What is a "Sleeping Wave"

What is a "Sleeping Wave"

Post by Benjamin Kaufma » Wed, 29 Nov 2000 04:00:00


I just got back from my vacation to CA. I Went from SF down to LA.  No
windsurfing. However, while running along the beach front in Cambria there was a
warning to swimmers which, among other things such as rip tides, mentioned
"sleeping waves."  Does anyone know what this is?  Thanks.

Ben

 
 
 

What is a "Sleeping Wave"

Post by Craig gsogh Goudi » Wed, 29 Nov 2000 04:00:00



Quote:
> I just got back from my vacation to CA. I Went from SF down to LA.  No
> windsurfing. However, while running along the beach front in Cambria
there was a
> warning to swimmers which, among other things such as rip tides,
mentioned
> "sleeping waves."  Does anyone know what this is?  Thanks.

> Ben

I'm no surf expert, but a sleeping or "rogue" wave is one that
builds rapidly with no precursive set or indication.

--
Craig (Go Short or Go Home!) Goudie
Sailing the high desert lakes of Utah on my:
RRD 298, Starboard 272 and Bailey 8'6" with
Naish Sails and Rec Composites Fins

Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Before you buy.

 
 
 

What is a "Sleeping Wave"

Post by Glenn Woode » Wed, 29 Nov 2000 04:00:00


Quote:

>I'm no surf expert, but a sleeping or "rogue" wave is one that
>builds rapidly with no precursive set or indication.

That would be my guess too. Rogue waves also tend to come from unexpected
directions.

 
 
 

What is a "Sleeping Wave"

Post by Gary Woo » Wed, 29 Nov 2000 04:00:00

I got the impression from a "Perfect Storm" that a rogue wave was once where
the sine wave pattern of one wave met with a coincidental pattern in another
wave.  Somebody told me that if waves generated from one system met with
those from another system (similar direction, I guess), occassionally the
resulting waves could "build" on each other.

Gary

Quote:

> I'm no surf expert, but a sleeping or "rogue" wave is one that
> builds rapidly with no precursive set or indication.

 
 
 

What is a "Sleeping Wave"

Post by Glenn Woode » Thu, 30 Nov 2000 12:00:55


Quote:

>I got the impression from a "Perfect Storm" that a rogue wave was once where
>the sine wave pattern of one wave met with a coincidental pattern in another
>wave.  Somebody told me that if waves generated from one system met with
>those from another system (similar direction, I guess), occassionally the
>resulting waves could "build" on each other.

That definitely does happen. It's called constructive inteference and it
happens with sound waves as well. I have heard of both definitions. I geuss if
it's unidentified then it's called a rogue wave.
 
 
 

What is a "Sleeping Wave"

Post by Glenn Woode » Thu, 30 Nov 2000 12:08:46



Quote:

>I geuss if
>it's unidentified then it's called a rogue wave.

I can tell I'm tired when what I type is even worse than the typing itself. I'm
going to bed.
 
 
 

What is a "Sleeping Wave"

Post by Endo » Thu, 30 Nov 2000 04:00:00

ooooooh resonant waves......cool.

Endo

Quote:

>I got the impression from a "Perfect Storm" that a rogue wave was once where
>the sine wave pattern of one wave met with a coincidental pattern in another
>wave.  Somebody told me that if waves generated from one system met with
>those from another system (similar direction, I guess), occassionally the
>resulting waves could "build" on each other.

>Gary


>> I'm no surf expert, but a sleeping or "rogue" wave is one that
>> builds rapidly with no precursive set or indication.

 
 
 

What is a "Sleeping Wave"

Post by Nigel Tailyou » Fri, 01 Dec 2000 04:00:00

Is it like a "Mexican Wave" during a really boring game?
Nigel Tailyour


Quote:


> > I just got back from my vacation to CA. I Went from SF down to LA.  No
> > windsurfing. However, while running along the beach front in Cambria
> there was a
> > warning to swimmers which, among other things such as rip tides,
> mentioned
> > "sleeping waves."  Does anyone know what this is?  Thanks.

> > Ben

> I'm no surf expert, but a sleeping or "rogue" wave is one that
> builds rapidly with no precursive set or indication.

> --
> Craig (Go Short or Go Home!) Goudie
> Sailing the high desert lakes of Utah on my:
> RRD 298, Starboard 272 and Bailey 8'6" with
> Naish Sails and Rec Composites Fins

> Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
> Before you buy.

 
 
 

What is a "Sleeping Wave"

Post by Roger Jacks » Fri, 01 Dec 2000 04:00:00

I'm pretty sure this refers to a "rogue wave" or an unusually large
wave that seems to come out of nowhere.
There have been several instances of people (fisherman primarily)
being swept off (pounded into) the rock jetties and breakwaters in
the So. Calif. area. Many of them drowned or were seriously injured
when a large wave broke over the breakwater.
They may have been fishing there for hours, perfectly dry, and then
this one big wave breaks over the jetty and they are suddenly in the
water, or worse battered over the rocks.
I've seen the same warning, primarily on the jetties and breakwaters
where this has occured in the past.

Ben:
You went all the way from the Bay area to So. Calif. and you couldn't
find anywhere to sail??? What's up with that?
Several sites in the SF. Bay,  Santa Cruz, San Luis Res., Lake
Isabella, Santa Barbara, Cabrillo Beach, San Diego.
Lots of places, many of them with some sort of rental gear?
Hmmmmm.....

Quote:
> > > I just got back from my vacation to CA. I Went from SF down to

LA.  No windsurfing. However, while running along the beach front in
Cambria there was a warning to swimmers which, among other things such
as rip tides, mentioned "sleeping waves."  Does anyone know what this
is?  Thanks.

Quote:

> > > Ben

> > I'm no surf expert, but a sleeping or "rogue" wave is one that
> > builds rapidly with no precursive set or indication.

> > --
> > Craig (Go Short or Go Home!) Goudie
> > Sailing the high desert lakes of Utah on my:
> > RRD 298, Starboard 272 and Bailey 8'6" with
> > Naish Sails and Rec Composites Fins

> > Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
> > Before you buy.

--
sailquik US 7011
Sailworks/Starboard

Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Before you buy.

 
 
 

What is a "Sleeping Wave"

Post by Mike » Fri, 01 Dec 2000 04:00:00

I kinow of at least two explanations for "sleeping", or simply unexpected,
waves. One is the constructive interference event discussed here, in which two
waves from difference directions happen to add up when they collide. That's
basic arithmetic and is common near hard reflective shorelines such as a dam or
bridge base.

The other source, which is probably what "sleeper" refers to, results from a
very wide but low wave rollin' across the deep ocean onto a shallow coastline.
Some deep-water ocean waves can be hundreds or thousands of meters long but just
a few inches high, sliding unnoticed beneath a ship. But think of the volume and
1/2mv**2 energy contained in that bulge, then try to imagine its shape when it
piles up on a shallow shoreline and dissipates all its energy in a suddenly
confined space and time. At its extreme it's called tsunami; its little brother
is called a sleeper. Same principle, different scale. Weather satellites can now
measure these 2"-inch-high, mile-long waves (or a 2"-high million-square-mile El
Nino tilt of the ocean), and are getting much better at recognizing both tidal
waves and the Southern Oscillations of El Nino/La Nina much sooner than before.

Disclaimer: the 2" figure comes from fuzzy memory, but I'm pretty sure that was
the resolution achievable these days.

Mike \m/
To reply directly, remove the SpamDam.


Quote:
> I'm pretty sure this refers to a "rogue wave" or an unusually large
> wave that seems to come out of nowhere.
> There have been several instances of people (fisherman primarily)
> being swept off (pounded into) the rock jetties and breakwaters in
> the So. Calif. area. Many of them drowned or were seriously injured
> when a large wave broke over the breakwater.
> They may have been fishing there for hours, perfectly dry, and then
> this one big wave breaks over the jetty and they are suddenly in the
> water, or worse battered over the rocks.
> I've seen the same warning, primarily on the jetties and breakwaters
> where this has occured in the past.

> Ben:
> You went all the way from the Bay area to So. Calif. and you couldn't
> find anywhere to sail??? What's up with that?
> Several sites in the SF. Bay,  Santa Cruz, San Luis Res., Lake
> Isabella, Santa Barbara, Cabrillo Beach, San Diego.
> Lots of places, many of them with some sort of rental gear?
> Hmmmmm.....

> > > > I just got back from my vacation to CA. I Went from SF down to
> LA.  No windsurfing. However, while running along the beach front in
> Cambria there was a warning to swimmers which, among other things such
> as rip tides, mentioned "sleeping waves."  Does anyone know what this
> is?  Thanks.

> > > > Ben

> > > I'm no surf expert, but a sleeping or "rogue" wave is one that
> > > builds rapidly with no precursive set or indication.

> > > --
> > > Craig (Go Short or Go Home!) Goudie
> > > Sailing the high desert lakes of Utah on my:
> > > RRD 298, Starboard 272 and Bailey 8'6" with
> > > Naish Sails and Rec Composites Fins

> > > Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
> > > Before you buy.

> --
> sailquik US 7011
> Sailworks/Starboard

> Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
> Before you buy.

 
 
 

What is a "Sleeping Wave"

Post by Benjamin Kaufma » Sun, 03 Dec 2000 04:00:00

It was pretty calm.  The best wind I saw was when we were taking the ferry from
Sausolito (sp?) back to SF. A few caps. Did not see a single windsurfer on the
entire vacation (week of Thanksgiving).  Just surfers, otters and seals (oh my).

Ben

On Thu, 30 Nov 2000 17:44:11 GMT, sailquik(Roger Jackson)

Quote:

>I'm pretty sure this refers to a "rogue wave" or an unusually large
>wave that seems to come out of nowhere.
>There have been several instances of people (fisherman primarily)
>being swept off (pounded into) the rock jetties and breakwaters in
>the So. Calif. area. Many of them drowned or were seriously injured
>when a large wave broke over the breakwater.
>They may have been fishing there for hours, perfectly dry, and then
>this one big wave breaks over the jetty and they are suddenly in the
>water, or worse battered over the rocks.
>I've seen the same warning, primarily on the jetties and breakwaters
>where this has occured in the past.

>Ben:
>You went all the way from the Bay area to So. Calif. and you couldn't
>find anywhere to sail??? What's up with that?
>Several sites in the SF. Bay,  Santa Cruz, San Luis Res., Lake
>Isabella, Santa Barbara, Cabrillo Beach, San Diego.
>Lots of places, many of them with some sort of rental gear?
>Hmmmmm.....

>> > > I just got back from my vacation to CA. I Went from SF down to
>LA.  No windsurfing. However, while running along the beach front in
>Cambria there was a warning to swimmers which, among other things such
>as rip tides, mentioned "sleeping waves."  Does anyone know what this
>is?  Thanks.

>> > > Ben

>> > I'm no surf expert, but a sleeping or "rogue" wave is one that
>> > builds rapidly with no precursive set or indication.

>> > --
>> > Craig (Go Short or Go Home!) Goudie
>> > Sailing the high desert lakes of Utah on my:
>> > RRD 298, Starboard 272 and Bailey 8'6" with
>> > Naish Sails and Rec Composites Fins

>> > Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
>> > Before you buy.