuration seems like
it would result in being backwinded.  Once you have swung around the front
of the board, it seems like the sail would be oriented backwards and
tilted to leeward.  How in the world would one get out of that situation
gracefully?

Could someone describe this maneuver?
I have just gotten down my power gybes and am ready to
move on to something else.
Once we know what it is, it would be great to get some advice
on how to actually do one.

 
 
 

Duck Jibes

Post by Kent Mult » Sat, 01 Jun 1991 04:39:12


Quote:
> What exactly is a Helicopter Tack?  [text deleted]

Yes, it DOES involve getting backwinded.  (This is hard to explain without
pictures; go rent a video.  However, ...)  Suppose you're sailing on the
port tack (left hand forward).  You head upwind by turning left, and just keep
turning right on through the dead-upwind position until the wind goes around
to the other side of the sail.  At that time you will be pushing, instead of
pulling, on the boom.  Continue turning left, then flip the sail by pushing
with your right hand, so that the back of the sail goes through the upwind
point.  Then the wind will be back on your side of the sail.  Let go with
the right hand, and the sail will turn on around to the left.  Do some jibe-
like hand moves to get a grip on the other side of the boom, and away you go.

There's a lot more to it, having to do with sail control and foot pressure to
make sure you go around smoothly, and don't end up going backwards.  It will
be helpful to spend some time sailing backwinded, and learn how to steer in
that mode.  Have fun!

 
 
 

Duck Jibes

Post by Tom Alber » Fri, 31 May 1991 22:17:26

What exactly is a Helicopter Tack?

    I don't know for sure how the manoeuvre is done, but I know it is
    described in the "Short Board Sailing Technique" video.  Watching
    the video will be better help than anyone could possibly give in
    this notes string, anyway.

    I think you rotate the sail with you when you cross over the front,
    which results in the sail backward on the new tack.  You then jibe
    the sail and power off.

 
 
 

Duck Jibes

Post by Kirk Lindstr » Sun, 02 Jun 1991 01:36:18

For you Calif sailors, Roger ??, head instructor at Shoreline, describes this
move with pictures in this month's issue of "California Sailboard"
(or is it now windsurfing??).  The magazine is one of those free ones found
at the door of shops.

-Kirk out
9'9" Velocity, 8'8" Challange Flex & 11'6" Malibu, looking for a 9'2" 120L??
Wt 99 Kg, Ht. 6'0", Home water => Coyote Pt, SF Bay, Cailf.