Starboard Formula, what it's like?

Starboard Formula, what it's like?

Post by Marku » Mon, 17 Apr 2000 04:00:00


I'm thinking of buying this board as a light-wind board along F2Air  260.
What are your feelings with Formula 155litres? I haven't seen any reviews or
tests on this one, so I'm wondering do I have to buy this one not knowing
exactly what it's like? I guess it's has done great in races but that's all.

Regards,
Markus

 
 
 

Starboard Formula, what it's like?

Post by sailqui » Tue, 18 Apr 2000 04:00:00

Markus:
Check out the review on the prototype Formula 155 at:
http://www.epinions.com/otdr-Windsurf_Boards-Starboard/Formula-Starbo...

Or, ask any of the 60-75 sailors who where at the Canadian Hole
on Friday or Sunday of this past weekend.
The Formula 155, with a 160 lb. sailor and a 9.5 Sailworks Retro
2000 was with out a doubt the first board to plane, out of about
100 or more boards that were there.
I had a little "race" with a very good Canadian amateur sailor
on a North 7.5 RBCL and Dave the instructor for Fox Watersports.
The Canadian was on the latest "ultra" longboard from Fanatic,
and Dave was on an Equipe or Superlite II race model.
In 6 knots, they could both pull away from the Formula upwind
but the Formula "slogs" very nearly as fast as the state of the
art longboards, with good sailors on them.
But, when the wind hit about 7 knots, the Formula left both of
them in the dust.
Oh, and I was able to drive the Canadian upwind until he stalled
while overtaking him on a plane with the Formula and the stock
58 cm Curtis, with a batch of weeds on it.
Imagine what I'll be able to do next week with a 60 Cm System
B.
The Formula is just about everything the Starboard adds claim,
and perhaps a bit more.
May not work for everyone, but for this 160 lb sailor it works
better than any other lite wind board I've ever sailed.
My friend Alan who weighs 220+ lbs, also thinks it's the
greatest thing since sliced bread. He took a 3rd place at the
Midwinters on the Formula 155 in his first race since a major
hand injury and his first race on the Formula. Not bad I'd say.

Hope this helps!
        Roger

Quote:
> What are your feelings with Formula 155litres? I haven't seen any >reviews or tests on this one, so I'm wondering do I have to buy
>this one not knowing exactly what it's like? I guess it's has done
> great in races but that's all.

Come to the Windfest at Frisco Woods, Cape Hatteras the week
after next, and you will be able to sail one. There will be at
least 2 or 3 available for demo.

--
sailquik (Roger Jackson) US 7011
Sailworks/Starboard/F2/MPB/Chinook/Kokatat/DaKine

 
 
 

Starboard Formula, what it's like?

Post by MTVNewsG » Tue, 18 Apr 2000 04:00:00

About the Starboard Formula, Sailquik wrote
<<Check out the review on the prototype Formula 155 at:
http://www.epinions.com/otdr-Windsurf_Boards-Starboard/Formula-Starbo...
ormula
And
<<May not work for everyone, but for this 160 lb sailor it works
better than any other lite wind board I've ever sailed. >>

Roger,
    Who would you say the Formula might not be for?  My own question regarding
raceboards is "can I have fun sailing one all day?"  I've only jumped on race
boards for 15 minutes or so, and while the upwind/downwind/early planing
improvement over "recreational" boards is obvious, they feel like a
handful...that I'd have to stay very focused on board trim at every moment,
perhaps not suited for pointing the board into the middle of the bay and taking
a pleasure cruise.

Michael
US5613

 
 
 

Starboard Formula, what it's like?

Post by Brian Collis US+ » Fri, 21 Apr 2000 04:00:00



Quote:
> About the Starboard Formula, Sailquik wrote
> <<Check out the review on the prototype Formula 155 at:

http://www.epinions.com/otdr-Windsurf_Boards-Starboard/Formula-Starboard
_F

Quote:
> ormula

> And
> <<May not work for everyone, but for this 160 lb sailor it works
> better than any other lite wind board I've ever sailed. >>

> Roger,
>     Who would you say the Formula might not be for?  My own question
regarding
> raceboards is "can I have fun sailing one all day?"  I've only jumped
on race
> boards for 15 minutes or so, and while the upwind/downwind/early
planing
> improvement over "recreational" boards is obvious, they feel like a
> handful...that I'd have to stay very focused on board trim at every
moment,
> perhaps not suited for pointing the board into the middle of the bay
and taking
> a pleasure cruise.

> Michael
> US5613

That would depend on how much wind you have on that given day.. Alan was
kind enough to let me use his formula 2 or 3 weeks before the
midwinters, and with his 9.6 and 6-9 knots of wind I had lots of fun
taking a pleasure cruise across the river. Several times when the wind
dropped, or after a jibing attempt, I managed to pump myself up on to a
plane, and when the wind came up (say 9-12knots) the board responded
very well.. not a handfull at all.. just more speed. If the wind would
have jumped up to 15-20, I would have switched fins, sails, and kept on
going. If I had the cash, I'd buy one.

B
US+1

Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Before you buy.

 
 
 

Starboard Formula, what it's like?

Post by josephmee.. » Fri, 21 Apr 2000 04:00:00

I would have to say that the Starboard Formula is one board for all
men/women. I have sailed this with big race sails in light winds and it is
probably the best board out there.  I have also sailed this board with a 5.6
wave sail and it was not a handful, it was actually pleasant to sail (the
bevelled rails help a lot).

This board has something for everyone, for the person that wants to race to
the person that wants to enjoy sailing everyday at the weekend.

GO out and buy it and enjoy it - thats my advice.

Joseph
IR-84
Starboard/Neil Pryde



Quote:


> > About the Starboard Formula, Sailquik wrote
> > <<Check out the review on the prototype Formula 155 at:

> http://www.epinions.com/otdr-Windsurf_Boards-Starboard/Formula-Starboard
> _F
> > ormula

> > And
> > <<May not work for everyone, but for this 160 lb sailor it works
> > better than any other lite wind board I've ever sailed. >>

> > Roger,
> >     Who would you say the Formula might not be for?  My own question
> regarding
> > raceboards is "can I have fun sailing one all day?"  I've only jumped
> on race
> > boards for 15 minutes or so, and while the upwind/downwind/early
> planing
> > improvement over "recreational" boards is obvious, they feel like a
> > handful...that I'd have to stay very focused on board trim at every
> moment,
> > perhaps not suited for pointing the board into the middle of the bay
> and taking
> > a pleasure cruise.

> > Michael
> > US5613

> That would depend on how much wind you have on that given day.. Alan was
> kind enough to let me use his formula 2 or 3 weeks before the
> midwinters, and with his 9.6 and 6-9 knots of wind I had lots of fun
> taking a pleasure cruise across the river. Several times when the wind
> dropped, or after a jibing attempt, I managed to pump myself up on to a
> plane, and when the wind came up (say 9-12knots) the board responded
> very well.. not a handfull at all.. just more speed. If the wind would
> have jumped up to 15-20, I would have switched fins, sails, and kept on
> going. If I had the cash, I'd buy one.

> B
> US+1

> Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
> Before you buy.

Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Before you buy.
 
 
 

Starboard Formula, what it's like?

Post by MTVNewsG » Fri, 21 Apr 2000 04:00:00

What was jibing the board like?  How strange was it to step a yard across the
board to initiate, how did it turn etc?
Michael
US5613
 
 
 

Starboard Formula, what it's like?

Post by Karina & Da » Fri, 21 Apr 2000 04:00:00

I think a misconception about raceboards is that, as a group, they are
difficult to sail.  To my mind, raceboards are among the easiest to sail if
you want to sail in the direction raceboards are intended to go.  Many
people tend to sail in this way anyhow, regardless of gear.  They push
themselves forward almost all the time, and a challenging board to such a
rider is often a board that will take them that degree higher and lower, a
bit faster.  Raceboards easily pull the most g's when jibed hard while
staying the most stable at gut wrenching speeds.

So, the question is really what edges I wish to clip in order to tame the
beast.  Do I go with a board less "aggressive" in order to relax a bit more?
Sometimes, yes.  Or do I spend some time tweaking my sails and fins in order
to find the sweet spot of a board?  Also, yes.  I guess it just depends on
how I want to sail.  If racing, well, duh.  If sailing all over super-fast,
I want a board that requires less attention.

Lots of people have fun sailing raceboards all day.  The fun finds itself in
developing sailing skills and techniques, sometimes even despite a demanding
board. If you mean to have fun by occasional drag racing, not bumming when
you nick a fin, or leaving rigging your adjustable outhaul for another day,
many boards will perform admirably.

I too am interested in a "do-all" raceboard. I like the Techno for that
reason.  If I chose the "Formula 31" class it would only be because the
Techno competition lacks (it certainly doesn't) or because I like gear
warfare.  Which I do, but probably shouldn't.

I doubt this adds anything new to your thoughts.  After all, your post
already smacks of racer-chaser.  Why hold back, other than budget?  Maybe a
full blown raceboard will suit your needs?  One board generally covers most
conditions anyway, especially with a well planned fin and sail program.
That way, you get some of the best fun: winning!

Submitted in good fun.

-Dan

 
 
 

Starboard Formula, what it's like?

Post by Brian Collis US+ » Sat, 22 Apr 2000 04:00:00

I'm not going to say that it wasn't strange to take a full step across
the board to initate the jibe, but I'm sure that it's something that I
could get used to. It's definately tougher to start the jybe, and keep
it going than it is on my Energy, or my ATV, but you have to expect that
when you're sitting on top of a 58(?) cm fin. I didn't manage to pull
off a complete planing jybe, but I'm sure that it had more to do with my
ability, or maybe the wind than the Formula.

b



Quote:
> What was jibing the board like?  How strange was it to step a yard
across the
> board to initiate, how did it turn etc?
> Michael
> US5613

Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Before you buy.
 
 
 

Starboard Formula, what it's like?

Post by josephmee.. » Sat, 22 Apr 2000 04:00:00

I have to agree entirely with Dan, it is a huge misconception that
raceboards are hard to sail.  All racers want to be concentrating on
wind shifts, where other sailors are, how to over take and NOT on how
to keep the board on the water and to stop tripping a rail.

The Starboard Formula is actually very easy to sail and to gybe (once
you have got used to taking the big step over to engage the rail).

Enjoy your sailing,

Joseph
IR-84



Quote:
> I think a misconception about raceboards is that, as a group, they are
> difficult to sail.  To my mind, raceboards are among the easiest to
sail if
> you want to sail in the direction raceboards are intended to go.  Many
> people tend to sail in this way anyhow, regardless of gear.  They push
> themselves forward almost all the time, and a challenging board to
such a
> rider is often a board that will take them that degree higher and
lower, a
> bit faster.  Raceboards easily pull the most g's when jibed hard while
> staying the most stable at gut wrenching speeds.

> So, the question is really what edges I wish to clip in order to tame
the
> beast.  Do I go with a board less "aggressive" in order to relax a bit
more?
> Sometimes, yes.  Or do I spend some time tweaking my sails and fins in
order
> to find the sweet spot of a board?  Also, yes.  I guess it just
depends on
> how I want to sail.  If racing, well, duh.  If sailing all over
super-fast,
> I want a board that requires less attention.

> Lots of people have fun sailing raceboards all day.  The fun finds
itself in
> developing sailing skills and techniques, sometimes even despite a
demanding
> board. If you mean to have fun by occasional drag racing, not bumming
when
> you nick a fin, or leaving rigging your adjustable outhaul for another
day,
> many boards will perform admirably.

> I too am interested in a "do-all" raceboard. I like the Techno for
that
> reason.  If I chose the "Formula 31" class it would only be because
the
> Techno competition lacks (it certainly doesn't) or because I like gear
> warfare.  Which I do, but probably shouldn't.

> I doubt this adds anything new to your thoughts.  After all, your post
> already smacks of racer-chaser.  Why hold back, other than budget?
Maybe a
> full blown raceboard will suit your needs?  One board generally covers
most
> conditions anyway, especially with a well planned fin and sail
program.
> That way, you get some of the best fun: winning!

> Submitted in good fun.

> -Dan

Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Before you buy.