Bottom turns and getting out

Bottom turns and getting out

Post by Raymie Sta » Fri, 27 Apr 1990 02:05:52


I am having trouble doing bottom turns.  I can end up pointing almost
parallel to the wave, but it's not quite enough to let me get back on
top of it.  The jibe things help alot---bending knees, oversheeting
sail---but it's not enough.  What's the secret?

Also, I have trouble getting out through the waves.  There seems to
be a time just as the wave is going to break when there is nothing
U can do but watch it dump on Ur nose and take U under.  What do U
do if U get to the wave just as it's breaking?

  Raymie Stata

 
 
 

Bottom turns and getting out

Post by Rolland Wate » Sat, 28 Apr 1990 00:48:27

Quote:

>I am having trouble doing bottom turns.  I can end up pointing almost
>parallel to the wave, but it's not quite enough to let me get back on
>top of it.  The jibe things help alot---bending knees, oversheeting
>sail---but it's not enough.  What's the secret?

You don't say what kind of conditions you're trying to sail in.  
What you need to do will really vary with the speed of the waves and
the direction of the wind.  My guess is that you're in rather mushy
waves with the wind more onshore; the problem isn't the bottom
turn per se, but the cutback.  When the wind is onshore your cutback
occurs with the sail parallel to the wind and you get no power out
of it to force the board back down the wave.  You then are forced to
rely on the power of the wave, and if it's mushy you're no-wheresville.

If you've got real crisp waves then you're probably simply turning
too far in front of the breaking part of the wave.  Move closer to
the curl; you'll know when you've got it right 'cause the waves will
start to eat you... ;-)

Quote:

>Also, I have trouble getting out through the waves.  There seems to
>be a time just as the wave is going to break when there is nothing
>U can do but watch it dump on Ur nose and take U under.  What do U
>do if U get to the wave just as it's breaking?

Dive off your board right into the base of the wave.  When you, your
board, and your thoroughly trashed rig make it back to the beach,
count your blessings, sell everything to the nearest yuppy, and take
up rockclimbing.  

Either that, or jibe.  Heading up/ falling off to the already broken/
not yet breaking parts off the wave will also work, but you already
knew that, no?  Wave sails rigged several inches (3-6) above the deck
help, since the water can run under the sail rather than forcing the
rig to come to a stop.  Falling off and going fast also helps, but
make sure you can land your jumps on a plane; if you don't plane away
you'll have a moment of quiet reflection before dying under the next wave.

Still, there remains for every wave a time when you can't sail over
it; even dinky waves can eat you if they time it right.

Shaka, bro'

Rolland

 
 
 

Bottom turns and getting out

Post by Jim Te » Sat, 28 Apr 1990 02:39:02

Do a rad off the lip if the wave is breaking!

If you are leaving from shore, watch the sets of waves.  Time your
departure so you are going through the impact zone when the waves are the
smallest.  Or move along the shore to where they are smaller.

If you are going out after an inside turn, you have to punch through
them or run from them.  Maybe you need a bigger sail.

        Jim Tear  --  Hewlett-Packard  --  Ft. Collins, CO

We once had surf at Lake McConaughy, Nebraska--the best sailing in Colorado.

 
 
 

Bottom turns and getting out

Post by Raymie Sta » Sun, 29 Apr 1990 02:01:54

Thanks to Rolland Waters and Jim Tears for their advice.

Quote:
>My guess is that you're in rather mushy waves with the wind more
>onshore; ...

The wind was just a little bit on-shore.  I don't know about the waves:
what is a "mushy" wave?

Quote:
>Dive off your board right into the base of the wave.  When you, your
>board, and your thoroughly trashed rig make it back to the beach,
>count your blessings...

True confession: I did this once.  About a half-hour previously, a
wave had dumped on the nose of my board: I held on to my booms and
got dragged about 15 yards, mostly underwater.  (This forced so
much water into my head that my nose was still dripping when I went
to bed that night---very unpleasent).  Latter, I was staring at another
shoulder-high wall of water about to dump on my board, I panicked, and
I ditched.  My rig really took off: it rode the waves better without me
than with me!  Of course, swimming after it was not too much fun.  
Surprisingly, after all this abuse my equipment survived with only a
few cosmetic damages (though I'm sure I shortened the life of my
mast...).

I was upwind from the crowd, so my run-away rig didn't get in
anyone's way.  I still try to sail in uncrowded sections of the break
because I seem to find myself under the waves more than on top of them.
Pretty soon, though, I'll be cutting up the waves with the best sailors.

Thanks again,
  Raymie Stata