Landing B&J Waves

Landing B&J Waves

Post by Dunca » Wed, 30 Aug 1995 04:00:00


Recently I found my foot straps and all is well!  Well almost..., now it
seems that when I get a little air off of those Gorge swells I land and
immediately spin out. What do I do?  I am 180, have a 9'4" Seatrend use a
13" pointer,and generally am pointing fairly high when I hit the wave.
 
 
 

Landing B&J Waves

Post by Josh Stillerm » Wed, 30 Aug 1995 04:00:00

|>Recently I found my foot straps and all is well!  Well almost..., now it
|>seems that when I get a little air off of those Gorge swells I land and
|>immediately spin out. What do I do?  I am 180, have a 9'4" Seatrend use a
|>13" pointer,and generally am pointing fairly high when I hit the wave.
|>
|>
Bear off when you are in the air.  The board will tend to want to head up when
you leave the water.

josh

 
 
 

Landing B&J Waves

Post by mulio.. » Wed, 30 Aug 1995 04:00:00


Quote:
>Recently I found my foot straps and all is well!  Well almost..., now it
>seems that when I get a little air off of those Gorge swells I land and
>immediately spin out. What do I do?  I am 180, have a 9'4" Seatrend use a
>13" pointer,and generally am pointing fairly high when I hit the wave.

Basically what you have to do is sheat in in the air, bend your back leg and
straighten your front leg, and turn your board a little off the wind for your
landing. You are spinning out because while you are in the air, the wind
is still pushing you, and it changes your direction of travel without changing
the attitude of your board. The effect of this is that your board is not pointing
in the direction it is moving, thus the spin out. You have to adjust for this in the
air by turning more downwind.

Congratulations! Because of the conditions here on Lake Erie, it wasn't until
about a year after I learned to use my footstraps that I started chop hopping.

Take off!
Let's see some fin!



 
 
 

Landing B&J Waves

Post by NLW TFW » Wed, 30 Aug 1995 04:00:00

When you rentire hull is in the air, even by inches in the air, you're now
flying downwind to some degree. Look down: the water is now flowing by at
quite an angle compared to where your board is pointing. This puts too
much load on the fin, and it breaks loose (spins out). You must turn the
board in the air until it is pointed roughly in the direction you're
actually moving relative to the water. This takes the load off the fin,
and it's especially important with sharp-railed boards like yours.

Here's how you accomplish that, at your present stage. Any time you think
you may have gotten even a little air, pull your back foot (keeping it in
the strap) under/behind you (towards its heel, or upwind). That does two
things:
1. It pulls the board's tail upwind, forcing its nose off the wind as it
pivots around your front foot (in its strap) and/or the mast foot.
2. Because your back knee flexed, the sole of that foot and thus the
bottom of the board are now exposed to the wind (the upwind rail is
raised). The wind then pushes the unburdened nose downwind, where you want
it to be. It's like power steering: a little knee-flex effort exposes the
hull bottom to the wind, and the wind then does most of the work.

If in fact the hull had not cleared the water when you though it had and
pulled the rear foot back, no harm done, and nothing will happen. If the
hull was clear and if the fin was not, you'll still turn off the wind like
you should. Just create this habit: When you think you may have gotten
air, pull the rear foot (and strap) back.

Your life will never be the same.

Once you've mastered that, then start aiding that process by raising the
front leg at the hip as you let that knee bend, thus pulling the front
foot (in its strap) up, thus raising the upwind rail even more. Greater
power steering, greater effect, greater possibilities.

Just don't jump with the TOP of the hull exposed to the wind (the upwind
rail pushed down below the downwind rail. The upwind side of your head
won't appreciate its impact with the water.

Which reminds me: use a turnier board when you start learning jibes. Yours
is a marvelous board for its intent, but its intent does not include
learning to carve jibes. You'll learn in 1/5 the time on a basic, classic,
forgiving, parallel-rail, wave-slalom board. They're cheap now, as most
people have joined the no-nose trend and abandoned the boards that got
them where they are now.

Good luck.
Mike \m/