Harness Line Length

Harness Line Length

Post by John Bancza » Tue, 25 Jul 1995 04:00:00


Quote:
> > I'm still curious what other steps to take because I still feel like I'm
> > still not upright as much as I should be.
> > btw the boom is at neck level,

> Too high. Shoulder height or slightly lower for new sails. in the 1980's
> we sailed with the boom and about eye-level. Newer sails don't get raked
> back nearly as much and thus a lower boom works better for me.

I don't know if I agree with the boom height theory, although I am open to your
thoughts.  Generally, I was under the impression that the higher you were
comfortable with, the better.  This allowed the boom to be higher on the mast
and made for a cleaner, stiffer rig.  This can get to extremes, but it is what
I have found to work, especially on race sails.  I keep it a little lower on my
wave stuff, but if it gets too low on the race sails, then  it feels pretty
sloppy -
 
 
 

Harness Line Length

Post by GSwen567 » Wed, 26 Jul 1995 04:00:00

The concept behind low boom height is to minimize mast rake. Brad Duffy
and other speedsters contend that you want your rig standing up as
straight as possible and not raked or bent over to windward. Most people
like high booms because it gives off the bouncy, racy feeling that most
associate with speed. The highest speeds feel the most sedate.....
Dizsail

 
 
 

Harness Line Length

Post by AIRTI » Thu, 27 Jul 1995 04:00:00

 >
 > I recently moved from a Bic Rumba to Vivace 282 with some more modern
 > sails.  The problem I have now is not waterstarting or planing but
 > keeping my bum out of the water when at max speed!
 > At lower planing speeds my stance is fairly upright but as I accelerate
 > and push against the fin my body swings outboard and keeps catching in
 > the chop.  (And some people pay money for salt water***s'!!)
 >
 > My lines are roughly elbow to***in lenght.
 > Should I keep shortening them or is it my stance that needs to change?
 >
 > Regards
 > Jon
 >                        
Hi Jon
I have been gradually shortening my lines over the last two years, and
a recent article in one of the performance mags got me to change my
stance a bit as well.
I now try to flex my back leg slightly and straighten my front one.
At the same time I attempt to stay 'on top' of the back leg, with
emphasis on being more over the back of the board instead of way
out from it.  As long as you are well powered, this gives great
control with shorter lines, as keeping the sail closely sheeted
is not as much of an issue.
I also find this stance much more comfortable than the straight
legged cramped calfs style.
JMHO
Gary
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