Windsurfing Death in Long Island sound

Windsurfing Death in Long Island sound

Post by Gene M » Tue, 24 Jan 2006 08:36:44


Just saw this link mentioned in the news, although it was reported on
TV as a kite surfing death. I didn't know him, but my heart goes out to
friends and family of the sailor. Yesterday was a hard day to miss up
in North east, with winds up in 20-30 knots and temps in 60's, which is
a rarity for January.
Does anyone know who this was?

-Gene

 
 
 

Windsurfing Death in Long Island sound

Post by Gene M » Tue, 24 Jan 2006 08:39:25

.. and the said link is: http://wtnh.com/Global/story.asp?S=4394465

-Gene

 
 
 

Windsurfing Death in Long Island sound

Post by Florian Feuser /FF » Tue, 24 Jan 2006 11:55:27


Quote:
> ... and the said link is: http://SportToday.org/

> -Gene

This truly awful news.

I sailed the sound with a group of local guys around the same time near
Bayville; a few miles across the sound from where this happened. The
forecast had called for a strong NW late in the day and was spot on. The
front hit around 4:30PM and the wind just switched around from SW in a
matter of seconds. The development was pretty obvious from the LI north
shore but we were still surprised by the suddenness and *** of the
front.

I am ordering a strobe right now <http://SportToday.org/
html> and I would like to urge everyone else who sails or kites under
these conditions to take a serious look at their safety measures. Let's
not shrug this one off, but do it out of respect for the man who died.

My condolences.

/FF/

 
 
 

Windsurfing Death in Long Island sound

Post by wsurf » Tue, 24 Jan 2006 12:25:47

Quote:
> This truly awful news.

Was he windsurfing or kitesurfing?
 
 
 

Windsurfing Death in Long Island sound

Post by aprevel.. » Tue, 24 Jan 2006 12:47:51

Unfortunately, I was there to see this unfold.  I am a windsurfer and
was waiting for the wind to pick up.  When it did, it was too late to
go out and I watched a friend struggle to get back to shore.  The kiter
was close to shore (maybe 150 feet) but for whatever reason, he stayed
with his kite and slowly drifted offshore.  I watched him with
binoculars for 40 minutes waiting for the marine police to arrive.  As
it happens, the town marine unit had boat problems and never did show
up.  The fire department, police and paramedics were watching from the
beach, but were unable to assist.  By the time another town's marine
unit got there, he had lost his hold and was gone.  There was more than
enough time rescue this man, everyone was relying on the marine rescue
unit and they broke down.

What I learned was that a life jacket may have kept him afloat for
those last crictical minutes (don't know for sure that he didn't have
one but a friend said he usually wears one but not this time) but more
importantly, he had his opportunity to get to shore early on, but chose
not to go to shore.  I can only speculate that he was thinking he could
recover and sail back to the beach with his kite.  It may be hard to
do, but at times, leaving your rig may be the right choice.

I think that it may have turned out completely different if it were a
windsurfer, beign able to stay on the board or alternatively paddle the
board back to the beach.  The kiters have no means whatsoever to get
out of the cold water other than swimming to shore, which for this poor
fellow, quickly became impossible.

I offer sincere my deepest sympathy to his family and friends.

Quote:


> > ... and the said link is: http://SportToday.org/

> > -Gene

> This truly awful news.

> I sailed the sound with a group of local guys around the same time near
> Bayville; a few miles across the sound from where this happened. The
> forecast had called for a strong NW late in the day and was spot on. The
> front hit around 4:30PM and the wind just switched around from SW in a
> matter of seconds. The development was pretty obvious from the LI north
> shore but we were still surprised by the suddenness and *** of the
> front.

> I am ordering a strobe right now <http://SportToday.org/
> html> and I would like to urge everyone else who sails or kites under
> these conditions to take a serious look at their safety measures. Let's
> not shrug this one off, but do it out of respect for the man who died.

> My condolences.

> /FF/

 
 
 

Windsurfing Death in Long Island sound

Post by Paul Braunbehren » Tue, 24 Jan 2006 13:14:05

What was the water temperature?  I'm having a hard time understanding
why this man died. According to the news he was wearing a drysuit,
gloves and booties.  He should have had plenty of flotation, and cold
should not have affected him too much in a drysuit.

The news also said that it took them 17 hours to find the body, that is
a looong time indeed.

While it's true that windsurfers have the advantage in terms of board
flotation, that's not something that one can count on.  I have talked
to several people who lost their board.  One guy was pretty far from
shore, and somehow the connection between his rig and his board broke.
He was left holding the rig, and the board was being driven by the wind
and out of reach within seconds.


Quote:

> Unfortunately, I was there to see this unfold.  I am a windsurfer and
> was waiting for the wind to pick up.  When it did, it was too late to
> go out and I watched a friend struggle to get back to shore.  The kiter
> was close to shore (maybe 150 feet) but for whatever reason, he stayed
> with his kite and slowly drifted offshore.  I watched him with
> binoculars for 40 minutes waiting for the marine police to arrive.  As
> it happens, the town marine unit had boat problems and never did show
> up.  The fire department, police and paramedics were watching from the
> beach, but were unable to assist.  By the time another town's marine
> unit got there, he had lost his hold and was gone.  There was more than
> enough time rescue this man, everyone was relying on the marine rescue
> unit and they broke down.

> What I learned was that a life jacket may have kept him afloat for
> those last crictical minutes (don't know for sure that he didn't have
> one but a friend said he usually wears one but not this time) but more
> importantly, he had his opportunity to get to shore early on, but chose
> not to go to shore.  I can only speculate that he was thinking he could
> recover and sail back to the beach with his kite.  It may be hard to
> do, but at times, leaving your rig may be the right choice.

> I think that it may have turned out completely different if it were a
> windsurfer, beign able to stay on the board or alternatively paddle the
> board back to the beach.  The kiters have no means whatsoever to get
> out of the cold water other than swimming to shore, which for this poor
> fellow, quickly became impossible.

> I offer sincere my deepest sympathy to his family and friends.



> > > ... and the said link is: http://SportToday.org/

> > > -Gene

> > This truly awful news.

> > I sailed the sound with a group of local guys around the same time near
> > Bayville; a few miles across the sound from where this happened. The
> > forecast had called for a strong NW late in the day and was spot on. The
> > front hit around 4:30PM and the wind just switched around from SW in a
> > matter of seconds. The development was pretty obvious from the LI north
> > shore but we were still surprised by the suddenness and *** of the
> > front.

> > I am ordering a strobe right now <http://SportToday.org/
> > html> and I would like to urge everyone else who sails or kites under
> > these conditions to take a serious look at their safety measures. Let's
> > not shrug this one off, but do it out of respect for the man who died.

> > My condolences.

> > /FF/

 
 
 

Windsurfing Death in Long Island sound

Post by Roger Jacks » Tue, 24 Jan 2006 13:29:22

Thank you "aprevelige";
I've been looking at all the available news reports on this, until you
added your "real time", "on the spot information" I was having a very
hard time determining where this was kiting accident or windsurfing
accident.
My condolences to this fellow waterman's family as well.
But I think this also points out another problem.
Windsurfing is facing a severe "identity crisis".
The news report from the original poster here was headlined "Kitesurferr
lost in L.I. Sound."
The video on the same site (TV news channel) was very unclear on what
sport the lost man was participating in.
The Connecticut Post(online at connpost.com) had a similar article with
lots of details about the small RHI boat that didn't work and had to be
rescued by the CG, but that article was headlined "Windsurfer lost in LI
Sound.
So, unless the Conn Post retracts their story, half of Connecticut will
think we've lost a windsurfer.
For those of you thinking (as Florian has) about getting yourself a
rescue strobe, I'd suggest the slightly more expensive ACR Fire Fly.
The link Florian posted also has a well priced GPS/VHF radio combo.
Imagine if this fellow had been in a PFD, and had a strobe and the
VHF/GPS combo.
Provided the batteries were maintained (all my GPS and comms units run
on rechargeables and you can now get solar chargers to keep the
batteries fully charged all the time) the lost kite boarder could have
used the strobe (after dark) so the CG could locate him, and with the
VHF/GPS combo he could have called in his lat/long position (within
about 10 meters or better (30 foot circle) and he could have
communicated with the CG helicopter, the 41 footers (there were 2
according to the CG Group in New Haven) and the larger CG vessel that
recovered his body.
I tell you I'm not sailing anywhere alone or in offshore winds that I
cannot walk back from without some sort of back up devices.
Too bad they aren't yet making a EPIRB/Strobe/GPS/VHF/Cell unit. That
would get you help in  a heartbeat almost anywhere.
Aircraft (CG rescue and private/commercial planes) all pick up the EPIRB
signal and can direction find it.
On Scene rescue craft can see the strobe at nite (I've done alot of SAR
and good luck to anyone without a Strobe.
GPS can be used so the victim can will know the location to "call in"
his/her position.
VHF (unfortunately handhelds are limited to 1 watt so not too much
range) so the victim can talk to the CG. Plus most CG vessels have a VHF
direction finder that will nail down even a 1 watt signal pretty well.
Cell phone (to 911) so the victim (if close enough to shore and cell
coverage) (which I'm sure would have worked in this incident) can call
in via cell phone with his position and his problem. This would get the
closest Marine Patrol/Fire/Rescue Squads on scene even faster than
through the Coast Guard Rescue Coordination Center/CG Station which may
be located many miles away.
I think many of the new cell phones can also be located by law
enforcement direction finders.
Again, my condolences to his loved ones and family. I guess this is
truly an tragedy, because if he had the proper rescue gear or had simply
dumped the kite, rolled it up and swam in from 150 yards, he'd be
alive today.
Roger
Quote:

> Unfortunately, I was there to see this unfold.  I am a windsurfer and
> was waiting for the wind to pick up.  When it did, it was too late to
> go out and I watched a friend struggle to get back to shore.  The kiter
> was close to shore (maybe 150 feet) but for whatever reason, he stayed
> with his kite and slowly drifted offshore.  I watched him with
> binoculars for 40 minutes waiting for the marine police to arrive.  As
> it happens, the town marine unit had boat problems and never did show
> up.  The fire department, police and paramedics were watching from the
> beach, but were unable to assist.  By the time another town's marine
> unit got there, he had lost his hold and was gone.  There was more than
> enough time rescue this man, everyone was relying on the marine rescue
> unit and they broke down.

> What I learned was that a life jacket may have kept him afloat for
> those last crictical minutes (don't know for sure that he didn't have
> one but a friend said he usually wears one but not this time) but more
> importantly, he had his opportunity to get to shore early on, but chose
> not to go to shore.  I can only speculate that he was thinking he could
> recover and sail back to the beach with his kite.  It may be hard to
> do, but at times, leaving your rig may be the right choice.

> I think that it may have turned out completely different if it were a
> windsurfer, beign able to stay on the board or alternatively paddle the
> board back to the beach.  The kiters have no means whatsoever to get
> out of the cold water other than swimming to shore, which for this poor
> fellow, quickly became impossible.

> I offer sincere my deepest sympathy to his family and friends.



>>>... and the said link is: http://SportToday.org/

>>>-Gene

>>This truly awful news.

>>I sailed the sound with a group of local guys around the same time near
>>Bayville; a few miles across the sound from where this happened. The
>>forecast had called for a strong NW late in the day and was spot on. The
>>front hit around 4:30PM and the wind just switched around from SW in a
>>matter of seconds. The development was pretty obvious from the LI north
>>shore but we were still surprised by the suddenness and *** of the
>>front.

>>I am ordering a strobe right now <http://SportToday.org/
>>html> and I would like to urge everyone else who sails or kites under
>>these conditions to take a serious look at their safety measures. Let's
>>not shrug this one off, but do it out of respect for the man who died.

>>My condolences.

>>/FF/

 
 
 

Windsurfing Death in Long Island sound

Post by Elle » Tue, 24 Jan 2006 14:19:41

Airtemps were in the mid 30s, and water temp was 39. There were some
problems getting the rescue boats going, and a sort of Murphy's Law
effect took over. But we don't know if the seals on his suit were good,
how much he had on underneath, etc. It happened right after sunset and
getting dark fast. The wind jumped from mid ***s to high 20's with
gusts to mid 40's, and it shifted direction from SW (more onshore) to
NW (offshore).
  Ellen
 
 
 

Windsurfing Death in Long Island sound

Post by Paul Braunbehren » Tue, 24 Jan 2006 16:27:34

Thanks for the info Ellen.  That's pretty damn cold.  If you guys sail
in those temps I hope you have all your ducks in a row... not much room
for error.


Quote:

> Airtemps were in the mid 30s, and water temp was 39. There were some
> problems getting the rescue boats going, and a sort of Murphy's Law
> effect took over. But we don't know if the seals on his suit were good,
> how much he had on underneath, etc. It happened right after sunset and
> getting dark fast. The wind jumped from mid ***s to high 20's with
> gusts to mid 40's, and it shifted direction from SW (more onshore) to
> NW (offshore).
>   Ellen

 
 
 

Windsurfing Death in Long Island sound

Post by Paul Braunbehren » Tue, 24 Jan 2006 16:43:15

Does the EPIRB give a small enough search area?  I thought there was
some delay and a prety large search area.  I usually sail with a VHF
and a strobe, unless I'm pretty confident I can swim back.

As for VHF batteries, I would prefer alkaline if possible.  The
rechargeables are always a ***shoot.  Usually they will work just
fine, but if you don't use them for a long time, even if "fully
charged" they may fail on you.  These emergency VHF's typically get no
use.  Mine has a built in FM radio, so I occasionally use it to listen
to radio for a couple hours just to make sure it will work when push
comes to shove.

There are a couple of other issues with VHF.

One person has told me that he tested his "waterproof" vhf and couldn't
get anyone to understand what he was saying.  He says he thinks that
wind noise over the microphone is an issue, as well as water sitting on
the mic.  We may need to use these devices in rough weather while
treading water.  Another person has told me that he had no problem
doing this test.

If you put the VHF in a bag, it will quickly die unless you remove it
from the bag after every session.  The reason is that a small amount of
water gets in the bag, and vaporizes due to the greenhouse effect.
Water vapor infiltrates the VHF and starts corroding it.  I now use
mine without a bag, and it's lasted a whole season (but looks really
bad).  Has anyone tried a bag with silica bags in it?

I carry mine in a pouch on the back of the harness.  I also have a
strobe, 20ft of line, and a whistle which is just clipped to the
harness with a SS carabiner.

One step to avoiding further fatalities is to discuss and test safety
equipment.


Quote:

> Thank you "aprevelige";
> I've been looking at all the available news reports on this, until you
> added your "real time", "on the spot information" I was having a very
> hard time determining where this was kiting accident or windsurfing
> accident.
> My condolences to this fellow waterman's family as well.
> But I think this also points out another problem.
> Windsurfing is facing a severe "identity crisis".
> The news report from the original poster here was headlined "Kitesurferr
> lost in L.I. Sound."
> The video on the same site (TV news channel) was very unclear on what
> sport the lost man was participating in.
> The Connecticut Post(online at connpost.com) had a similar article with
> lots of details about the small RHI boat that didn't work and had to be
> rescued by the CG, but that article was headlined "Windsurfer lost in LI
> Sound.
> So, unless the Conn Post retracts their story, half of Connecticut will
> think we've lost a windsurfer.
> For those of you thinking (as Florian has) about getting yourself a
> rescue strobe, I'd suggest the slightly more expensive ACR Fire Fly.
> The link Florian posted also has a well priced GPS/VHF radio combo.
> Imagine if this fellow had been in a PFD, and had a strobe and the
> VHF/GPS combo.
> Provided the batteries were maintained (all my GPS and comms units run
> on rechargeables and you can now get solar chargers to keep the
> batteries fully charged all the time) the lost kite boarder could have
> used the strobe (after dark) so the CG could locate him, and with the
> VHF/GPS combo he could have called in his lat/long position (within
> about 10 meters or better (30 foot circle) and he could have
> communicated with the CG helicopter, the 41 footers (there were 2
> according to the CG Group in New Haven) and the larger CG vessel that
> recovered his body.
> I tell you I'm not sailing anywhere alone or in offshore winds that I
> cannot walk back from without some sort of back up devices.
> Too bad they aren't yet making a EPIRB/Strobe/GPS/VHF/Cell unit. That
> would get you help in  a heartbeat almost anywhere.
> Aircraft (CG rescue and private/commercial planes) all pick up the EPIRB
> signal and can direction find it.
> On Scene rescue craft can see the strobe at nite (I've done alot of SAR
> and good luck to anyone without a Strobe.
> GPS can be used so the victim can will know the location to "call in"
> his/her position.
> VHF (unfortunately handhelds are limited to 1 watt so not too much
> range) so the victim can talk to the CG. Plus most CG vessels have a VHF
> direction finder that will nail down even a 1 watt signal pretty well.
> Cell phone (to 911) so the victim (if close enough to shore and cell
> coverage) (which I'm sure would have worked in this incident) can call
> in via cell phone with his position and his problem. This would get the
> closest Marine Patrol/Fire/Rescue Squads on scene even faster than
> through the Coast Guard Rescue Coordination Center/CG Station which may
> be located many miles away.
> I think many of the new cell phones can also be located by law
> enforcement direction finders.
> Again, my condolences to his loved ones and family. I guess this is
> truly an tragedy, because if he had the proper rescue gear or had simply
> dumped the kite, rolled it up and swam in from 150 yards, he'd be
> alive today.
> Roger


> > Unfortunately, I was there to see this unfold.  I am a windsurfer and
> > was waiting for the wind to pick up.  When it did, it was too late to
> > go out and I watched a friend struggle to get back to shore.  The kiter
> > was close to shore (maybe 150 feet) but for whatever reason, he stayed
> > with his kite and slowly drifted offshore.  I watched him with
> > binoculars for 40 minutes waiting for the marine police to arrive.  As
> > it happens, the town marine unit had boat problems and never did show
> > up.  The fire department, police and paramedics were watching from the
> > beach, but were unable to assist.  By the time another town's marine
> > unit got there, he had lost his hold and was gone.  There was more than
> > enough time rescue this man, everyone was relying on the marine rescue
> > unit and they broke down.

> > What I learned was that a life jacket may have kept him afloat for
> > those last crictical minutes (don't know for sure that he didn't have
> > one but a friend said he usually wears one but not this time) but more
> > importantly, he had his opportunity to get to shore early on, but chose
> > not to go to shore.  I can only speculate that he was thinking he could
> > recover and sail back to the beach with his kite.  It may be hard to
> > do, but at times, leaving your rig may be the right choice.

> > I think that it may have turned out completely different if it were a
> > windsurfer, beign able to stay on the board or alternatively paddle the
> > board back to the beach.  The kiters have no means whatsoever to get
> > out of the cold water other than swimming to shore, which for this poor
> > fellow, quickly became impossible.

> > I offer sincere my deepest sympathy to his family and friends.



> >>>... and the said link is: http://SportToday.org/

> >>>-Gene

> >>This truly awful news.

> >>I sailed the sound with a group of local guys around the same time near
> >>Bayville; a few miles across the sound from where this happened. The
> >>forecast had called for a strong NW late in the day and was spot on. The
> >>front hit around 4:30PM and the wind just switched around from SW in a
> >>matter of seconds. The development was pretty obvious from the LI north
> >>shore but we were still surprised by the suddenness and *** of the
> >>front.

> >>I am ordering a strobe right now <http://SportToday.org/
> >>html> and I would like to urge everyone else who sails or kites under
> >>these conditions to take a serious look at their safety measures. Let's
> >>not shrug this one off, but do it out of respect for the man who died.

> >>My condolences.

> >>/FF/

 
 
 

Windsurfing Death in Long Island sound

Post by jeff feeha » Tue, 24 Jan 2006 21:41:56

This is very sad - I have done my share of winter windsurfing on LIS,
but now get my winter fix frostbiting lasers - much safer. It's also
more fun - i just decided that the hassle/risk/discomfort factor for
winter windsurfing outweighed the fun. It often seemed like a lot of
work for marginal quality sailing. but to each his own.

2 questions;

where exactly did this happen? where did the guy launch?

what kind of dry suit was he wearing - bag suit or neoprene?

My own feeling is that people on the water - windsurfing, kiting, even
laser sailing - in winter, don't realize just how precarious their
situation is.

when the water is in the 30's, even a dry suit gets cold after a while
in the water. Most sailors don't spend more than a few minutes in the
water at a time, and everything seems fine. I don't think they realize
how quickly things will get bad if they are forced to stay in the water
for an hour, or worse, a few hours.

I once spent nearly an hour swimming gear to the beach in early winter.
I think water temps were low 40's - I was _very_ happy to get to the beach,
as I was getting colder than i thought was safe. I was wearing a neoprene
dry suit with a hood and warm booties.

water in the 30's is much worse than water in the 40's. if you look at
survival time estimates, you will see they are not linear with water
temperature.

I frostbite with a bag-style dry suit. they may be a little better for long
immersion times, but only if you are wearing enough insulation under them.
the temptation with bag suits is to wear less insulation if the air temps
are high - so you don't overheat while sailing. this will kill you if you
have to spend a long time in cold water. Air temps were pretty high
in connecticut this weekend.

Anyway, I'm saddened to hear of this. I hope we can learn more about the
exact circumstances, to prevent others suffering the same fate.

jeff

Quote:

> Just saw this link mentioned in the news, although it was reported on
> TV as a kite surfing death. I didn't know him, but my heart goes out to
> friends and family of the sailor. Yesterday was a hard day to miss up
> in North east, with winds up in 20-30 knots and temps in 60's, which is
> a rarity for January.
> Does anyone know who this was?

> -Gene

 
 
 

Windsurfing Death in Long Island sound

Post by wsurf » Tue, 24 Jan 2006 22:01:32

Quote:

> Unfortunately, I was there to see this unfold.

Thanks for providing the difficult information. In most ways, it
matters little that he was a kiter, except again the public is confused
about the difference. The headline of the thread is windsurfer, and the
video clip shows the news anchor telling the story with a picture of a
windsurfer in the background.

Who knows it the flotation of the board or the increased visibility of
a floating rig may have made a difference in his survival?

It seems kiter deaths, although rare, are much more common than
windsurfing deaths. Usually we hear of concussive injuries with kiters.
This sounds like hypothermia, and/or exhaustion without any floatation
device.

It is tragic. I am sorry that it happened and my heart goes out to the
the family and friends of the kiter.

 
 
 

Windsurfing Death in Long Island sound

Post by jeff feeha » Tue, 24 Jan 2006 22:17:11

Andy,

Did you notice what kind of drysuit he was wearing? the news report
indicated it was dark, which means it was probably a neoprene suit,
but bag-style suits are also available in dark colors, it's just not
as common.

he was recovered of stratford - is that where he launched? i know
long beach is a good NW launch.

jeff

Quote:

> Unfortunately, I was there to see this unfold.  I am a windsurfer and
> was waiting for the wind to pick up.  When it did, it was too late to
> go out and I watched a friend struggle to get back to shore.  The kiter
> was close to shore (maybe 150 feet) but for whatever reason, he stayed
> with his kite and slowly drifted offshore.  I watched him with
> binoculars for 40 minutes waiting for the marine police to arrive.  As
> it happens, the town marine unit had boat problems and never did show
> up.  The fire department, police and paramedics were watching from the
> beach, but were unable to assist.  By the time another town's marine
> unit got there, he had lost his hold and was gone.  There was more than
> enough time rescue this man, everyone was relying on the marine rescue
> unit and they broke down.

> What I learned was that a life jacket may have kept him afloat for
> those last crictical minutes (don't know for sure that he didn't have
> one but a friend said he usually wears one but not this time) but more
> importantly, he had his opportunity to get to shore early on, but chose
> not to go to shore.  I can only speculate that he was thinking he could
> recover and sail back to the beach with his kite.  It may be hard to
> do, but at times, leaving your rig may be the right choice.

> I think that it may have turned out completely different if it were a
> windsurfer, beign able to stay on the board or alternatively paddle the
> board back to the beach.  The kiters have no means whatsoever to get
> out of the cold water other than swimming to shore, which for this poor
> fellow, quickly became impossible.

> I offer sincere my deepest sympathy to his family and friends.

 
 
 

Windsurfing Death in Long Island sound

Post by jeff feeha » Wed, 25 Jan 2006 00:20:25

Quote:

> For those of you thinking (as Florian has) about getting yourself a
> rescue strobe, I'd suggest the slightly more expensive ACR Fire Fly.
> The link Florian posted also has a well priced GPS/VHF radio combo.
> Imagine if this fellow had been in a PFD, and had a strobe and the
> VHF/GPS combo.

The ACR Firefly is the strobe I use for offshore sailing. I have
one tethered to my inflatable PFD.

However, I will probably replace my ACR Firefly with one of these
laser signaling devices:

http://www.greatlandlaser.com/

I got one for my brother for christmas a year ago - they appear to be
much better than strobes. read the website. it certainly seemed like
  a well constructed product.

I did have one of my firefly's fail on me. i went to test it before
a trip, and it didn't work - new batteries didn't help. they gave me
a new one, no questions asked (that was landfall navigation in stamford
ct), but now i don't really trust them.

anyway, the main thing is that the laser seems to be a much more visible
device.

jeff

 
 
 

Windsurfing Death in Long Island sound

Post by Elle » Wed, 25 Jan 2006 02:45:14

HI Jeff,
   The Lighthouse Park newsgroup has lots of info on the whole
unfortunate incident. Andy P was a witness on the beach, and the local
newspapers and TV links were provided by Chad Lyons. Chad also spent a
lot of effort trying to straighten out the media on the differences
between kite- and wind- surfing, as did Peter Bogucki of New England
Windsurfing Journal. (For those who don't know, Peter lives in the next
town over from Stratford where this all began, and is the
publisher/editor of the esteemed and magnificent NEWJ.)
   I can send you the links, or maybe Ben or Andy can do so. It appears
that Murphy's Law had the upper hand in all this, with the rapid change
in weather, the kiter making a poor choice of trying to save his kite,
the local rescue boat breaking down as well as one of the operators
needing to be rescued, it happening at sundown, and so on. Even one
thing that had gone positively in all that might have made the
difference.
  In addition to all the other excellent points about preventing
unfortunate events, one must always remember to keep Murphy in mind.
  Ellen