Learn windsurfing faster: Read (long)

Learn windsurfing faster: Read (long)

Post by NLW TFW » Mon, 04 Sep 1995 04:00:00


This may sound preachy, but I'll risk that in case it helps someone enjoy
our sport more and advance more rapidly. We need all the help we can get
to master a sport as challenging and complicated as this one. Finishing
college took less effort and time than learning how to carve jibes,
especially before instruction was available from friends, instructors, or
media.

If school requires reading, why shouldn't an extremely challenging sport
require reading? I get the impression from the questions they ask that
many rec dot windsufing contributors don't read windsurfing books or
magazines, or at least the how-to articles in them. The following
questions from the Net and the beach support this impression, because most
of these questions have been subjects of entire articles or even whole
books in recent years:
How do I jibe?
How do I water start?
What's the perfect board for me?
Where can I windsurf?
Is there any way to restore deck traction?
Will any fins shed weeds?
Do wave fins turn better than race fins?
Can I sail a short board?
Should I buy a race board to learn how to jibe?
How do I handle being overpowered?
Will very long or short mast extensions break masts?
Does titanium help in suits?
100 Gorge questions, already addressed in 100 Gorge articles, such as "Is
there camping in the Gorge?"
100 other location questions, answered in 100 articles.
Is my 8-yr-old sail as good as a '95 sail?
Does it matter if my fin is about to fall out of the slot?
At an experts-only Gorge site, on a near-nuke day, from a guy all rigged
on a 9' slalom board: "Where do I launch for learning how to jibe?"

By now you're angry that I'd belittle ignorant questions and novice
questioners. But that's not my purpose at all; there are no stupid
questions, and the only way to get answers is to ask questions. My real
concern is what these questions indicate: MANY SAILORS DON'T READ
INFORMATIVE ARTICLES, AND ARE THUS HOLDING BACK THEIR LEARNING CURVE
TREMENDOUSLY. If that's a conscious choice -- if they'd rather hinder
their learning curve than read -- that's their business. And if forum
readers choose to -- or not to -- take their online time and money to
answer questions that have been answered at great length in many
magazines, books, and tapes, that's those readers' business. Readers will
usually find much more thorough answers in the media than on the Net
because of the time and effort required to generate them.

Obviously, many forum readers, myself included, don't mind answering easy
questions. Hell, they're the only kind I can answer. But usually the
magazines answer them better and more thoroughly, and throw in another 100
answers for good measure. Take it from someone who has been sailing since
before windsurfing mags and videos and instruction and even other local
sailors were available: advancing without using all the sources of
knowledge available is a painfully slow process.

People who read more learn more, progress faster, and probably have more
fun sooner. 10,000 sailors could write excellent jibe instructions, but it
would take hours to write them well enough to add anything -- if anything
could be added -- to the excellent tomes and photo sequences in
Windsurfing mag and the British Windsurf mag.

So why would anyone even want to ask a question that broad on the internet
that is addressed so well in print? There are many valid reasons to ask
any question, such as being too new to know where else to look, needing an
answer NOW and not knowing where to find it in the mags, wanting a
different slant than has appeared in print, wanting a majority opinion,
wanting more info than a mag offered, or not believing what they read in
mags.

But each internet query gets an answer to only one question, usually. Yet
any one mag answers many of the questions appearing on the Net, so people
relying on the Net for their windsurfing education are moving very, very
slowly. Life's too short, and windsurfing's too complicated, for that.

In life and work as in school, ya gotta do your homework to get ahead. In
doing your homework, i.e., reading magazines, you will learn much more
about many of these common issues, and about many more questions you
didn't know enough to ask.

I don't want to DIScourage any questions; I want to ENcourage sailors to
read more in addition to surfing rec.windsurfing. It helps a challenging
sport progress faster. I wish there had been more books and mags and
videos, or at least rec.windsurfing, when I started. Maybe then I'd have
known better than to buy a much bigger, longer, heavier board for use in
higher winds after I outgrew my first board. Apparently none of the 15
dealers I phoned had heard of "short boards", and that was in my fourth
year of windsurfing.

Now, while you're here, can you tell me how to ski?

Mike \m/

 
 
 

Learn windsurfing faster: Read (long)

Post by DenPra » Fri, 08 Sep 1995 04:00:00


questions of Rec.Windsurfing, when they could get better, more complete
information by reading articles in magazines, watching videos, reading
books, etc., that are excellent, available, and informative.

When I first came onto this newsgroup, my first post was 'Where are the
FAQs?'  (The answer seemed to be 'There are none available'?)  Such FAQs
would help newbies like myself to find the right beginner articles, the
best beginner videos, the appropriate beginner texts, etc.  

I think that Mike's note would be a good addition to such a FAQ.  I think
his list of repetative questions would be good chapters.  What is missing
are the appropriate pointers to get the answers.

We could expand this FAQ with summaries of discussions (such as the
excellent summary of the Right Of Way - Collisions discussions).

As a newbie, I agree wholeheartedly with Mike that it is up to us newbies
to educate ourselves.  I would like to!  A FAQ describing the best next
steps for newbies to take (so as not to burden the the net) would help.

Is there a way for us to start compiling a FAQ?  I will help -- can
someone lead?

Best,
Dennis

 
 
 

Learn windsurfing faster: Read (long)

Post by Sting-a-ling-a-ding-do » Sat, 09 Sep 1995 04:00:00


Quote:


>questions of Rec.Windsurfing, when they could get better, more complete
>information by reading articles in magazines, watching videos, reading
>books, etc., that are excellent, available, and informative.

>When I first came onto this newsgroup, my first post was 'Where are the
>FAQs?'  (The answer seemed to be 'There are none available'?)  Such FAQs
>would help newbies like myself to find the right beginner articles, the
>best beginner videos, the appropriate beginner texts, etc.  

> [stuff deleted]

>Is there a way for us to start compiling a FAQ?  I will help -- can
>someone lead?

    Well I do not have a FAQ compiled but I do have a series of technique
articles available for everyones perusal.  They cover basic and intermediate
skills.  I am currently working on writing more advanced skill articles but
they are more complicated at times.

    The URL if anyone is intersted is http://www.ultranet.com/~lefebvre.  This
is my homepage which from there look for a pointer to "Technique Articles".  I
hope you find them helpful and let me know what you think.

Quote:
>Best,
>Dennis

---
+----------------------------+------------------------------+-----------------+


|Electronic Systems Division |          (US-775)            |                 |
|Raytheon, Marlborough, Mass | "I'd rather be Windsurfing!" |   M/S 2-2-2805  |
+----------------------------+------------------------------+-----------------+
|  BIG Certified Instructor  | My homepage: http://www.ultranet.com/~lefebvre |
+---Seatrend----Neil-Pryde---+----Rainbow-Fins----Bare---------Fiberspar------+

 
 
 

Learn windsurfing faster: Read (long)

Post by Linda Lenar » Sun, 10 Sep 1995 04:00:00

Quote:

>questions of Rec.Windsurfing, when they could get better, more complete
>information by reading articles in magazines, watching videos, reading
>books, etc., that are excellent, available, and informative.

That would be a good idea if the information were available locally.  
I've taken lessons, searched the local bookstores for books and
magazines.  The selection of books was very limited and the only magazine
I could find was mostly ads.  

Quote:
>When I first came onto this newsgroup, my first post was 'Where are the
>FAQs?'  (The answer seemed to be 'There are none available'?)  Such FAQs
>would help newbies like myself to find the right beginner articles, the
>best beginner videos, the appropriate beginner texts, etc.  

That is an excellent idea and would be of help to me if it included
information on how to go about acquiring a board for oneself.  Perhaps a
discussion of what to look for when buying your first set of equipment.

Quote:
>As a newbie, I agree wholeheartedly with Mike that it is up to us >newbies to educate ourselves.  I would like to!  A FAQ describin=

g the >best next steps for newbies to take (so as not to burden the the net) >would help.

Quote:
>Is there a way for us to start compiling a FAQ?  I will help -- can
>someone lead?

And perhaps to go along with the FAQ, a Web site for beginners to go to
find the FAQ and other windsurfing links.  I've seen a few Web sites, but
they seem to be mostly for travel adverti***ts.

Linda

 
 
 

Learn windsurfing faster: Read (long)

Post by Charles We » Sun, 10 Sep 1995 04:00:00


Quote:
>Now, while you're here, can you tell me how to ski?

Good post.  You're better off on a snowboard.  Less technical than
skiing.  Much easier than windsurfing.  The secret is lots of speed
and bank your turns.  Falling on the inside of a turn is OK; the other
way hurts a lot.
BTW I have a CSIA LevelI so I could have answered your real question
it just would have taken too long.
Cheers.:)  
 
 
 

Learn windsurfing faster: Read (long)

Post by j.. » Mon, 11 Sep 1995 04:00:00

Quote:


>>questions of Rec.Windsurfing, when they could get better, more complete
>>information by reading articles in magazines, watching videos, reading
>>books, etc., that are excellent, available, and informative.
>That would be a good idea if the information were available locally.  
>I've taken lessons, searched the local bookstores for books and
>magazines.  The selection of books was very limited and the only magazine
>I could find was mostly ads.  
>>When I first came onto this newsgroup, my first post was 'Where are the
>>FAQs?'  (The answer seemed to be 'There are none available'?)  Such FAQs
>>would help newbies like myself to find the right beginner articles, the
>>best beginner videos, the appropriate beginner texts, etc.  
>That is an excellent idea and would be of help to me if it included
>information on how to go about acquiring a board for oneself.  Perhaps a
>discussion of what to look for when buying your first set of equipment.
>>As a newbie, I agree wholeheartedly with Mike that it is up to us >newbies to educate ourselves.  I would like to!  A FAQ describin=
>g the >best next steps for newbies to take (so as not to burden the the net) >would help.
>>Is there a way for us to start compiling a FAQ?  I will help -- can
>>someone lead?
>And perhaps to go along with the FAQ, a Web site for beginners to go to
>find the FAQ and other windsurfing links.  I've seen a few Web sites, but
>they seem to be mostly for travel adverti***ts.
>Linda

Let's face it........windsurfing is not as popular as tennis and
baseball......and many newbies really don't have any source from which
to get information about the sport.   Why don't we use this tremendous
medium (the internet) to help each other and newbies, rather than act
bothered by the simple questions that newbies ask.   When we take a
"you're wasting my precious time with your simple, repetitive
questions attidtude", we are also sending the message that this is  an
elitist sport.   One of the problems with this sport is that attitude.
Things should change.   Unless you really like being by yourself out
there on the water, maybe a little patience with new windsurfers would
bring more good people into the sport.
Personally, I think Linda was being too nice in her replies.   Let her
ask any and all simple questions on here.  That's what this if for.
I've seen recaps posted on here talking about what a nice time people
had here and there while windsurfing.......these are interesting, but
have not contributed an iota to my knowledge of the sport.
Nonetheless, I welcome these posts, just as I do those from newbies.
Anyone else think there is a significant minority of windsurfers on
here who are just too good at the sport to be bothered with beginners?
(Note the sarcasm- Please!)