Jibing in 60 mph winds...

Jibing in 60 mph winds...

Post by charlesive » Mon, 26 Feb 2001 05:40:08


Well, a call to the weather bureau says the winds are only 42 mph.  But out
at the sailing club, several miles away and right on the leeshore where the
wind is funneled down the lake for a few miles, I sat watching the
anemometer steady at 51 to 53 mph and gusts into the 60's.  Maximum I saw
was 67 mph with several at 65 mph.  Lowest reading over about 30 minutes,
while trying to gain courage to see if I was going to sail, was 47 mph.  I
cannot carry a board to the water in those kinds of winds, much less rig up.
I'm not sure you could wear a baggy drysuit and stand up.  Its been going
like this for hours.  People are tying down their cruisers.  We have good
winds but this is crazy with no storm anywhere in sight.  West Texas is
strange.

So how do you jibe in such conditions?  Easy.  You get in your car and
carefully try to go home.  As the wind comes across the tail of the car
(SUV) you bear off on the new tack, but be prepared to brake if your speed
picks up to much.  Tacking requires more accelerator, but it's much the
same.  Wait until you have sufficient forward speed, then you turn the wheel
slowly until the car comes around to the new tack.  Just as in windsurfing,
there is a forbidden zone dead into the wind where your gas mileage is
really poor.  Since water starting your SUV is not recommended, I advise not
doing a broad reach across the dam, try to stay on the side roads.

CI

 
 
 

Jibing in 60 mph winds...

Post by WARDO » Mon, 26 Feb 2001 07:46:52

Charles,
You doing any "chicken" jibes to dodge those gusts?
I did a little research on this wind generator:
http://www.surfingsports.com/f_pres_US_eta.asp?
Stop the animation and forward it frame by frame...12hr increments.
You can check out the wind barbs and isobars quite clearly for the
entire U.S.
Holy shmoly!!!! This puppy is a Low pressure cell and it's all wound up!
Come Monday in the Northeast.....lord almighty!
The winds at Mt. Washington will be off the scale.

WARDOG
http://www.surfingsports.com

Quote:

> Well, a call to the weather bureau says the winds are only 42 mph.  But out
> at the sailing club, several miles away and right on the leeshore where the
> wind is funneled down the lake for a few miles, I sat watching the
> anemometer steady at 51 to 53 mph and gusts into the 60's.  Maximum I saw
> was 67 mph with several at 65 mph.  Lowest reading over about 30 minutes,
> while trying to gain courage to see if I was going to sail, was 47 mph.  I
> cannot carry a board to the water in those kinds of winds, much less rig up.
> I'm not sure you could wear a baggy drysuit and stand up.  Its been going
> like this for hours.  People are tying down their cruisers.  We have good
> winds but this is crazy with no storm anywhere in sight.  West Texas is
> strange.

> So how do you jibe in such conditions?  Easy.  You get in your car and
> carefully try to go home.  As the wind comes across the tail of the car
> (SUV) you bear off on the new tack, but be prepared to brake if your speed
> picks up to much.  Tacking requires more accelerator, but it's much the
> same.  Wait until you have sufficient forward speed, then you turn the wheel
> slowly until the car comes around to the new tack.  Just as in windsurfing,
> there is a forbidden zone dead into the wind where your gas mileage is
> really poor.  Since water starting your SUV is not recommended, I advise not
> doing a broad reach across the dam, try to stay on the side roads.

> CI


 
 
 

Jibing in 60 mph winds...

Post by charlesive » Mon, 26 Feb 2001 08:46:00

Great animation and data.  Between 6:00 am local and noon, the low got
completely wound up here and exceeded our predictions.  The west winds
across the Panhandle and plains were STRONG!  We have a funnel effect that
always helps us get a little pinching effect that focussed that puppy right
on us.  Tomorrow is back to a normal 5 to 25 "who knows" kind of day.

By the way, there would have been no dodging those gusts.  When it's too
hard to walk and you have to squat down to make progress, I'm past the
chicken stage.  I am in the fraidy cat stage.  If this thing holds together,
the Northeast is in for a real blow.  I do not see how it can intensify over
land like the animation says.  I think it formed early, around 1600 UT here.

CI


Quote:
> Charles,
> You doing any "chicken" jibes to dodge those gusts?
> I did a little research on this wind generator:
> http://www.surfingsports.com/f_pres_US_eta.asp?
> Stop the animation and forward it frame by frame...12hr increments.
> You can check out the wind barbs and isobars quite clearly for the
> entire U.S.
> Holy shmoly!!!! This puppy is a Low pressure cell and it's all wound up!
> Come Monday in the Northeast.....lord almighty!
> The winds at Mt. Washington will be off the scale.

> WARDOG
> http://www.surfingsports.com


> > Well, a call to the weather bureau says the winds are only 42 mph.  But
out
> > at the sailing club, several miles away and right on the leeshore where
the
> > wind is funneled down the lake for a few miles, I sat watching the
> > anemometer steady at 51 to 53 mph and gusts into the 60's.  Maximum I
saw
> > was 67 mph with several at 65 mph.  Lowest reading over about 30
minutes,
> > while trying to gain courage to see if I was going to sail, was 47 mph.
I
> > cannot carry a board to the water in those kinds of winds, much less rig
up.
> > I'm not sure you could wear a baggy drysuit and stand up.  Its been goin
g
> > like this for hours.  People are tying down their cruisers.  We have
good
> > winds but this is crazy with no storm anywhere in sight.  West Texas is
> > strange.

> > So how do you jibe in such conditions?  Easy.  You get in your car and
> > carefully try to go home.  As the wind comes across the tail of the car
> > (SUV) you bear off on the new tack, but be prepared to brake if your
speed
> > picks up to much.  Tacking requires more accelerator, but it's much the
> > same.  Wait until you have sufficient forward speed, then you turn the
wheel
> > slowly until the car comes around to the new tack.  Just as in
windsurfing,
> > there is a forbidden zone dead into the wind where your gas mileage is
> > really poor.  Since water starting your SUV is not recommended, I advise
not
> > doing a broad reach across the dam, try to stay on the side roads.

> > CI


 
 
 

Jibing in 60 mph winds...

Post by Weed F » Mon, 26 Feb 2001 09:38:27

Charles asks:

<<So how do you jibe in such conditions?>>

By not rigging your 9.5 and 9.0 :)

 
 
 

Jibing in 60 mph winds...

Post by WARDO » Mon, 26 Feb 2001 10:00:24

Charles,
Ya'll got HUGE tumbleweeds out there in Texas. They have to get blown
into cars/trucks and houses with wind like that. Is it ever problematic?
I am baffled by this Mt. Washington place (the highest peak in the NE)
http://www.mountwashington.org/
Here is the wind summary for Jan. '01:

Wind Speed
Average for the Month: 32.4 MPH
Departure from Normal: -13.9 MPH
Peak Gust: 123 MPH from the northwest (January 11)
Days with 73 MPH or More: 11
Days with 100 MPH or More: 2

Isn't that nuts? It surely would drive you nuts to be around that much
wind, not to mention the cold!
There are a bunch of good sized lakes in the foothills of New Hamshire
and Maine near Mt. Washington...must be some sailing to be had at times.

WARDOG
http://surfingsports.com

Quote:

> Great animation and data.  Between 6:00 am local and noon, the low got
> completely wound up here and exceeded our predictions.  The west winds
> across the Panhandle and plains were STRONG!  We have a funnel effect that
> always helps us get a little pinching effect that focussed that puppy right
> on us.  Tomorrow is back to a normal 5 to 25 "who knows" kind of day.

> By the way, there would have been no dodging those gusts.  When it's too
> hard to walk and you have to squat down to make progress, I'm past the
> chicken stage.  I am in the fraidy cat stage.  If this thing holds together,
> the Northeast is in for a real blow.  I do not see how it can intensify over
> land like the animation says.  I think it formed early, around 1600 UT here.

> CI



> > Charles,
> > You doing any "chicken" jibes to dodge those gusts?
> > I did a little research on this wind generator:
> > http://www.surfingsports.com/f_pres_US_eta.asp?
> > Stop the animation and forward it frame by frame...12hr increments.
> > You can check out the wind barbs and isobars quite clearly for the
> > entire U.S.
> > Holy shmoly!!!! This puppy is a Low pressure cell and it's all wound up!
> > Come Monday in the Northeast.....lord almighty!
> > The winds at Mt. Washington will be off the scale.

> > WARDOG
> > http://www.surfingsports.com


> > > Well, a call to the weather bureau says the winds are only 42 mph.  But
> out
> > > at the sailing club, several miles away and right on the leeshore where
> the
> > > wind is funneled down the lake for a few miles, I sat watching the
> > > anemometer steady at 51 to 53 mph and gusts into the 60's.  Maximum I
> saw
> > > was 67 mph with several at 65 mph.  Lowest reading over about 30
> minutes,
> > > while trying to gain courage to see if I was going to sail, was 47 mph.
> I
> > > cannot carry a board to the water in those kinds of winds, much less rig
> up.
> > > I'm not sure you could wear a baggy drysuit and stand up.  Its been goin
> g
> > > like this for hours.  People are tying down their cruisers.  We have
> good
> > > winds but this is crazy with no storm anywhere in sight.  West Texas is
> > > strange.

> > > So how do you jibe in such conditions?  Easy.  You get in your car and
> > > carefully try to go home.  As the wind comes across the tail of the car
> > > (SUV) you bear off on the new tack, but be prepared to brake if your
> speed
> > > picks up to much.  Tacking requires more accelerator, but it's much the
> > > same.  Wait until you have sufficient forward speed, then you turn the
> wheel
> > > slowly until the car comes around to the new tack.  Just as in
> windsurfing,
> > > there is a forbidden zone dead into the wind where your gas mileage is
> > > really poor.  Since water starting your SUV is not recommended, I advise
> not
> > > doing a broad reach across the dam, try to stay on the side roads.

> > > CI

 
 
 

Jibing in 60 mph winds...

Post by Aver » Mon, 26 Feb 2001 11:44:49

Forgot the link, sorry...

http://www.sonic.net/~averyd/pics/Surf-N-Skate/windsurf4.JPG

ave-

: I have some pictures of when I went to Costa Rica years
: ago.  The bottom picture was a 50-60mph day, I just sat and watched.
: The guys sailing were 200lbs++ and had 2.5's, they were getting
: worked too...

: The top pic is me jibing on a nice mello 5.5 day, very fun place
: to sail!

: ave-

: : Well, a call to the weather bureau says the winds are only 42 mph.  But out
: : at the sailing club, several miles away and right on the leeshore where the
: : wind is funneled down the lake for a few miles, I sat watching the
: : anemometer steady at 51 to 53 mph and gusts into the 60's.  Maximum I saw
: : was 67 mph with several at 65 mph.  Lowest reading over about 30 minutes,
: : while trying to gain courage to see if I was going to sail, was 47 mph.  I
: : cannot carry a board to the water in those kinds of winds, much less rig up.
: : I'm not sure you could wear a baggy drysuit and stand up.  Its been going
: : like this for hours.  People are tying down their cruisers.  We have good
: : winds but this is crazy with no storm anywhere in sight.  West Texas is
: : strange.

: : So how do you jibe in such conditions?  Easy.  You get in your car and
: : carefully try to go home.  As the wind comes across the tail of the car
: : (SUV) you bear off on the new tack, but be prepared to brake if your speed
: : picks up to much.  Tacking requires more accelerator, but it's much the
: : same.  Wait until you have sufficient forward speed, then you turn the wheel
: : slowly until the car comes around to the new tack.  Just as in windsurfing,
: : there is a forbidden zone dead into the wind where your gas mileage is
: : really poor.  Since water starting your SUV is not recommended, I advise not
: : doing a broad reach across the dam, try to stay on the side roads.

: : CI

 
 
 

Jibing in 60 mph winds...

Post by Aver » Mon, 26 Feb 2001 11:41:40

I have some pictures of when I went to Costa Rica years
ago.  The bottom picture was a 50-60mph day, I just sat and watched.
The guys sailing were 200lbs++ and had 2.5's, they were getting
worked too...

The top pic is me jibing on a nice mello 5.5 day, very fun place
to sail!

ave-

: Well, a call to the weather bureau says the winds are only 42 mph.  But out
: at the sailing club, several miles away and right on the leeshore where the
: wind is funneled down the lake for a few miles, I sat watching the
: anemometer steady at 51 to 53 mph and gusts into the 60's.  Maximum I saw
: was 67 mph with several at 65 mph.  Lowest reading over about 30 minutes,
: while trying to gain courage to see if I was going to sail, was 47 mph.  I
: cannot carry a board to the water in those kinds of winds, much less rig up.
: I'm not sure you could wear a baggy drysuit and stand up.  Its been going
: like this for hours.  People are tying down their cruisers.  We have good
: winds but this is crazy with no storm anywhere in sight.  West Texas is
: strange.

: So how do you jibe in such conditions?  Easy.  You get in your car and
: carefully try to go home.  As the wind comes across the tail of the car
: (SUV) you bear off on the new tack, but be prepared to brake if your speed
: picks up to much.  Tacking requires more accelerator, but it's much the
: same.  Wait until you have sufficient forward speed, then you turn the wheel
: slowly until the car comes around to the new tack.  Just as in windsurfing,
: there is a forbidden zone dead into the wind where your gas mileage is
: really poor.  Since water starting your SUV is not recommended, I advise not
: doing a broad reach across the dam, try to stay on the side roads.

: CI

 
 
 

Jibing in 60 mph winds...

Post by charlesive » Mon, 26 Feb 2001 13:15:48

Hey great pictures... I took the liberty of backing up to just the
Surf-N-Skate part of your site and there are three other good pictures worth
a look.  How did you get the pictures so large?

CI


Quote:
> Forgot the link, sorry...

> http://www.sonic.net/~averyd/pics/Surf-N-Skate/windsurf4.JPG

> ave-


> : I have some pictures of when I went to Costa Rica years
> : ago.  The bottom picture was a 50-60mph day, I just sat and watched.
> : The guys sailing were 200lbs++ and had 2.5's, they were getting
> : worked too...

> : The top pic is me jibing on a nice mello 5.5 day, very fun place
> : to sail!

> : ave-


> : : Well, a call to the weather bureau says the winds are only 42 mph.
But out
> : : at the sailing club, several miles away and right on the leeshore
where the
> : : wind is funneled down the lake for a few miles, I sat watching the
> : : anemometer steady at 51 to 53 mph and gusts into the 60's.  Maximum I
saw
> : : was 67 mph with several at 65 mph.  Lowest reading over about 30
minutes,
> : : while trying to gain courage to see if I was going to sail, was 47
mph.  I
> : : cannot carry a board to the water in those kinds of winds, much less
rig up.
> : : I'm not sure you could wear a baggy drysuit and stand up.  Its been
going
> : : like this for hours.  People are tying down their cruisers.  We have
good
> : : winds but this is crazy with no storm anywhere in sight.  West Texas
is
> : : strange.

> : : So how do you jibe in such conditions?  Easy.  You get in your car and
> : : carefully try to go home.  As the wind comes across the tail of the
car
> : : (SUV) you bear off on the new tack, but be prepared to brake if your
speed
> : : picks up to much.  Tacking requires more accelerator, but it's much
the
> : : same.  Wait until you have sufficient forward speed, then you turn the
wheel
> : : slowly until the car comes around to the new tack.  Just as in
windsurfing,
> : : there is a forbidden zone dead into the wind where your gas mileage is
> : : really poor.  Since water starting your SUV is not recommended, I
advise not
> : : doing a broad reach across the dam, try to stay on the side roads.

> : : CI

 
 
 

Jibing in 60 mph winds...

Post by Aver » Tue, 27 Feb 2001 05:32:49

Thanks!  These are 2-3 years old, back in the day when I used
to use my 35mm SLR FILM camera.  I now have a nice digital.
I sacanned those pics in with a scanner from 3x5 prints...
With the resolution scanners can do these days your pics
can be as big as you want!  :)  Those pics are probably
about 150-200DPI, while my scanner does 1200DPI!!!

ave-

: Hey great pictures... I took the liberty of backing up to just the
: Surf-N-Skate part of your site and there are three other good pictures worth
: a look.  How did you get the pictures so large?

: CI


:> Forgot the link, sorry...
:>
:> http://www.sonic.net/~averyd/pics/Surf-N-Skate/windsurf4.JPG
:>
:> ave-
:>

 
 
 

Jibing in 60 mph winds...

Post by Gary Woo » Wed, 28 Feb 2001 05:29:01

I recall some footage of "Duke of Nuke" Pat Dougherty (sp?) in an old
windsurfing video from the late 80's.  He was sailing a day of 70 mph
winds somewhere in the gorge, can't recall the site.

Sailing is an overstatement - the camera could only get occassional
glimpses of him through the smoke, and he went down HARD a few times.
He's a pretty big guy, and had a ***y sail completely sheeted out, and
he was getting dis'd big time ;-)

Guess everybody has their upper limit - just wish mine wasn't in the
***s 8-(

Quote:

> Charles asks:

> <<So how do you jibe in such conditions?>>

> By not rigging your 9.5 and 9.0 :)

 
 
 

Jibing in 60 mph winds...

Post by Bill Kli » Thu, 01 Mar 2001 15:38:15

Jibing in those winds is not easy. It has been years for me since I usually
sail at the Event site in town to stay close by my 11 and 13 yr old boys..they
like the skate park in town while I sail.

Anyway, I have sailed outside Hurricane Juan in Corpus Christi years ago and
also in East Winds here.

You really need to be in super condition physically and have you appropriate
equipment organized and rigged perfectly.

You need to really sheet in with confidence as you jibe, you must drive your
body (and knee) forward,  preferably banking off a swell.

It is extremely critical to foot steer the board with confident aggression.
This will minimize bouncing. You need the leverage to drive the board while
crossing chop. Pay close attention to small smooth lines between chop as you
come out of the turn. that will help you exit better.

Dave Russell (Rushwind) used to rig his sail higher above the board,
eliminating the gap and spilling excess power. That helped a lot.

Danny Tschudin used a slotted fin in white smoke. He ripped with confidence in
so much spray (60 to 70 in East Wind. he could see rainbows above his head.

Then there is Victor Roy... but he is another story for another day.

Bill Kline
Gorge Sport USA
Curtis Performance Fins, Orca Fins, Orca Kite Fins
Hood River, OR USA

ph/541 387 2649  fax/541 386 1715

 
 
 

Jibing in 60 mph winds...

Post by Rainma » Thu, 01 Mar 2001 16:39:18

I've tried gybing in 50 knots.... very hard indeed.   I found it waaaay
easier to just head up hard to windward, dump it, then waterstart in the
straps again..

 The couple of times I tried to actually gybe the board, I got wiped by the
sheer speed and killer chop.
 Eventually, the odds stacked up against me, and on a flat-out gybe attempt
in a *** big gust, I ate it, in a BIG way....3 broken ribs was the
result.

The worst part was getting back into shore from a long way out... and the
walk back to the vehicle.

   R.

--
Websites:
http://SportToday.org/
http://SportToday.org/


Quote:
> Jibing in those winds is not easy. It has been years for me since I
usually
> sail at the Event site in town to stay close by my 11 and 13 yr old
boys..they
> like the skate park in town while I sail.

> Anyway, I have sailed outside Hurricane Juan in Corpus Christi years ago
and
> also in East Winds here.

> You really need to be in super condition physically and have you
appropriate
> equipment organized and rigged perfectly.

> You need to really sheet in with confidence as you jibe, you must drive
your
> body (and knee) forward,  preferably banking off a swell.

> It is extremely critical to foot steer the board with confident
aggression.
> This will minimize bouncing. You need the leverage to drive the board
while
> crossing chop. Pay close attention to small smooth lines between chop as
you
> come out of the turn. that will help you exit better.

> Dave Russell (Rushwind) used to rig his sail higher above the board,
> eliminating the gap and spilling excess power. That helped a lot.

> Danny Tschudin used a slotted fin in white smoke. He ripped with
confidence in
> so much spray (60 to 70 in East Wind. he could see rainbows above his
head.

> Then there is Victor Roy... but he is another story for another day.

> Bill Kline
> Gorge Sport USA
> Curtis Performance Fins, Orca Fins, Orca Kite Fins
> Hood River, OR USA

> ph/541 387 2649  fax/541 386 1715