starboard formula 155 — how good?

starboard formula 155 — how good?

Post by Foliu » Fri, 18 Aug 2000 04:00:00


Does anyone think that the SB formula 155 is considerably better than
other light wind course boards like the thomen xxl, ahd 72 78, given
riders of the same weight, sail area, and ability.  Or is it better than
in some conditions, eg flat water etc, ....
 
 
 

starboard formula 155 — how good?

Post by sailqui » Fri, 18 Aug 2000 04:00:00

Hi Folium,

Quote:
> Does anyone think that the SB formula 155 is considerably better than
> other light wind course boards like the thomen xxl, ahd 72 78, given
> riders of the same weight, sail area, and ability.

Yes, I do think the Formula 155 is substantially better, and over a
wider range of sailor weight and wind/water conditions.
I weigh 160 lbs (73 Kg) and I was able  to sail the Formula 155 quite
easily in the Columbia River Gorge in 15-22 knots on a 7.9 Sailworks
XT2 a few weeks ago, and was out racing with Darren from Sailworks
up and down and on both sides of the river in a wide range of
conditions.
We were "pushing" each other, and were thus able to go upwind way higher
than the other boards, reach across the river as fast or faster than the
other boards on the water, and came back upriver at incredible speeds
going way off the wind.
The next weekend I was on perfectly flat water in Mission Bay and
Alamitos Bay in Long Beach and the Formula was the first to plane
(with a 10.7 m2 XT2, and clearly  able to go faster and higher upwind
than any other board on the water. There are a number of other Formula
155's now sailing in Mission Bay with really big guys (like 230 lbs+
105 Kg) and with big sails, like the 10.7 XT2 or Gaastra Nitro 10.9m2
even these big guys were very fast in around 10 knots of wind.
The width and volume placement in the Formula combined with the
refined rocker line and rail bevels makes the Formula an incredible
board from 6 knots to over 20 knots, and in flat water to fairly big
rolling chop like the Gorge on the WA side from the Event Site.

Quote:
>  Or is it better than in some conditions, eg flat water etc, ....

No, it's good in a very wide range of conditions once you learn
to tune and sail it.
I'm still amazed I was able to sail it in the Gorge, and also amazed
when I can plane on the same board in steady 6-7 knot winds.
AND, the Formula 155 has won the Formula 31 Racing national
championships in countries all over the world at the highest levels of
racing, and against the other boards you mention, on an incredibly
consistent basis in all sorts of conditions and with many different
weight sailors.
Yes, it's that good, and this statement is reaffirmed virtually  every
time I meet a  sailor with a new Formula 155. They all seem to love
the Formula.
later,
        Roger

--
sailquik (Roger Jackson) US 7011
Sailworks/Starboard/System B/True Ames/Chinook

 
 
 

starboard formula 155 — how good?

Post by <rettv.. » Fri, 18 Aug 2000 04:00:00

Yes its really somthing by it self check the results on the racing sceen.
Combined results in the world championship for productionboards

1. Wojtec Borozowski, Starboard/Pryde

2. Jamie Lever, Starboard/Gun

3. Arnon Dragan, Drops/Gun

 ...............

6. Alexander Boxill, Norge - Starboard/Gaastra

8. Sondre Sturla Krey, Norge

10.Jarle Stenerud, Norge - Starboard/Gaastra

course result in the same

1. Wojtec Borozowski, Polen - Starboard Formula 155

2. Jamie Lever, England - Starboard Formula 155

3. Bj?rn Rune Jensen, Danmark - Starboard Formula 155

..................

16. Alexander Boxill, Norge - Starboard Formula 155

22. Jarle Stenerud, Norge - Starboard Formula 155

All the best


Quote:
> Hi Folium,

> > Does anyone think that the SB formula 155 is considerably better than
> > other light wind course boards like the thomen xxl, ahd 72 78, given
> > riders of the same weight, sail area, and ability.
> Yes, I do think the Formula 155 is substantially better, and over a
> wider range of sailor weight and wind/water conditions.
> I weigh 160 lbs (73 Kg) and I was able  to sail the Formula 155 quite
> easily in the Columbia River Gorge in 15-22 knots on a 7.9 Sailworks
> XT2 a few weeks ago, and was out racing with Darren from Sailworks
> up and down and on both sides of the river in a wide range of
> conditions.
> We were "pushing" each other, and were thus able to go upwind way higher
> than the other boards, reach across the river as fast or faster than the
> other boards on the water, and came back upriver at incredible speeds
> going way off the wind.
> The next weekend I was on perfectly flat water in Mission Bay and
> Alamitos Bay in Long Beach and the Formula was the first to plane
> (with a 10.7 m2 XT2, and clearly  able to go faster and higher upwind
> than any other board on the water. There are a number of other Formula
> 155's now sailing in Mission Bay with really big guys (like 230 lbs+
> 105 Kg) and with big sails, like the 10.7 XT2 or Gaastra Nitro 10.9m2
> even these big guys were very fast in around 10 knots of wind.
> The width and volume placement in the Formula combined with the
> refined rocker line and rail bevels makes the Formula an incredible
> board from 6 knots to over 20 knots, and in flat water to fairly big
> rolling chop like the Gorge on the WA side from the Event Site.

> >  Or is it better than in some conditions, eg flat water etc, ....
> No, it's good in a very wide range of conditions once you learn
> to tune and sail it.
> I'm still amazed I was able to sail it in the Gorge, and also amazed
> when I can plane on the same board in steady 6-7 knot winds.
> AND, the Formula 155 has won the Formula 31 Racing national
> championships in countries all over the world at the highest levels of
> racing, and against the other boards you mention, on an incredibly
> consistent basis in all sorts of conditions and with many different
> weight sailors.
> Yes, it's that good, and this statement is reaffirmed virtually  every
> time I meet a  sailor with a new Formula 155. They all seem to love
> the Formula.
> later,
> Roger

> --
> sailquik (Roger Jackson) US 7011
> Sailworks/Starboard/System B/True Ames/Chinook


 
 
 

starboard formula 155 — how good?

Post by Mar » Sat, 19 Aug 2000 12:51:18

I had the pleasure of trying a formula 155, and must agree it planes
up incredibly easily and points absolutely AMAZEINGLY high into the
wind.   But I'm sorry... in 15-22 knots of wind, I want a smaller
turnier board.  I will NOT go up/down wind as far or fast as the 155
could, but for me the fun is in carving on waves, rolling the board
rail to rail, and the loose feeling you get with a narrower, curvier
outline board...  I can see owning a 155 for the light days, when you
just gotta sail a big wide board... But no one will ever convince me
it's more fun to ride it when it's blowing good enough to sail a
100liter freeride board (15-22).  Or even my bigger Explosion II.
 
 
 

starboard formula 155 — how good?

Post by sailqui » Sat, 19 Aug 2000 04:00:00

Hi Mark,

Quote:
> I had the pleasure of trying a formula 155, and must agree it planes
> up incredibly easily and points absolutely AMAZEINGLY high into the
> wind.

Yep, it does both of these things better than any other board currently
on the water. There are boards that might plane earlier, and there are
boards that may go upwind better, but there are no boards that do both,
and can be sailed up into the mid 20 knot range but a light weight
sailor. The secret is the "bevels".

Quote:
> But I'm sorry... in 15-22 knots of wind, I want a smaller
> turnier board.

Hmmmm.... how "turny" do you want it. Once you learn how to
make it turn, the Formula 155 is VERY turny, for a board that can
also win races in these same windspeeds.

Quote:
>  I will NOT go up/down wind as far or fast as the 155
> could,

You've got that right!
Quote:
>.... but for me the fun is in carving on waves, rolling the board
> rail to rail, and the loose feeling you get with a narrower, curvier
> outline board...

Well, there will be a 135 liter that may be slightly narrower coming out
next year I've heard.

Quote:
>  I can see owning  a 155 for the light days, when you
> just gotta sail a big wide board...

Yes, I gotta agree with you on this idea.

Quote:
> But no one will ever convince me
> it's more fun to ride it when it's blowing good enough to sail a
> 100liter freeride board (15-22).  Or even my bigger Explosion II.

Well, Darren and I left nearly all the folks on their 100 liter free
rides, and all of the people on their older, narrower boards like
the Explosion, so far behind we thought they were anchored when we were
sailing back and forth in front of the Event Site, and when we took off
for the nun buoy off the Hatchery, we made it in 4 tacks across the
river, and coming back, there were no boards on the water going anywhere
near as fast.
If I wanted to turn off a face, I just did it. In fact over on the
WA side of the river, I was doing some fairly radical turning off
faces to keep from getting launched. Darren being heavier, he didn't
seem to have this problem.
This board has just an unbelievable range, which was the point of
my original post.
Regards,
        Roger

--
sailquik (Roger Jackson) US 7011
Sailworks/Starboard/System B/True Ames/Chinook

 
 
 

starboard formula 155 — how good?

Post by Steven Sla » Sat, 19 Aug 2000 04:00:00

Quote:
> just gotta sail a big wide board... But no one will ever convince me
> it's more fun to ride it when it's blowing good enough to sail a
> 100liter freeride board (15-22).  Or even my bigger Explosion II.

I don't think anyone is trying to convince you to sail a Formula when you
would be fully powered on a 100L board.

If you want to have a quiver of boards to be perfect for any type of
condition that's ok, but for someone who may want only one board that can
handle 99.9% of the conditions for light wind areas (i.e. Not the Gorge!)
then the Starboard can handle it, maximizing your time and enjoyment on the
water especially on the light wind days.

Case in point; earlier this week I was out on the 9.5 Retro and an early
planing board. Other guys were out on their 100L boards and 6.5 sails.
They schlogged and managed to get planing during the gusts. I, on the
other hand, was ripping all over the place practising my jibes until I
couldn't stand it any more.

Guess who had the most fun, and learned the most ? ;-)

Steve.
--
 "The surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is
that it has never tried to contact us" (Bill Watterson)                    

 
 
 

starboard formula 155 — how good?

Post by Ellen Falle » Sat, 19 Aug 2000 04:00:00

Okay, I'll guess that:
 Steve had the most fun.
 And the other guys learned that Steve rules on the water on his light
wind set up, big grin, and great jibes.
   Am I close?
Quote:

> Guess who had the most fun, and learned the most ? ;-)

> Steve.

 
 
 

starboard formula 155 — how good?

Post by jnoble.. » Sat, 19 Aug 2000 04:00:00

Quote:
> Case in point; earlier this week I was out on the 9.5 Retro and an
early
> planing board. Other guys were out on their 100L boards and 6.5 sails.
> They schlogged and managed to get planing during the gusts. I, on the
> other hand, was ripping all over the place practising my jibes until I
> couldn't stand it any more.

> Guess who had the most fun, and learned the most ? ;-)

> Steve.

Oh, I know! The guys sitting on the beach, wisely discussing how
useless the "new" gear is! :)) Or was it the guys who watched your
massive crashes when you got launched (or year, I forgot the new gear
has more range so that doesn't really happen that often). :)))

Everytime I get to sail with my big stuff while lighter weight people
are still sitting on the beach it really hammers home how great a
decision investing in low wind equipment like my 10.0M Synthesis and
Starboard Go really was. Sure it was expensive up front but when you
looked at all the saved sailing sessions, it's definately worth
spending the money!

I readily admit to a real preference to sailing over sitting on the
beach (although my girlfriend is quite an appealing sight in a swim
suit so I will admit that occassionally I enjoy the beach). :)

The forecasters are starting to predict some good NW winds for SW
Ontario tomorrow! Yippee!!!

~Jamie N

Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Before you buy.

 
 
 

starboard formula 155 — how good?

Post by Steven Sla » Sat, 19 Aug 2000 04:00:00

Quote:

> Okay, I'll guess that:
>  Steve had the most fun.
>  And the other guys learned that Steve rules on the water on his light
> wind set up, big grin, and great jibes.
>    Am I close?

Good guess ;-)

Lets just say that I could have probably sold that rig to the highest
bidder at the end of the session!

Big boards are not just for beginners any more...

Steve.

--
 "The surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is
that it has never tried to contact us" (Bill Watterson)                    

 
 
 

starboard formula 155 — how good?

Post by Dpou2 » Sun, 20 Aug 2000 10:53:12

I have been following your coments on the formula 155 for a while . I do agree
with you of its light wind performance, its ability to point and go downwind.
You can not convince me though that is more fun than a bump and jump board at
18-20 reaching jibing , jumping . I don't see why someone preffers a 9.0 and a
door under their feet to a 8.6 board with a 6.0 at half the weight. I am sure
that the 155 is a superb race board with giant sails but I wonder if it can fly
at37.8 mph on Hatteras chop just like my 19.5 wide Roberts. If that is possible
with the starboard then I am buying one tomorow. If not I might still get one
and use it at 10-15 .Dimitri
 
 
 

starboard formula 155 — how good?

Post by sailqui » Sun, 20 Aug 2000 13:36:16

Quote:

> I have been following your coments on the formula 155 for a while . I do agree
> with you of its light wind performance, its ability to point and go downwind.

I'm glad that you agree. I guess I get a little over enthusiastic about
the
Formula 155, but until you've actually sailed one (for more than a few
minutes
in lite air with a big sail) it's hard to appreciate the incredible
range,
and the overall speed possible with this board.

Quote:
> You can not convince me though that is more fun than a bump and jump board at
> 18-20 reaching jibing , jumping.

I'm not saying it's more fun in those conditions, I have a Carve 111 and
99
with 6.5 and 5.5 Retro's, and a waist harness for those kind of B&J
conditions.
I am saying that the Formula 155 is sailable and raceable in those
conditions
as well as being a terrific lite air planing/racing board.
Unlike most other race boards that get hard to control in 18-20 (at
least the
hard railed, lite air flavor designed to be raced in 10-12) the Formula
remains
easy to ride and quite fast up into that range.

Quote:
> I don't see why someone preffers a 9.0 and a door under their feet to a 8.6
> board with a 6.0 at half the weight.

I think you must be talking about the GO, not the Formula. It's anything
but
a "door", and goes really well with sails down to 6.0 m2. (Probably even
smaller if you take the time to learn to tune it.)

Quote:
> I am sure that the 155 is a superb race board with giant sails but I wonder
> if it can fly  at 37.8 mph on Hatteras chop just like my 19.5 wide Roberts.

In what wind speed did you record this speed? I will be at the HIWC this
fall,
and if Bob brings the speed check setup again, we will see what the
Formula 155
can do.
If you recorded that speed in less than 19 knots, then the Formula may
give your
Roberts some competition.

Quote:
> If that is possible with the starboard then I am buying one tomorow. If not I might still get one
> and use it at 10-15.

Make that 7-20 if you are under 175 lbs, and 9-22+ if you are heavier.
C'Ya in November!
        Roger

--
sailquik (Roger Jackson) US 7011
Sailworks/Starboard/System B/True Ames/Chinook

 
 
 

starboard formula 155 — how good?

Post by Steven Sla » Tue, 22 Aug 2000 11:44:34

Quote:

>I don't see why someone preffers a 9.0 and a
> door under their feet to a 8.6 board with a 6.0 at half the weight.

Winds in the 6-10 knot range where your 8.6 board would be under about 6
inches of water, standing still!

Steve.

--
 "The surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is
that it has never tried to contact us" (Bill Watterson)