jibing technique (rotate/step)

jibing technique (rotate/step)

Post by Dave Crab » Wed, 04 Jan 1995 04:53:05


I see in the Hood river video they teach about carving turning and THEN
stepping forward. But in every PBA show I see, the pros don't use this
technique at all. They seem to gently sheet out at they carve, and slowly
rotate the sail AS they step up near the mast.

I have tried the Hood river approach all fall as I tried to learn to jibe and
found that I couldn't maintain enough speed. (weight on tail sinking and
slowing me down?). Stepping up looks like a better way to keep weight forward
and looks like a better technique for learning.

Any comments???
------------------------------------------------
  Dave Crabbe
  NSCC - Burridge Campus
  Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada

------------------------------------------------

 
 
 

jibing technique (rotate/step)

Post by BILL1 » Wed, 04 Jan 1995 15:51:37

I founded the school here in the Gorge that later produced the video. This
is an excellent video, but I had a disagreement with John(the author) on
this very point
when analyzing one of Robbie Naish's jybes. His contention it was old
fashion, my contention look how he is flying through the jybe AND
maintaining momentum! This first step jybe was basically the same the pros
use today. Remembere this is a good video, but when in doubt, watch the
pros, they are the worlds best.

 
 
 

jibing technique (rotate/step)

Post by Harry Bur » Thu, 05 Jan 1995 01:39:09

Saving the step till the end allows you to exit the turn with more speed, but
requires you to be fully powered initiating the turn.

 
 
 

jibing technique (rotate/step)

Post by Craig Goud » Thu, 05 Jan 1995 04:57:14

Quote:

>I see in the Hood river video they teach about carving turning and THEN
>stepping forward. But in every PBA show I see, the pros don't use this
>technique at all. They seem to gently sheet out at they carve, and slowly
>rotate the sail AS they step up near the mast.
>I have tried the Hood river approach all fall as I tried to learn to jibe and
>found that I couldn't maintain enough speed. (weight on tail sinking and
>slowing me down?). Stepping up looks like a better way to keep weight forward
>and looks like a better technique for learning.
>Any comments???

Hi Dave,

Yep I have some comments.  I use both these techniques, but prefer
switching feet after the jibe (not stepping forward).  If well powered,
it's a much smoother transition.  If I'm underpowered, then a step jibe
is the call because it keeps the board on a plane longer.  This is
particularly good for some one just learning to jibe, because it
gives you more time to***up and recover since the board can plane longer
while not powered up.  Trying this ( a step jibe) while well powered on a
4.5 or below day doesn't work for me though, I generally get launched because
of the lack of control trying to switch feet while flipping the sail.

So why do pro slalom sailor use this method.  I guess two reasons.  First
they seem to be in marginal wind a lot, second, you can get a tighter arch
turn at the mark (which should be pretty usefull in slalom).

Craig's .02

8'4" CFX Wave Slalom, 9'4" Progressive Composites Course Slalom
Wt 160#, Ht 6'3", Usually sail on high desert lakes near SLC in Ut
Go short or go home

 
 
 

jibing technique (rotate/step)

Post by Chris Thom » Thu, 05 Jan 1995 23:47:21

: I see in the Hood river video they teach about carving turning and THEN
: stepping forward. But in every PBA show I see, the pros don't use this
: technique at all. They seem to gently sheet out at they carve, and slowly
: rotate the sail AS they step up near the mast.

: I have tried the Hood river approach all fall as I tried to learn to jibe and
: found that I couldn't maintain enough speed. (weight on tail sinking and
: slowing me down?). Stepping up looks like a better way to keep weight forward
: and looks like a better technique for learning.

Flip the rig after the foot change (Step gybe) is easiest to learn and much
easier to stay dry. This is especially true on slalom type boards. I think the
pros use this because, ultimately, it gives faster exits. Staying dry in a
race is pretty important also.

Flip the rig before the foot change (Carve gybe) is easiest to plane out
of the turn, but is harder to learn. Also you need to be more powered up.

My advice, as someone who makes the occasional carve gybe, is to stick with
the step gybe for some time. You'll progress faster if you're not knackered
from constant watertarts.
--
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
Chris Thomas                            March Systems Consultancy Ltd.
                                        14 Brewery Court    

 
 
 

jibing technique (rotate/step)

Post by Don Backo » Fri, 06 Jan 1995 13:12:38


Quote:

>I see in the Hood river video they teach about carving turning and THEN
>stepping forward. But in every PBA show I see, the pros don't use this
>technique at all. They seem to gently sheet out at they carve, and slowly
>rotate the sail AS they step up near the mast.

>I have tried the Hood river approach all fall as I tried to learn to jibe and
>found that I couldn't maintain enough speed. (weight on tail sinking and
>slowing me down?). Stepping up looks like a better way to keep weight forward
>and looks like a better technique for learning.

>Any comments???
>------------------------------------------------
>  Dave Crabbe
>  NSCC - Burridge Campus
>  Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada

>------------------------------------------------

Dave,
The main thing you need to complete a jibe is SPEED. My technique is to look
ahead to find the right kind of water conditions for the turn. Once I have a
spot picked out I sheet in hard to generate as much speed as possible.
I remove the back foot foot from the strap and place that foot on the other
side of the board, applying presure to initiate the carve. Take advantage of
a swell whenever possible to ride down it's face during the jibe to maintain
boardspeed. As you turn you will be sheeting out and you will need to release your
back hand and cross it over your front hand whilereaching past the mast for
your new grip on the opposite boom. Once you have that hand in place you can
go for the grip with the other hand and sheet in aggresivly to resume on new tack.
This will all come together in time.
You are right in your observation of not stepping forward as shown in some of the
gorge film. Remember that we have BIG wind out here and with the speed the need to
step forward to maintain speed an keep the tail from sinking is not much of a problem.
Other factors include body weight, board design, etc.
Good luck, it takes time - lots of it (voice of experince).

it gets to where I can't hardly handle it with a 3.0 sail.