spoilers?

spoilers?

Post by Zephy » Thu, 28 Sep 2006 04:08:29


Quote:

> Dave:

> I only do this way OP'd with F board and big sail on flat water.  I do not
> have enough control or skill to do it when there is much chop.

> I'm a bit confused - if  I'm moving forward at 20+ kts - not sliding across
> the surface of the water - what is the leeward rail going to catch on?

> I have been slammed many times - but I guess I have a feel for this and
> riding thru the gust (while a act of faith at first) causes far fewer high
> speed crashes than sheeting out.

> Tom - Chicago.

Tom,

I get concearned when I am way powered and the board is up out of the
water,  I can look and see air between the board and the water all the
way back to my front foot.
If I'm bearing off just a bit my leeward edge is going to be catching
the backside of any chop before the rest of the board. So if the nose
starts to bounce due to chop or me letting up at all even for a second
due to a gust if the nose drops down at the same time chop comes up, I
get nerveous.    I'm not talking large chop either,  maybe just a few
inches tall at most and if I can get a really flat section of water I
don't worry.

Do you run longer or shorter harness lines?  Reading the thread on
harness lines I'm curious if my somewhat shorter lines and  more
upright stance are what is making me  
more nerveous.  

Dave

 
 
 

spoilers?

Post by Cliff Fros » Thu, 28 Sep 2006 05:04:14

Exactly, training for formula racing.

I also enjoy taking my formula board out for long distance
sailing, and in the San Francisco bay that can mean you
pass through several different wind and surface conditions.

It's a lot of fun to challenge yourself this way.  The
boards and gear can indeed be sailed for fun in heavy weather,
but require that everything be set up properly (eg, mast track
placement, boom height, harness lines, etc).  

To survive you have to be using your weight in the harness and not the
strength of your arms--this is good technique with any gear,
but with the big stuff you get punished more for poor technique.

I've found that the formula training has helped my small board
sailing immensely.  I still can't race worth a damn, I fail to
finish most of the races I enter, but I'm not a very competitive
person and don't care all that much.  

I just want to sail more, sail better, and have fun.  I also sail
an exocet 117 liter board and a starboard evo 92.  When it's blowing
hard I just pick one of my three boards and go have fun.

  Cheers,
          Cliff

Quote:

> Please don't take this as a flip remark, but can you guys
> talk a little about why you sail such big equipment in 20mph
> wind?    This Sunday it was blowing 18>22  and I was fully
> powered on 88litres (Mistral Stinger circa 1992) and 5.0 Ezzy.
> Are you training for a formula race and just don't have the option
> of a smaller board?   I've got a *board175 and can't even walk
> it to the beach in a 20mph wind 8^)
> BF


 
 
 

spoilers?

Post by sm.. » Thu, 28 Sep 2006 05:53:09

Quote:
> Do you run longer or shorter harness lines?  Reading the thread on
> harness lines I'm curious if my somewhat shorter lines and  more
> upright stance are what is making me
> more nerveous.

> Dave

As a general rule for formula, I have found that I run my lines as
short as they will go all the time on all points of sail up until the
point that I start to get heavily overpowered on flat water upwind with
the outhaul set to maximum flat.  Somewhere around this time, I will
probably begin easing out the harness lines downwind for increased
control and possibly ease them slightly upwind.  This will happen
sooner in choppy water.

Easing the lines gets your body farther from the rig and lets you hunch
over for more control.  You can also move the rig and your body farther
and more quickly with longer lines.  You're stance is not as locked-in.

sm

 
 
 

spoilers?

Post by Kevin » Thu, 28 Sep 2006 19:07:10

Check out the ZUD

http://www.cookislands.com/index_A_Rarotonga.html?Mainframe_Kingsbury...

Ken uses the nose of the board like a  wing.

Cheers

 
 
 

spoilers?

Post by Tom - Chicag » Fri, 29 Sep 2006 01:05:03

Dave:

I run really short lines.  It took me some time to get used to it - feels
like you are going to get catapulted all the time - but I think it works
waay better for powered FW sailing.  Upright is fast.

I really concentrate on light hands and driving the power from hips thru
legs - especially keeping lots of force driving thru the front leg.

Tom - Chicago


Quote:


>> Dave:

>> I only do this way OP'd with F board and big sail on flat water.  I do
>> not
>> have enough control or skill to do it when there is much chop.

>> I'm a bit confused - if  I'm moving forward at 20+ kts - not sliding
>> across
>> the surface of the water - what is the leeward rail going to catch on?

>> I have been slammed many times - but I guess I have a feel for this and
>> riding thru the gust (while a act of faith at first) causes far fewer
>> high
>> speed crashes than sheeting out.

>> Tom - Chicago.

> Tom,

> I get concearned when I am way powered and the board is up out of the
> water,  I can look and see air between the board and the water all the
> way back to my front foot.
> If I'm bearing off just a bit my leeward edge is going to be catching
> the backside of any chop before the rest of the board. So if the nose
> starts to bounce due to chop or me letting up at all even for a second
> due to a gust if the nose drops down at the same time chop comes up, I
> get nerveous.    I'm not talking large chop either,  maybe just a few
> inches tall at most and if I can get a really flat section of water I
> don't worry.

> Do you run longer or shorter harness lines?  Reading the thread on
> harness lines I'm curious if my somewhat shorter lines and  more
> upright stance are what is making me
> more nerveous.

> Dave